GFG--theatric'ly

An Autobiographical Review of Freedley and Reeves' A History of the Theatre, Including the Reprocuction of Numerous Newspaper Clippings in the Text and an Appendix of Etchings, Half-tones, and Colorgravures. Pittsburgh Bicentennial Publication and Book of the Future

GFG--theatric'ly


Encyclopedia of British Writers, 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries

Encyclopedia of British Writers, 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries

Presents a two-volume A to Z reference on English authors from the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, providing information about major figures, key schools and genres, biographical information, author publications and some critical analyses.

For the Love of the Archers

An Unofficial Companion

For the Love of the Archers

Have you ever wondered... • Why did listeners campaign to 'Free the Ambridge One'? • How many of the Horrobins have spent time at Her Majesty’s pleasure? • Who fell to his untimely death from the roof of Lower Loxley Hall one stormy January night? For the answers to all these questions and many more, dive into this fascinating miscellany and become an Ambridge expert. It’s been over 60 years since the familiar dum-di-dum-didum- di-dum of ‘Barwick Green’ first brought The Archers to our airwaves, and in that time millions of listeners have followed the everyday lives of country folk in Ambridge. This new companion, which brings together facts and trivia about characters, controversies and country customs in one handy volume, will delight avid addicts and keen newbies alike.

Poems Please! 2nd Edition

Sharing poetry with children

Poems Please! 2nd Edition

This innovative resource includes tools for classroom management that range from assessment techniques to tips for choosing and displaying poems.

The theatrics of revolution

Tian Han (1898-1968) and the cultural politics of performance in modern China

The theatrics of revolution


Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Choice


Prospero's Son

Life, Books, Love, and Theater

Prospero's Son

“This book is the record of a struggle between two temperaments, two consciousnesses and almost two epochs.” That’s how Edmund Gosse opened Father and Son, the classic 1907 book about his relationship with his father. Seth Lerer’s Prospero’s Son is, as fits our latter days, altogether more complicated, layered, and multivalent, but at its heart is that same problem: the fraught relationship between fathers and sons. At the same time, Lerer’s memoir is about the power of books and theater, the excitement of stories in a young man’s life, and the transformative magic of words and performance. A flamboyantly performative father, a teacher and lifelong actor, comes to terms with his life as a gay man. A bookish boy becomes a professor of literature and an acclaimed expert on the very children’s books that set him on his path in the first place. And when that boy grows up, he learns how hard it is to be a father and how much books can, and cannot, instruct him. Throughout these intertwined accounts of changing selves, Lerer returns again and again to stories—the ways they teach us about discovery, deliverance, forgetting, and remembering. “A child is a man in small letter,” wrote Bishop John Earle in the seventeenth century. “His father hath writ him as his own little story.” With Prospero’s Son, Seth Lerer acknowledges the author of his story while simultaneously reminding us that we all confront the blank page of life on our own, as authors of our lives.