Look Here Look Away Look Again

Look Here Look Away Look Again

an orientation of thought in thinking how a / thought begins and then travels on to arrive / at another place connected and like-minded A work of art is never entirely present in itself but rather is always at large in the mind of the viewer. So it is that a painting needs to know the simplest question those viewing it are asking themselves. From the intimate starting point of observer and observed, Carson's seductive, exhilarating new collection turns poetry and paintings, making and representation, language and thought on their heads. "What happens when we experience a work of art? The poems in Edward Carson's stunningly original collection explore the intricate patterns of communication and response that unfold when we look at paintings, respond to music, read poems. Rather than simply cataloguing the works' contents, Carson recreates their dynamics and takes us inside them. The wonderful phrase he applies to a Miró painting, ‘a rhetoric / of exuberant spaces,' is descriptive of Look Here Look Away Look Again itself, and it is matched by a rhetoric of exuberant language that takes such supposedly unpoetic words as ‘phenotype,' ‘quantum,' or ‘algorithm' and brings them to life. At the same time, Carson revitalizes that time-worn form, the sonnet sequence – for that is what this collection is, when you ‘look again' – and weaves it together with recurrent twilit glimpses of birds, moon, and stars. Readers of Look Here Look Away Look Again will be looking in delight, again and again." John Reibetanz, award-winning poet, author of By Hand

Calder: The Conquest of Space

The Later Years: 1940-1976

Calder: The Conquest of Space

The concluding volume to the first biography of one of the most important, influential, and beloved twentieth-century sculptors, and one of the greatest artists in the cultural history of America--is a vividly written, illuminating account of his triumphant later years. The second and final volume of this magnificent biography begins during World War II, when Calder--known to all as Sandy--and his wife, Louisa, opened their home to a stream of artists and writers in exile from Europe. In the postwar decades, they divided their time between the United States and France, as Calder made his first monumental public sculptures and received blockbuster commissions that included Expo '67 in Montreal and the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Jed Perl makes clear how Calder's radical sculptural imagination shaped the minimalist and kinetic art movements that emerged in the 1960s. And we see, as well, that through everything--their ever-expanding friendships with artists and writers of all stripes; working to end the war in Vietnam; hosting riotous dance parties at their Connecticut home; seeing the "mobile," Calder's essential artistic invention, find its way into Webster's dictionary--Calder and Louisa remained the risk-taking, singularly bohemian couple they had been since first meeting at the end of the Roaring Twenties. The biography ends with Calder's death in 1976 at the age of seventy-eight--only weeks after an encyclopedic retrospective of his work opened at the Whitney Museum in New York--but leaves us with a new, clearer understanding of his legacy, both as an artist and a man.

Constellations of Miro, Breton

Constellations of Miro, Breton

During the early days of the Second World War, the Catalan painter Joan Miro created a startling series of twenty-three gouaches, his Constellations, works redolent with the nightmare of contemporary events. In 1958 the French poet Andre Breton composed his own "Constellations," a set of hermetic prose poems meant to "illustrate"-that is, not simply to shed light on, but to lend luster to-Miro's paintings, and to resume a peripatetic dialogue about exile. In "Constellations of Miro, Breton" Paul Hammond unravels some of the mysteries of the call-and-response of these two Surrealists by reading the pictures against the poetry, the poetry against the pictures, and both against the madness of a history that none of us has left that far behind. Featured in this edition are reproductions of the complete series of Joan Miro's Constellations and a translation of Andre Breton's "proses paralleles." Also included is Andre Breton's essay, "Constellations of Joan Miro," as well as documentary illustrations and photographs. About the Author Paul Hammond is the author of Marvellous Melies, "French Undressing, Upon the Pun: Dual Meaning in Words and Pictures (with Patrick Hughes), and a monograph on Luis Bunuel's L'Age d'or. He is the editor and translator of The Shadow and Its Shadow:Surrealist Writings on the Cinema (a new edition published by City Lights Books in Fall 2000), and the coeditor, with Ian Breakwell, of Seeing in the Dark: A Compendium of Cinemagoing and Brought to Book: The Balance of Books and Life. His translations include Whatever by Michel Houellebecq and The Virgin of the Hitmen by Fernando Vallejo.

Astrology through History: Interpreting the Stars from Ancient Mesopotamia to the Present

Astrology through History: Interpreting the Stars from Ancient Mesopotamia to the Present

Alphabetically arranged entries cover the history of astrology from ancient Mesopotamia to the 21st century. In addition to surveying the Western tradition, the book explores Islamic, Indian, East Asian, and Mesoamerican astrology. • Provides alphabetically arranged reference entries that delineate the historical and cultural significance of astrology from ancient Mesopotamia to the present • Directs direct users to additional sources of information via entry bibliographies • Offers sidebars offer additional facts from primary source documents • Incorporates a timeline to help readers to place astrological developments in chronological context • Features an introductory essay for a narrative overview of the history of astrology, priming readers on its cultural relevance

Calder/ Miro

Calder/ Miro

Sculptor Alexander Calder (1898-1976) and painter Joan Miró (1893-1983) became lifelong friends after their first meeting in Paris in 1928. This book and the exhibition it accompanies are about their extraordinary friendship and the early years of their careers. Calder and Miró shared many artistic interests, and the book is organized around common themes such as the circus, bestiary, universe, and constellations. The artists shared an ambition to create monumental works for public spaces and, while waiting for those opportunities, achieved monumentality on a reduced scale. Miró's small Constellations evoke the tradition of Romanesque frescoes, while Calder's earliest stabiles and mobiles occupy space in a way that transcends their size, paving the way for later monumental works. The editors, in their two essays and in their organization of the colour plates, focus on the first two decades of the artists' careers, culminating in the monumental public commissions that Calder and Miró received for the decoration of the Terrace Plaza Hotel, Cincinnati, in 1947. Both artists combined colour, shape and line in new ways, relying primarily on these limited elements to explore compositional space. While they worked independently, their resulting creations have long been recognized as reinforcing each other's vision. When their works are shown together, as John Canaday observed in his 1961 New York Times review, '- the element of fantasy is heightened in Calder's impeccably balanced structures and the element of calculation becomes more apparent than usual in Miró's looser inventions.' Extensive illustrations provide fresh insights into the visual dialogue between them and show the ways in which they expanded and erased the traditional boundaries in art. Their charming correspondence is published here for the first time and rare photographs of the two men together, and of the gifts of artwork they exchanged, document the friendship. A detailed chronology opens a window into their personal and professional lives. The book accompanies the exhibition Calder/Miró at Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel (2 May - 5 September 2004), and at The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. (9 October - 23 January 2005).