No Man Knows My History

Author: Fawn McKay Brodie
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780679730545
Size: 38.14 MB
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In 1823 a young man named Joseph Smith had an encountr with an angel who led him to a cache of golden plates purporting to be the history of the lost tribes of Israel. Out of these new gospels and out of Smith's own charismatic personality and sense of mission- arose an authentically American religion, the Mormon faith.

No Man Knows My History

Author: Fawn McKay Brodie
Publisher: New York : Knopf
ISBN:
Size: 13.29 MB
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The classic biography of the founder of the Mormon church, this book attempts to answer the questions that continue to surround Joseph Smith. Was he a genuine prophet, or a gifted fabulist who became enthralled by the products of his imagination and ended up being martyred for them?

Reconsidering No Man Knows My History

Author: Newell G. Bringhurst
Publisher: Utah State Univ Pr
ISBN:
Size: 57.58 MB
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Scholars reexamine Brodie, her Joseph Smith biography, and its continuing importance to Mormon history.

No Man Knows My History

Author: Fawn McKay Brodie
Publisher: New York : Knopf
ISBN:
Size: 63.80 MB
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The classic biography of the founder of the Mormon church, this book attempts to answer the questions that continue to surround Joseph Smith. Was he a genuine prophet, or a gifted fabulist who became enthralled by the products of his imagination and ended up being martyred for them?

Believing History

Author: Richard Lyman Bushman
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231529562
Size: 55.44 MB
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The eminent historian Richard Bushman here reflects on his faith and the history of his religion. By describing his own struggle to find a basis for belief in a skeptical world, Bushman poses the question of how scholars are to write about subjects in which they are personally invested. Does personal commitment make objectivity impossible? Bushman explicitly, and at points confessionally, explains his own commitments and then explores Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon from the standpoint of belief. Joseph Smith cannot be dismissed as a colorful fraud, Bushman argues, nor seen only as a restorer of religious truth. Entangled in nineteenth-century Yankee culture—including the skeptical Enlightenment—Smith was nevertheless an original who cut his own path. And while there are multiple contexts from which to draw an understanding of Joseph Smith (including magic, seekers, the Second Great Awakening, communitarianism, restorationism, and more), Bushman suggests that Smith stood at the cusp of modernity and presented the possibility of belief in a time of growing skepticism. When examined carefully, the Book of Mormon is found to have intricate subplots and peculiar cultural twists. Bushman discusses the book's ambivalence toward republican government, explores the culture of the Lamanites (the enemies of the favored people), and traces the book's fascination with records, translation, and history. Yet Believing History also sheds light on the meaning of Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon today. How do we situate Mormonism in American history? Is Mormonism relevant in the modern world? Believing History offers many surprises. Believers will learn that Joseph Smith is more than an icon, and non-believers will find that Mormonism cannot be summed up with a simple label. But wherever readers stand on Bushman's arguments, he provides us with a provocative and open look at a believing historian studying his own faith.

Joseph Smith And The Beginnings Of Mormonism

Author: Richard L. Bushman
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252060120
Size: 25.21 MB
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Focuses on the first twenty-five years of Smith's life, describes his visions, and recounts how he established the Church of the Latter-day Saints

Fundamentalism In American Religion And Law

Author: David A. J. Richards
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139484133
Size: 46.55 MB
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Why, from Reagan to George Bush, have fundamentalists in religion and in law (originalists) exercised such political power and influence in the United States? Why has the Republican Party forged an ideology of judicial appointments (originalism) hostile to abortion and gay rights? Why and how did Barack Obama distinguish himself among Democratic candidates not only by his opposition to the Iraq war but by his opposition to originalism? This book argues that fundamentalism in both religion and law threatens democratic values and draws its appeal from a patriarchal psychology still alive in our personal and political lives and at threat from the constitutional developments since the 1960s. The argument analyzes this psychology (based on traumatic loss in intimate life) and resistance to it (based on the love of equals). Obama's resistance to originalism arises from his developmental history as a democratic, as opposed to patriarchal, man who resists the patriarchal demands on men and women that originalism enforces - in particular, the patriarchal love laws that tell people who and how and how much they may love.

