Original Intent

Author: David Barton
Publisher: Wallbuilders Press
ISBN: 9781932225266
Size: 59.19 MB
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"Discover how the United States supreme court has reinterpreted the constitution, diluting the biblical foundations upon which it was based. Filled with hundreds of the founders' quotes revealing their beliefs on the role of religion in public affairs, the proper role of the courts, the intended limited scope of federal powers, and numerous other current issues."

Religious Expression And The American Constitution

Author: Franklyn S. Haiman
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 0870139231
Size: 59.60 MB
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First Amendment rights have been among the most fiercely debated topics in the aftermath of 9/11. In the current environment and fervor for “homeland security,” personal freedoms in exchange for security are coming under more scrutiny. Among these guaranteed freedoms are the protection of religious expression given by the U.S. Constitution and the constitutional prohibitions against behaviors that violate the separation of church and state. The mandate that the government “shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof” is a general principle that has guided American courts in interpreting the original intent of the First Amendment. In Religious Expression and the American Constitution, Haiman focuses on the current state of American law with respect to a broad range of controversial issues affecting religious expression, both verbal and nonverbal, along with a review of the recent history of each issue to provide a full understanding.

Original Intent

Author: Derek Davis
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 43.82 MB
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Summarizes the views of the Chief Justice, and looks at the role of original intent in constitutional law

Religion And The Continental Congress 1774 1789

Author: Derek H. Davis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195350883
Size: 58.39 MB
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How did the constitutional framers envision the role of religion in American public life? Did they think that the government had the right to advance or support religion and religious activities? Or did they believe that the two realms should remain forever separate? Throughout American history, scholars, Supreme Court justices, and members of the American public have debated these questions. The debate continues to have significance in the present day, especially in regard to public schools, government aid to sectarian education, and the use of public property for religious symbols. In this book, Derek Hamilton Davis offers the first comprehensive examination of the role of religion in the proceedings, theories, ideas, and goals of the Continental Congress. Those who argue that the United States was founded as a "Christian Nation" have made much of the religiosity of the founders, particularly as it was manifested in the ritual invocations of a clearly Christian God as well as in the adoption of practices such as government-sanctioned days of fasting and thanksgiving, prayers and preaching before legislative bodies, and the appointments of chaplains to the Army. Davis looks at the fifteen-year experience of the Continental Congress (1774-1789) and arrives at a contrary conclusion: namely, that the revolutionaries did not seek to entrench religion in the federal state. Congress's religious activities, he shows, expressed a genuine but often unreflective popular piety. Indeed, the whole point of the revolution was to distinguish society, the people in its sovereign majesty, from its government. A religious people would jealously guard its own sovereignty and the sovereignty of God by preventing republican rulers from pretending to any authority over religion. The idea that a modern nation could be premised on expressly theological foundations, Davis argues, was utterly antithetical to the thinking of most revolutionaries.

Church State And Original Intent

Author: Donald L. Drakeman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521119189
Size: 29.90 MB
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This provocative book shows how the justices of the United States Supreme Court have used constitutional history, portraying the Framers' actions in a light favoring their own views about how church and state should be separated. Drakeman examines church-state constitutional controversies from the Founding Era to the present, arguing that the Framers originally intended the establishment clause only as a prohibition against a single national church.

One Nation Under God

Author: John D. Wilsey
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630876321
Size: 55.97 MB
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Is America a Christian nation? This question has loomed large in American culture since the Puritans arrived on American shores in the early seventeenth century. More recently, the Christian America thesis has been advocated by many evangelical leaders across the denominational spectrum. This book contributes to the conversation by critiquing, from an evangelical perspective, the idea that America is a Christian nation as articulated by specific writers over the past three decades. Wilsey asserts that the United States was not conceived as a Christian nation, but as a nation with religious liberty. Herein lies the genius of the Founders and the uniqueness of America.

The Warren Court

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 157607160X
Size: 62.41 MB
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Explores the era, justices, key events, and decisions in landmark Supreme Court cases under Chief Justice Earl Warren.

Religion And The American Constitutional Experiment

Author: John Witte, Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190459433
Size: 27.52 MB
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This accessible introduction tells the American story of religious liberty from its colonial beginnings to the latest Supreme Court cases. The authors provide extensive analysis of the formation of the First Amendment religion clauses and the plausible original intent or understanding of the founders. They describe the enduring principles of American religious freedom--liberty of conscience, free exercise of religion, religious equality, religious pluralism, separation of church and state, and no establishment of religion--as those principles were developed by the founders and applied by the Supreme Court. Successive chapters analyze the two hundred plus Supreme Court cases on religious freedom--on the free exercise of religion, the roles of government and religion in education, the place of religion in public life, and the interaction of religious organizations and the state. A final chapter shows how favorably American religious freedom compares with international human rights norms and European Court of Human Rights case law. Lucid, comprehensive, multidisciplinary, and balanced, this volume is an ideal classroom text and armchair paperback. Detailed appendices offer drafts of each of the religion clauses debated in 1788 and 1789, a table of all state constitutional laws on religious freedom, and a summary of every Supreme Court case on religious liberty from 1815 to 2015. Throughout the volume, the authors address frankly and fully the hot button issues of our day: religious freedom versus sexual liberty, freedom of conscience and its limitations, religious group rights and the worries about abuse, faith-based legal systems and their place in liberal democracies, and the fresh rise of anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, and anti-Christianity in America and abroad. For this new edition, the authors have updated each chapter in light of new scholarship and new Supreme Court case law (through the 2015 term) and have added an appendix mapping some of the cutting edge issues of religious liberty and church-state relations.

American Crossroads

Author: Jesse Wisnewski
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1621890430
Size: 59.44 MB
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Should Christians be concerned with faith and evangelism and not politcal affairs? In answering this question, American Crossroads provides a thought-provoking look at what it means to submit to the governing authorities of the United States of America. Just as God called for Christians to submit to the Roman government that forced its will upon the people (Rom 13:1), so too is God calling for us to submit to the existing form of government in the United States, a government that lives and thrives upon the will and involvement of people. Today, by submitting to the government, Christian citizens are led to influence the American political process that depends upon the involvement of all citizens for its well-being and survival.

In God We Trust Or Do We

Author: Glover Shipp
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1621890724
Size: 70.60 MB
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Out of a deep concern for our nation and its drift away from its Christian roots, Glover Shipp presents powerful proofs that it was founded on faith in God. He begins with the earliest colonial document, the Mayflower Charter, and traces the God theme throughout our history. In doing so, he draws on historical documents, monuments, songs, poems, and statements by well-known figures in our society. Unlike some other books of this kind, In God We Trust . . . or Do We? presents inaugural speeches by many of our presidents, private correspondence by leading figures in our nation, the constitutions of our fifty states, Supreme Court decisions that influence church-state relations, and references to God on our national monuments, in our national hymns, and in our poetry. Above all, Shipp points out the inconsistency between interpretations of The Establishment Clause and what really goes on in government. You will find In God We Trust . . . or Do We? a valuable resource for considering and defending the spiritual principles upon which our nation was founded.