Nixon S White House Wars

Author: Patrick J. Buchanan
Publisher: Crown Forum
ISBN: 110190285X
Size: 35.49 MB
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From Vietnam to the Southern Strategy, from the opening of China to the scandal of Watergate, Pat Buchanan—speechwriter and senior adviser to President Nixon—tells the untold story of Nixon’s embattled White House, from its historic wins to it devastating defeats. In his inaugural address, Nixon held out a hand in friendship to Republicans and Democrats alike. But by the fall of 1969, massive demonstrations in Washington and around the country had been mounted to break his presidency. In a brilliant appeal to what he called the “Great Silent Majority,” Nixon sent his enemies reeling. Vice President Agnew followed by attacking the blatant bias of the media in a fiery speech authored and advocated by Buchanan. And by 1970, Nixon’s approval rating soared to 68 percent, and he was labeled “The Most Admired Man in America”. Them one by one, the crises came, from the invasion of Cambodia, to the protests that killed four students at Kent State, to race riots and court ordered school busing. Buchanan chronicles Nixon’s historic trip to China, and describes the White House strategy that brought about Nixon’s 49-state landslide victory over George McGovern in 1972. When the Watergate scandal broke, Buchanan urged the president to destroy the Nixon tapes before they were subpoenaed, and fire Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox, as Nixon ultimately did in the “Saturday Night Massacre.” After testifying before the Watergate Committee himself, Buchanan describes the grim scene at Camp David in August 1974, when Nixon’s staff concluded he could not survive In a riveting memoir from behind the scenes of the most controversial presidency of the last century, Nixon’s White House Wars reveals both the failings and achievements of the 37th President, recorded by one of those closest to Nixon from before his political comeback, through to his final days in office.

Republican Presidents And The Safety Net

Author: Matthew Gritter
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1498583571
Size: 43.72 MB
Format: PDF
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Since the New Deal, Republican presidents have looked for ways to accommodate rather than abolish the federal social safety net. Yet moderation often led to a backlash from their conservative supporters, leading Republican presidents, in some cases, to move from accommodation to opposition.

They Said No To Nixon

Author: Michael Koncewicz
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520970969
Size: 19.76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"Excruciatingly timely."—Kirkus Reviews In more than three thousand recorded conversations, the Nixon tapes famously exposed a president’s sinister views of governance that would eventually lead to his downfall. Despite Richard Nixon’s best efforts, his vision of a government where he could use his power to punish his political enemies never came to fruition because members of his own party defied his directives. While many are familiar with the Republicans who turned against Nixon during the final stages of the Watergate saga, They Said No to Nixon uncovers for the first time those within the administration—including Nixon’s own appointees—who opposed the White House early on, quietly blocking the president’s attacks on the IRS, the Justice Department, and other sectors of the federal government. Culling from previously unpublished excerpts from the tapes and recently released materials that expose the thirty-seventh president’s uncensored views, Michael Koncewicz reveals how Republican party members remained loyal civil servants in the face of Nixon’s attempts to expand the imperial presidency. Delving into the abuses of power surrounding the Watergate era and showing how they were curbed, They Said No to Nixon sheds light on the significant cultural and ideological shifts that occurred within the GOP during the pivotal 1970s. Koncewicz deftly demonstrates how Nixon’s administration marked a decisive moment that led to the rise of modern conservatism and today’s ruthlessly partisan politics.

Haig S Coup

Author: Ray Locker
Publisher: Potomac Books
ISBN: 1640120351
Size: 70.21 MB
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When General Alexander M. Haig Jr. returned to the White House on May 3, 1973, he found the Nixon administration in worse shape than he had imagined. President Richard Nixon, reelected in an overwhelming landslide just six months earlier, had accepted the resignations of his top aides—the chief of staff H. R. Haldeman and the domestic policy chief John Ehrlichman—just three days earlier. Haldeman and Ehrlichman had enforced the president’s will and protected him from his rivals and his worst instincts for four years. Without them, Nixon stood alone, backed by a staff that lacked gravitas and confidence as the Watergate scandal snowballed. Nixon needed a savior, someone who would lift his fortunes while keeping his White House from blowing apart. He hoped that savior would be his deputy national security adviser, Alexander Haig, whom he appointed chief of staff. But Haig’s goal was not to keep Nixon in office—it was to remove him. In Haig’s Coup, Ray Locker uses recently declassified documents to tell the true story of how Haig orchestrated Nixon’s demise, resignation, and subsequent pardon. A story of intrigues, cover-ups, and treachery, this incisive history shows how Haig engineered the “soft coup” that ended our long national nightmare and brought Watergate to an end.

Good Intentions

Author: Steven P Millies
Publisher: Liturgical Press
ISBN: 0814644902
Size: 49.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The 2016 presidential election was unlike any other in American history. Polls tell us that millions of American Catholics who care about moral issues and who descended from immigrants supported Donald Trump. Why didn’t Trump’s rhetoric on immigration and his promises to close the borders trouble more American Catholics? Despite his own vulgar behavior, his unconcealed selfishness, or his still-recent support for abortion rights, why were some serious Catholics drawn to Trump? In Good Intentions Steven P. Millies uncovers the history of how American Catholics came to this. More than that, Good Intentions offers an explanation for why Catholics behaved the way they did in 2016 with some practical reflections about how to put Catholic faith to better use in American politics.

Congressional Record

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 54.16 MB
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The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

Time

Author: Briton Hadden
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 55.85 MB
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Reels for 1973- include Time index, 1973-