Mindstorms

Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas

Mindstorms

The book that started the computer revolution in schools Computers have completely changed the way we teach children. We have Mindstorms to thank for that. In this book, pioneering computer scientist Seymour Papert uses the invention of LOGO, the first child-friendly programming language, to make the case for the value of teaching children with computers. Papert argues that children are more than capable of mastering computers, and that teaching computational processes like de-bugging in the classroom can change the way we learn everything else. He also shows that schools saturated with technology can actually improve socialization and interaction among students and between students and teachers. Technology changes every day, but the basic ways that computers can help us learn remain. For thousands of teachers and parents who have sought creative ways to help children learn with computers, Mindstorms is their bible.

The Children's Machine

Rethinking School In The Age Of The Computer

The Children's Machine

Shows readers how to integrate the computer into all areas of the school curriculum instead of making it a specialized course or just another gadget

Cognitive Effects of Multimedia Learning

Cognitive Effects of Multimedia Learning

"This book identifies the role and function of multimedia in learning through a collection of research studies focusing on cognitive functionality"--Provided by publisher.

Constructionism

Research Reports and Essays, 1985-1990

Constructionism

In 1985 the Media Lab was created at MIT to advance the idea that computation would give rise to a new science of expressive media. Within the media lab, the Epistemology and Learning group extends the traditional definition of media by treating as expressive media materials with which children play and learn. The Group's work follows a paradigm for learning research called Constructionism. Several of the chapters directly address the theoretical formulation of Constructionism, and others describe experimental studies which enrich and confirm different aspects of the idea. Thus this volume can be taken as the most extensive and definitive statement to date of this approach to media and education research and practice. This book is structured around four major themes: learning through designing and programming; epistemological styles in constructionist learning, children and cybernetics; and video as a research tool for exploring and documenting constructionist environments.

Times of the Technoculture

From the Information Society to the Virtual Life

Times of the Technoculture

Times of the Technoculture explores the social and cultural impact of new technologies, tracing the origins of the information society from the coming of the machine with the industrial revolution to the development of mass production techniques in the early twentieth century. The authors look at how the military has controlled the development of the information society, and consider the centrality of education in government attempts to create a knowledge society. Engaging in contemporary debates surrounding the internet, Robins and Webster question whether it can really offer us a new world of virtual communities, and suggest more radical alternatives to the corporate agenda of contemporary technologies.

Teaching and Learning Computer Programming

Multiple Research Perspectives

Teaching and Learning Computer Programming

The influx of computer technology into classrooms during the past decade raises the questions -- how can we teach children to use computers productively and what effect will learning to program computers have on them? During this same period, researchers have investigated novice learning of computer programming. Teaching and Learning Computer Programming unites papers and perspectives by respected researchers of teaching and learning computer science while it summarizes and integrates major theoretical and empirical contributions. It gives a current and concise account of how instructional techniques affect student learning and how learning of programming affects students' cognitive skills. This collection is an ideal supplementary text for students and a valuable reference for professionals and researchers of education, technology and psychology, computer science, communication, developmental psychology, and industrial organization.

Philosophy and Technology II

Information Technology and Computers in Theory and Practice

Philosophy and Technology II

Until recently, the philosophy and history of science proceeded in a separate way from the philosophy and history of technology, and indeed with respect to both science and technology, philosophical and historical inquiries were also following their separate ways. Now we see in the past quarter-century how the philosophy of science has been profoundly in fluenced by historical studies of the sciences, and no longer concerned so single-mindedly with the analysis of theory and explanation, with the re lation between hypotheses and experimental observation. Now also we see the traditional historical studies of technology supplemented by phi losophical questions, and no longer so plainly focussed upon contexts of application, on invention and practical engineering, and on the mutually stimulating relations between technology and society. Further, alas, the neat division of intellectual labor, those clearly drawn distinctions be tween science and technology, between the theoretical and the applied, between discovery and justification, between internalist and externalist approaches . . . all, all have become muddled! Partly, this is due to internal revolutions within the philosophy and his tory of science (the first result being recognition of their mutual rele vance). Partly, however, this state of 'muddle' is due to external factors: science, at the least in the last half-century, has become so intimately connected with technology, and technological developments have cre ated so many new fields of scientific (and philosophical) inquiry that any critical reflection on scientific and technological endeavors must hence forth take their interaction into account.

Thinking and Learning with ICT

Raising Achievement in Primary Classrooms

Thinking and Learning with ICT

Primary teachers need to incorporate the use of computers in their daily lesson plans, but how can this be done most effectively to promote learning skills in the classroom? In this fascinating book, Lyn Dawes and Rupert Wegerif outline a strategy for enhancing the effectiveness of computers for teaching and learning with an emphasis on: * raising pupil achievement in the core subject areas * developing collaborative learning in small groups * using group discussions as a way of improving general communication, as well as thinking and reasoning skills. The approach is to use computers as a support for collaborative learning in small groups and this book presents ways to prepare pupils for talking, learning and thinking together around computers. Excerpts from pupils' discussions illustrate the main issues and guidance on lesson planning and developing and choosing appropriate software is also provided. Thinking and Learning with ICT will be a valuable resource for primary teachers and student teachers.

Learning with Computers

Analysing Productive Interactions

Learning with Computers

Contrary to the belief that computers isolate users, Karen Littleton and Paul Light demonstrate that learning with computers is often a collaborative and social activity. Learning with Computers brings together a significant body of research that shows how working with others at the computer can be beneficial to learners of all ages, from the early school years to the highest levels of education. It also investigates factors such as gender that explain why some interactions are not as productive as others.