Nobody Knows My Name

Nobody Knows My Name

Told with Baldwin's characteristically unflinching honesty, this collection of illuminating, deeply felt essays examines topics ranging from race relations in the United States to the role of the writer in society, and offers personal accounts of Richard Wright, Norman Mailer and other writers.

Nobody Knows My Name

More Notes Of A Native Son

Nobody Knows My Name

Baldwin's early essays have been described as 'an unequalled meditation on what it means to be black in America' . This rich and stimulating collection contains 'Fifth Avenue, Uptown: a Letter from Harlem', polemical pieces on the tragedies inflicted by racial segregation and a poignant account of his first journey to 'the Old Country' , the southern states. Yet equally compelling are his 'Notes for a Hypothetical Novel' and personal reflections on being American, on oother major artists - Ingmar Bergman and Andre Gide, Norman Mailer and Richard Wright - and on the first great conferance of Negro - American writers and artists in Paris. In his introduction Baldwin descrides the writer as requiring 'every ounce of stamina he can summon to attempt to look on himself and the world as they are' ; his uncanny ability to do just that is proclaimed on every page of this famous book.

Nobody Knows My Name by Anonymous

Nobody Knows My Name by Anonymous

Elvis on "Ed Sullivan." The Internet in the '90s. The 21st century tabloid-goddess Kardashian sisters. If it happened in America over the last five decades, one man was there. So why isn't he famous? Then again, why aren't we all famous? Didn't Andy Warhol promise we would be? In this humorous book of short comedy pieces - stories, essays, sketches and spoofs - one man makes his case for fame and somehow manages to both succeed and fail. A sometimes silly, sometimes satirical romp through the last 50 years, this is a humor book that will keep you laughing while it restores your faith in America and the absurdity of Americans.

A Partisan Century

Political Writings from Partisan Review

A Partisan Century

For more than sixty years, Partisan Review has been the most influential literary and cultural journal in America, home to some of this century's finest writers. A Partisan Century now collects the journal's greatest political essays from the 1930s to the present. The list of writers collected here is a virtual who's who of American and European intellectual culture in the past half century. Leon Trotsky, James T. Farrell, Irving Howe, Hannah Arendt, Norman Mailer, C. Wright Mills, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Nat Hentoff, Steven Marcus, Andrei Sakharov, and many more. A Partisan Century gathers together some of the journal's most outstanding moments:from George Orwell's "London Letter," written when invasion by Nazi Germany seemed imminent; to Susan Sontag's 1964 essay, "Notes on 'Camp'," a harbinger to the age of postmodernism; to Steven Marcus's "Soft Totalitarianism," part of a rousing symposium on the effects of political correctness. On the subjects ranging from the Cold War tothe neoconservatives, from the war in Vietnam to revolutionaries in Romania, the writings in A Partisan Century are a barometer of the shifts in global politics in the twentieth century.

James Baldwin Now

James Baldwin Now

One of the most prolific and influential African American writers, James Baldwin was for many a harbinger of hope, a man who traversed the genres of art-writing novels, essays, and poetry. James Baldwin Now takes advantage of the latest interdisciplinary work to understand the complexity of Baldwin's vision and contributions without needing to name him as exclusively gay, expatriate, black, or activist. It was, in fact, Baldwin who said, "it is quite impossible to write a worthwhile novel about a Jew or a Gentile or a Homosexual, for people refuse . . . to function in so neat and one-dimensional a fashion." McBride has gathered a unique group of new scholars to interrogate Baldwin's life, his presence, and his political thought and work. James Baldwin Now finally addresses the man who spoke, and continues to speak, so eloquently to crucial issues of the twentieth century.

Collected Essays

Collected Essays

A comprehensive compilation of Baldwin's previously published, nonfiction writings encompasses essays on America's racial divide, the social and political turbulence of his time, and his insights into the poetry of Langston Hughes and the music of Earl Hines.

Concise Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

Concise Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

Provides coverage of literary and historical quotations. An easy-to-use keyword index traces quotations and their authors, while the appendix material, including Catchphrases, Film Lines, Official Advice, and Political Slogans, offers further topics of interest.

Country Music Records

A Discography, 1921-1942

Country Music Records

More than twenty years in the making, Country Music Records documents all country music recording sessions from 1921 through 1942. With primary research based on files and session logs from record companies, interviews with surviving musicians, as well as the 200,000 recordings archived at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum's Frist Library and Archives, this notable work is the first compendium to accurately report the key details behind all the recording sessions of country music during the pre-World War II era. This discography documents--in alphabetical order by artist--every commercial country music recording, including unreleased sides, and indicates, as completely as possible, the musicians playing at every session, as well as instrumentation. This massive undertaking encompasses 2,500 artists, 5,000 session musicians, and 10,000 songs. Summary histories of each key record company are also provided, along with a bibliography. The discography includes indexes to all song titles and musicians listed.

If Beale Street Could Talk

If Beale Street Could Talk

In this honest and stunning novel, now a major motion picture directed by Barry Jenkins, James Baldwin has given America a moving story of love in the face of injustice. Told through the eyes of Tish, a nineteen-year-old girl, in love with Fonny, a young sculptor who is the father of her child, Baldwin’s story mixes the sweet and the sad. Tish and Fonny have pledged to get married, but Fonny is falsely accused of a terrible crime and imprisoned. Their families set out to clear his name, and as they face an uncertain future, the young lovers experience a kaleidoscope of emotions–affection, despair, and hope. In a love story that evokes the blues, where passion and sadness are inevitably intertwined, Baldwin has created two characters so alive and profoundly realized that they are unforgettably ingrained in the American psyche.