Militarized Modernity And Gendered Citizenship In South Korea

Author: Seungsook Moon
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082238731X
Size: 44.89 MB
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This pathbreaking study presents a feminist analysis of the politics of membership in the South Korean nation over the past four decades. Seungsook Moon examines the ambitious effort by which South Korea transformed itself into a modern industrial and militarized nation. She demonstrates that the pursuit of modernity in South Korea involved the construction of the anticommunist national identity and a massive effort to mold the populace into useful, docile members of the state. This process, which she terms “militarized modernity,” treated men and women differently. Men were mobilized for mandatory military service and then, as conscripts, utilized as workers and researchers in the industrializing economy. Women were consigned to lesser factory jobs, and their roles as members of the modern nation were defined largely in terms of biological reproduction and household management. Moon situates militarized modernity in the historical context of colonialism and nationalism in the twentieth century. She follows the course of militarized modernity in South Korea from its development in the early 1960s through its peak in the 1970s and its decline after rule by military dictatorship ceased in 1987. She highlights the crucial role of the Cold War in South Korea’s militarization and the continuities in the disciplinary tactics used by the Japanese colonial rulers and the postcolonial military regimes. Moon reveals how, in the years since 1987, various social movements—particularly the women’s and labor movements—began the still-ongoing process of revitalizing South Korean civil society and forging citizenship as a new form of membership in the democratizing nation.

South Korea In Transition

Author: Kyung-Sup Chang
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351548131
Size: 35.80 MB
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South Korea has continued to impress the world in the way it has harnessed social modernization, economic development, political democratization and, most recently, multi-faceted globalization. Relying on both established and inventive citizenship perspectives, the authors in this volume collectively show that all these diverse societal transformations and achievements can be concretely and systematically comprehended in conjunction with citizens? reshaping identities, rights, and duties in civil society and national polity. South Koreans? eye-catching traits and trends of educational zeal, economic development, civil activism, nationalism, and neoliberal globalization are analyzed here as diverse yet often interconnected manifestations of citizenship politics. As shown comprehensively in this volume, the necessity of such citizenship-focused analyses is particularly evident in recent years as South Korea has been undergoing a condensed transition from class politics to citizenship politics.This book is a highly inclusive yet incisive account of modern and late modern Korea, utilizing citizenship as a powerful theoretical and analytical tool. Such judicious theoretical and analytical use of citizenship in respect to modern Korean history and society will in turn enable a meaningful expansion of theoretical and methodological utility of citizenship in contemporary global social sciences.This book was based on a special issue of Citizenship Studies.

Routledge Handbook Of Korean Culture And Society

Author: Youna Kim
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317337220
Size: 31.55 MB
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The Routledge Handbook of Korean Culture and Society is an accessible and interdisciplinary resource that explores the formation and transformation of Korean culture and society. Each chapter provides a comprehensive and thought-provoking overview on key topics, including: compressed modernity, religion, educational migration, social class and inequality, popular culture, digitalisation, diasporic cultures and cosmopolitanism. These topics are thoroughly explored by an international team of Korea experts, who provide historical context, examine key issues and debates, and highlight emerging questions in order to set the research agenda for the near future. Providing an interdisciplinary overview of Korean culture and society, this Handbook is an essential read for undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well scholars in Korean Studies, Cultural Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, and Asian Studies in general.

Park Chung Hee And Modern Korea

Author: Carter J. Eckert
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674659864
Size: 29.40 MB
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For South Koreans, the early 1960s to late 1970s were the best and worst of times—a period of unprecedented economic growth and deepening political oppression. Carter J. Eckert finds the roots of this dramatic socioeconomic transformation in the country’s long history of militarization, personified in South Korea’s paramount leader, Park Chung Hee.

Dmz Crossing

Author: Suk-Young Kim
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231537263
Size: 18.96 MB
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The Korean demilitarized zone might be among the most heavily guarded places on earth, but it also provides passage for thousands of defectors, spies, political emissaries, war prisoners, activists, tourists, and others testing the limits of Korean division. This book focuses on a diverse selection of inter-Korean border crossers and the citizenship they acquire based on emotional affiliation rather than constitutional delineation. Using their physical bodies and emotions as optimal frontiers, these individuals resist the state's right to draw geopolitical borders and define their national identity. Drawing on sources that range from North Korean documentary films, museum exhibitions, and theater productions to protester perspectives and interviews with South Korean officials and activists, this volume recasts the history of Korean division and draws a much more nuanced portrait of the region's Cold War legacies. The book ultimately helps readers conceive of the DMZ as a dynamic summation of personalized experiences rather than as a fixed site of historical significance.

Literature And Film In Cold War South Korea

Author: Theodore Hughes
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231500718
Size: 14.44 MB
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Korean writers and filmmakers crossed literary and visual cultures in multilayered ways under Japanese colonial rule (1910–1945). Taking advantage of new modes and media that emerged in the early twentieth century, these artists sought subtle strategies for representing the realities of colonialism and global modernity. Theodore Hughes begins by unpacking the relations among literature, film, and art in Korea's colonial period, paying particular attention to the emerging proletarian movement, literary modernism, nativism, and wartime mobilization. He then demonstrates how these developments informed the efforts of post-1945 writers and filmmakers as they confronted the aftershocks of colonialism and the formation of separate regimes in North and South Korea. Hughes puts neglected Korean literary texts, art, and film into conversation with studies on Japanese imperialism and Korea's colonial history. At the same time, he locates post-1945 South Korean cultural production within the transnational circulation of texts, ideas, and images that took place in the first three decades of the Cold War. The incorporation of the Korean Peninsula into the global Cold War order, Hughes argues, must be understood through the politics of the visual. In Literature and Film in Cold War South Korea, he identifies ways of seeing that are central to the organization of a postcolonial culture of division, authoritarianism, and modernization.

Rising Sun Divided Land

Author: Kate E. Taylor-Jones
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231850441
Size: 52.12 MB
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Rising Sun and Divided Land provides a comprehensive, scholarly examination of the historical background, films, and careers of selected Korean and Japanese film directors. It examines eight directors: Fukasaku Kinji, Im Kwon-teak, Kawase Naomi, Miike Takashi, Lee Chang-dong, Kitano Takeshi, Park Chan-wook, and Kim Ki-duk and considers their work as reflections of personal visions and as films that engage with globalization, colonialism, nationalism, race, gender, history, and the contemporary state of Japan and South Korea. Each chapter is followed by a short analysis of a selected film, and the volume as a whole includes a cinematic overview of Japan and South Korea and a list of suggestions for further reading and viewing.