Notes from a Small Island

Notes from a Small Island

After nearly two decades in Britain, Bill Bryson took the decision to move back to the States for a few years, to let his kids experience life in another country, to give his wife the chance to shop until 10 p.m. seven nights a week, and, most of all, because he had read that 3.7 million Americans believed that they had been abducted by aliens at one time or another, and it was thus clear to him that his people needed him. But before leaving his much-loved home in North Yorkshire, Bryson insisted on taking one last trip around Britain, a sort of valedictory tour of the green and kindly island that had so long been his home. His aim was to take stock of the nation's public face and private parts (as it were), and to analyse what precisely it was he loved so much about a country that had produced Marmite, a military hero whose dying wish was to be kissed by a fellow named Hardy, place names like Farleigh Wallop, Titsey and Shellow Bowells, people who said 'Mustn't grumble', and Gardeners' Question Time.

The Road to Little Dribbling

Adventures of an American in Britain

The Road to Little Dribbling

A loving and hilarious—if occasionally spiky—valentine to Bill Bryson’s adopted country, Great Britain. Prepare for total joy and multiple episodes of unseemly laughter. Twenty years ago, Bill Bryson went on a trip around Britain to discover and celebrate that green and pleasant land. The result was Notes from a Small Island, a true classic and one of the bestselling travel books ever written. Now he has traveled about Britain again, by bus and train and rental car and on foot, to see what has changed—and what hasn’t. Following (but not too closely) a route he dubs the Bryson Line, from Bognor Regis in the south to Cape Wrath in the north, by way of places few travelers ever get to at all, Bryson rediscovers the wondrously beautiful, magnificently eccentric, endearingly singular country that he both celebrates and, when called for, twits. With his matchless instinct for the funniest and quirkiest and his unerring eye for the idiotic, the bewildering, the appealing, and the ridiculous, he offers acute and perceptive insights into all that is best and worst about Britain today. Nothing is more entertaining than Bill Bryson on the road—and on a tear. The Road to Little Dribbling reaffirms his stature as a master of the travel narrative—and a really, really funny guy. From the Hardcover edition.

Bill Bryson the Complete Notes

Bill Bryson the Complete Notes

After nearly two decades in Britain, when Bryson took the decision to move Mrs Bryson, little Jimmy et al. back to the States, he made one last valedictory tour around old Blighty, resulting in Notes from a Small Island, a heartfelt eulogy to the country that produced Marmite, milky tea, Gardeners' Question Time and people who say, 'Mustn't grumble'. And while residing in New England to give his family a taste of the American way of life, he wrote the columns that became Notes from a Big Country, revealing the strange appeal of breakfast pizza, the jaw-slackening direness of US TV, and the answer to the puzzle of why nobody in America ever walks anywhere.

Notes from a Small Planet

Volume 1: India – Thailand – Vietnam – Cambodia – Australia (Big Oz) & New Zealand

Notes from a Small Planet

"About an hour out of Phnom Penh we are transferred onto a mini-bus which takes some time to arrive, but eventually comes. Then driven at breakneck speed on a very dusty road that gets dust all over everything, coming into the city is a bit of a shock as there is no doubt about it that the outer areas do resemble the Third world, but the inner city is clean and modern. We are taken to the King's Hotel where we could choose too stay or go - as I was tired I decided to stay, but without hot water in my cheap room - well what can you expect for 5 dollars. I shared dinner with Isabel and Jeroen - who I took a real shine too. And in the morning I have breakfast with Sarah from Sweden who I had first met in Chau Doc and came on our boat when partly through the trip. Sarah was one of these very assured intelligent young women who had done a lot of travelling – as breakfast progressed I kept thinking that her body language was saying categorically too me (was old enough to be her father) or probably any man who may have tried it on with her - that if you mess with me boy I will chew both of your testicles off with one bite. Apparently she was some sort of chemist who new a lot about food and what it does to us, when we eat it. I said very little while eating my breakfast and kept my legs very tightly together".

Accent on Privilege

English Identities and Anglophilia in the U.S.

Accent on Privilege

Accent on Privilege looks at the complexities of immigration, asking how native and immigrant construct race, gender, class and national identity. Katharine Jones investigates how white English immigrants live in the United States and how they use their status as privileged foreigners to gain the upper hand with Americans. Their privilege, she finds, is created by both American Anglophilia and the ways they perform their identities as "proper" English women and men in their host country. Jones looks at the cultural aspects of this performance: how English people play up their accents, "stiff upper lip," sense of humor and fashion - even the way they drink beer. The political and cultural ties between England and the US act as a backdrop for the identity negotiations of these English people, many of whom do not even consider themselves to be immigrants. This unique exploration of the workings of white privilege offers an important new understanding of the paradoxes of how class, gender, and race are formed in the US and, by implication, in the UK. Author note: Katharine W. Jones is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Philadelphia University.

Notes from a Big Country

Notes from a Big Country

From Perfectly Formed Potatoes To Adulterous Us Presidents, And From Domestic Upsets To Millennial Fever, Bill Bryson Just Cannot Resist Airing His Opinions And Standing Up For His (Mostly) Law-Abiding Fellow American Citizens. But Of Course After Twenty Years In England, He Is Now Back On The Other Side Of The Pond, And Is Obviously Having A Little Trouble Finding His True American Self Again.After Vigorous Exercise On The Appalachian Trail Comes This Edited Collection Of Bryson S Most Splenetic Comic Pieces Culled From His Humorous Regular Column In The Mail On Sunday.

English

English

This revision guide for Key Stage 3 English contains in-depth course coverage and advice on how to get the best results in the Year 9 National Test. It has progress check questions and exam practice questions.

The Complete Notes

The Complete Notes

"After nearly two decades in Britain, Bill Bryson took the decision to move Mrs Bryson, little Jimmy et al. back to the States for a while. But before leaving his much-loved Yorkshire, Bryson insisted on taking one last trip around old Blighty, a sort of valedictory tour of the green and kindly island that had for so long been his home. The resulting book, Notes from a Small Island, is a eulogy to the country that produced Marmite, George Formby, by-elections, milky tea, place names like Farleigh Wallop, Titsey and Shellow Bowells, Gardeners' Question Time and people who say, 'Mustn't grumble.' Britain will never seem the same again. Once ensconced back home in New Hampshire, Bryson couldn't resist the invitation to write a weekly dispatch for the Mail on Sunday's Night & Day magazine. Notes from a Big Country is a collection of eighteen months' worth of his popular columns about that strangest of phenomena - the American way of life. Whether discussing the dazzling efficiency of the garbage disposal unit, the exoticism of having your groceries bagged for you, or the mind-numbing frequency of commercial breaks on American TV, Bill Bryson brings his inimitable brand of bemused wi