Pandemic

Author: A. G. Riddle
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781788541299
Size: 28.79 MB
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DAY 01. MANDERA COUNTY, KENYA. A young man arrives at a remote hospital. He's burning with fever and barely conscious. He's also bleeding from his eyes. Fearing an Ebola-like outbreak, the World Health Organisation scrambles a rapid response team headed by leading epidemiologist Dr. Peyton Shaw. But what she finds in Kenya is beyond her worst fears. The world is facing an outbreak quite unlike anything previously documented. In just two weeks' time a disease with a 95 percent fatality rate will infect every corner of the planet. To find a cure, Dr. Shaw must trace the origin of the pathogen. But with each passing hour, her suspicions grow: this outbreak is no natural catastrophe. Pandemic will take you inside the world's response to a deadly epidemic, blending meticulously researched science and history with the pulse-pounding fiction that has made A.G. Riddle an international bestseller.

Genome

Author: A. G. Riddle
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781788541312
Size: 55.64 MB
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The X1 pandemic ravaged the world. Billions were infected, 30 million died. It was not an act of nature. X1 was man-made, a deadly plague deliberately released for one reason only: to force people to take the cure. But the cure is worse than the disease, a sophisticated nanotechnology that has the potential to enslave all humanity unless Dr Peyton Shaw can stop it. Dr Shaw's search for the culprits and a countermeasure starts at the ends of the Earth, on a sunken submarine beneath the Arctic ice. It will take her deep into humanity's past, towards an ancient secret encoded in our DNA, and a revelation that will rewrite history... The final thrilling installment of the Extinction Files will change your very understanding of what it means to be human, blending meticulous scientific research with the heart-pounding fiction that has made A.G. RIDDLE a global phenomenon.

American Pandemic

Author: Nancy Bristow
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190238550
Size: 15.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Between the years 1918 and1920, influenza raged around the globe in the worst pandemic in recorded history, killing at least fifty million people, more than half a million of them Americans. Yet despite the devastation, this catastrophic event seems but a forgotten moment in our nation's past. American Pandemic offers a much-needed corrective to the silence surrounding the influenza outbreak. It sheds light on the social and cultural history of Americans during the pandemic, uncovering both the causes of the nation's public amnesia and the depth of the quiet remembering that endured. Focused on the primary players in this drama--patients and their families, friends, and community, public health experts, and health care professionals--historian Nancy K. Bristow draws on multiple perspectives to highlight the complex interplay between social identity, cultural norms, memory, and the epidemic. Bristow has combed a wealth of primary sources, including letters, diaries, oral histories, memoirs, novels, newspapers, magazines, photographs, government documents, and health care literature. She shows that though the pandemic caused massive disruption in the most basic patterns of American life, influenza did not create long-term social or cultural change, serving instead to reinforce the status quo and the differences and disparities that defined American life. As the crisis waned, the pandemic slipped from the nation's public memory. The helplessness and despair Americans had suffered during the pandemic, Bristow notes, was a story poorly suited to a nation focused on optimism and progress. For countless survivors, though, the trauma never ended, shadowing the remainder of their lives with memories of loss. This book lets us hear these long-silent voices, reclaiming an important chapter in the American past.

Mother Jones Magazine

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 55.39 MB
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Mother Jones is an award-winning national magazine widely respected for its groundbreaking investigative reporting and coverage of sustainability and environmental issues.

Campbell Biology Australian And New Zealand Edition

Author: Jane B. Reece
Publisher: Pearson Higher Education AU
ISBN: 1486012299
Size: 37.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Over nine successful editions, CAMPBELL BIOLOGY has been recognised as the world’s leading introductory biology textbook. The Australian edition of CAMPBELL BIOLOGY continues to engage students with its dynamic coverage of the essential elements of this critical discipline. It is the only biology text and media product that helps students to make connections across different core topics in biology, between text and visuals, between global and Australian/New Zealand biology, and from scientific study to the real world. The Tenth Edition of Australian CAMPBELL BIOLOGY helps launch students to success in biology through its clear and engaging narrative, superior pedagogy, and innovative use of art and photos to promote student learning. It continues to engage students with its dynamic coverage of the essential elements of this critical discipline. This Tenth Edition, with an increased focus on evolution, ensures students receive the most up-to-date, accurate and relevant information.

Going Mutant The Bat Boy Exposed

Author: Neil McGinness
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451609097
Size: 46.55 MB
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The Weekly World News team uncovers the definitive and faux-tastic story of Bat Boy, from his hardscrabble origins in the caves of West Virginia to his global influence in the twenty-first century. Going Mutant reveals how Bat Boy has heeded a call to service that has embarrassed less forthcoming mutants: During the Gulf War, he deployed with the Special Forces. He later earned a special commendation from George W. Bush for his use of sonar, which led troops to the spider hole housing Saddam Hussein. And now Bat Boy joins forces with an unlikely crew of soldiers, scientists, and swamp mamas to battle a global pandemic that threatens to destroy our planet. This is an intimate look at the half-bat/half-boy, who has until now been shrouded in mystery (despite countless sightings and a megahit musical). Here, Bat Boy’s life is illuminated through a series of public and private documents obtained by the equally mysterious Dr. Barry Leed of the University of Indianapolis and through Weekly World News clippings. All this information comes together in this new Bitingsroman that reveals an archetypal American trickster who has risen from his lowly origins to become America’s favorite freedom fighter.

One Hundred And One Reasons Why I M A Vegetarian

Author: Pamela Rice
Publisher: Lantern Books
ISBN: 9781590560754
Size: 48.50 MB
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Most people have probably heard at least one reason-perhaps several-for adopting a vegetarian diet. 101 Reasons Why I'm a Vegetarian is a veritable one-stop shop for ethical, ecological, health-related, social, and economic arguments that challenge conventional views about what humans should eat. After conducting years of research in industry periodicals, government documents, expert opinion, and the mainstream media, Pamela Rice, founder of the Vegetarian Center of New York City, has built the strongest support of vegetarianism to date. A work of prodigious scholarship and dedication, presented with wit and skill, 101 Reasons Why I'm a Vegetarian is sure to become the handy reference work for vegetarians who want to give their meat-eating friends one book that explains why they do what they do, and for meat-eaters who want to understand all the arguments for a meatless diet. Book jacket.