Differing Visions

Author: Roger D. Launius
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252067310
Size: 23.40 MB
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The first serious attempt to analyze the careers of converts who later left the Mormon church, this book contains selections about 18 Mormon dissenters--David Whitmer, Fawn Brody, and Sonia Johnson, among them--contributed by Richard N. Holzapfel, John S. McCormick, Kenneth M. Godfrey, William D. Russell, Dan Vogel, Jessie L. Embry, and many others.

Vol Iv An Inaccessible Mormon Zion Expulsion From Jackson County

Author: JOHN J HAMMOND
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1477150900
Size: 40.49 MB
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AN INACCESSIBLE MORMON ZION:EXPULSION FROM JACKSON COUNTY This is Volume IV of an epic, multi-volume work entitled The Quest for the New Jerusalem: A Mormon Generation Saga, which combines family, Mormon, and American history, focusing upon how the author’s ancestors were affected by their conversion to the Mormon religion. In Volume I, four of the author’s ancestral families—the Carters, Hammonds, Knowltons, and Spencer’s—and the ancestors of Mormon Church founders Joseph Smith and Brigham Young are followed from the time they enter the Massachusetts Bay Colony in New England in the 1600s down to the early 1800s. Toward the end of Volume I, the focus is upon Joseph Smith and his family, including their move from Vermont to western New York and their religious and occult “magic worldviews.” Volume II takes up the narrative at about the year 1820, and involves a detailed, comprehensive, and critical look at the events in the life of Joseph Smith, Jr., during the decade in which he purportedly was visited by numerous heavenly messengers, received the “golden plates,” translated the writing on the plates to produce the Book of Mormon, received priesthood authority from other heavenly messengers, published the Book of Mormon, and organized the Mormon Church. There is a detailed examination of the contentious debate concerning the authenticity of the Book of Mormon and the validity of Smith’s 1820s visionary experiences. The later chapters describe the movement of Church headquarters from western New York to northeastern Ohio in early 1831, Smith’s interest in western Missouri as the site for his New Jerusalem/Zion, and the conversion of the author’s direct ancestor Simeon Daggett Carter. Volume III roughly covers Mormon history for the years 1831-33, and describes the influence of Sidney Rigdon and many other Ohio Campbellites (Disciples of Christ Church members) on the early Mormon Church. Numerous Joseph Smith revelations designate Jackson County, Missouri, as the New Jerusalem/Zion, the place where the Second Coming of Christ will soon take place. However, Smith chooses to live instead in Kirtland, Ohio, and serious disagreements and tensions develop between Smith in Ohio and Missouri Mormon leaders. Smith begins construction of a temple in Kirtland, and angry Missourians rise up in the summer of 1833 and violently expel the Mormons from Jackson County. They are given temporary sanctuary mainly in Clay County, located across the Missouri River to the north. Volume IV describes the expulsion of Mormons from Jackson County, the efforts of Missouri state officials to deal with the explosive situation, and Smith’s attempt to explain why his Missouri Zion is now off-limits to Mormons, although the Lord purportedly has designated it as the site for the hallowed New Jerusalem and imminent Second Coming of Christ. Smith recruits a Mormon army (“Zion’s Camp”) and leads it from Ohio to western Missouri in an unsuccessful effort to forcefully “redeem Zion,” and fourteen members of the camp die of cholera at the end of the trek, including one of the author’s Carter ancestors. There are serious recriminations against Smith within the Mormon Church on account of the total failure of this military venture, and a member of the Kirtland High Council—Sylvester Smith—brings formal charges against him. In the “trial,” however, the accuser quickly becomes the accused, and to avoid excommunication Sylvester is forced to apologize profusely for his “false accusations” against “The Prophet.” A disgruntled, excommunicated Mormon--Doctor Philastus Hurlbut--travels to western New York in late 1833 and collects numerous affidavits from residents of the Palmyra/Manchester area alleging that the young Joseph Smith, his father, and some of his brothers engaged in illegal, occult, “treasure-seer,” “treasurer-digging” activities during the 1820s, and were lazy and dishonest. Many of these affidavits are published by Pain