The Literary Institution in Portugal Since the Thirties

An Analysis Under Special Consideration of the Publishing Market

The Literary Institution in Portugal Since the Thirties

Despite the numerous studies of the politics, economy, culture, and society of the "Estado Novo," the relations established between publishers, authors, and governmental institutions and their contribution to the making of the literary canon are still marginal subjects of analysis. Based on the systems theories developed by Bourdieu, Dubois and Even-Zohar, this study focuses on the cultural production produced during the "Estado Novo" (1933-1974) and after the Revolution (1974-2004), within their political, economic and social framework. The chapters on Jose Saramago and Jose Luis Peixoto show them as examples of literary consecration that confirm the systemic relations in the Portuguese literary field. This research makes use of a survey on habits of purchase of Portuguese fiction, interviews with publishers, original statistical analyses, and takes a new approach to the study of Portuguese literature."

The Collected Novels of José Saramago

The Collected Novels of José Saramago

This collection, available exclusively in e-book form, brings together the twelve novels (and one novella) of the great Portuguese writer José Saramago, with an introductory essay by Ursula Le Guin. From Saramago's early work, like the enchanting Baltasar & Blimunda and the controversial Gospel According to Jesus Christ, through his masterpiece Blindness and its sequel Seeing, to his later fables of politics, chance, history, and love, like All the Names and Death with Interruptions, this volume showcases the range and depth of Saramago’s career, his inimitable narrative voice, and his vast reserves of invention, humor, and understanding.

The Double

A Novel

The Double

A “wonderfully twisted meditation on identity and individuality” from a Nobel Prize–winning author who pushes fiction to its very limits (The Boston Globe). As this novel by the author of Blindness and All the Names begins, Tertuliano Máximo Afonso is a divorced, depressed history teacher. To lift his spirits, a colleague suggests he rent a certain video. Tertuliano watches the film, unimpressed. But during the night, when he is awakened by noise, he finds the VCR replaying the video and watches in astonishment as a man who looks exactly like him—or, more specifically, exactly like he did five years earlier, mustachioed and fuller in the face—appears on the screen. Against his own better judgment, Tertuliano decides to pursue his double. As he roots out the man’s identity, what begins as a whimsical chase becomes a probing investigation into what makes us human. Can we be reduced to our outward appearance, rather than the sum of our experiences? The inspiration for the film Enemy starring Jake Gyllenhaal and directed by Denis Villeneuve, The Double is a timeless novel from a writer John Updike described in The New Yorker as “like Faulkner, so confident of his resources and ultimate destination that he can bring any impossibility to life by hurling words at it.” “It’s tempting to think of [The Double] as his masterpiece.” —The New York Times Translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa

Portugal and Spain

Portugal and Spain

As neighbors and early rival nations, Portugal and Spain have been associated for much of their histories. Yet despite their geographic proximity on the Iberian Peninsula and shared past, each boasts distinct social, cultural, and economic identities. Readers will examine the evolution of each country, witnessing the rise of their earliest civilizations, their dramatic rivalry during the Age of Discovery, their days as empire-builders, their struggles through authoritarian regimes, and their emergence as independent nations and members of the European Union.

A Companion to Portuguese Literature

A Companion to Portuguese Literature

An essential chronological framework for students of Portuguese literature.

The Novels of José Saramago

Echoes from the Past, Pathways Into the Future

The Novels of José Saramago

Frier provides a comprehensive introduction to the novels of Portugal's best-known literary figure. He makes a significant contribution to the wider understanding of the author's writing in terms of its literary background, its socio-political significance, and its reflections on the human condition.

Science Education in Focus

Science Education in Focus

This is hardly another field in education which is more important for a country's future than science education. Yet more and more students elect to concentrate on other fields to the exclusion of science for a variety of reasons: 1. The perception of degree of difficulty, 2. The actual degree of difficulty, 3. The lack of perceived prestige and earnings associated with the field. 4. The dearth of good and easy to use texts. 5. The lack of society in comprehending the significance of science and creating attractive incentives for those who enter the field. This new book focuses on issues of primary significance in the field.

A Report on the Afterlife of Culture

A Report on the Afterlife of Culture

In A Report on the Afterlife of Culture, one of Canadas most provocative writers ranges across continents, centuries and linguistic traditions to examine how literary culture and our perception of history are changing as the world grows smaller. Weaving together daring literary criticism with front-line reporting on events such as the end of the Cold War in Poland, the plight of indigenous cultures in Mexico and Guatemala and African reactions to the G8 Summit, Henighan evokes a world where astonishing cultural riches flourish under siege from all-consuming commercialized uniformity. Whether illustrating in irreverent detail the reasons for the popularity of Ian McEwans Atonement, providing authoritative accounts of the work of writers such as Gabriel Garca Mrquez, Alice Munro, Haruki Murakami or Jos Saramago, writing with fresh insight on Cuban literary politics or the practice of literary translation, or intervening with forceful clarity in debates about the Giller Prize, book reviewing or Margaret Atwoods LongPen book-signing technology, Henighan is equally engaged with the word and the world. The work of a writer whose vision is simultaneously local and global, A Report on the Afterlife of Culture is entertaining and essential reading.