Prufrock and Other Observations

Prufrock and Other Observations

Included in Prufrock and Other Observations are the following poems: The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Portrait of a Lady Preludes Rhapsody on a Windy Night Morning at the Window The Boston Evening Transcript Aunt Helen Cousin Nancy Mr. Apollinax Hysteria Conversation Galante La Figlia Che Piange

Prufrock and Other Observations

Prufrock and Other Observations

Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky Like a patient etherized upon a table; Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets, The muttering retreats Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels.

Prufrock and Other Observations - Scholar's Choice Edition

Prufrock and Other Observations - Scholar's Choice Edition

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Prufrock and Other Observations

Prufrock and Other Observations

This superb anthology by T. S. Eliot features The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, as well as a selection of other works from the poet's early career. The titular poem is steeped heavily in the Renaissance era literature with which T. S. Eliot was highly appreciative. The monologue is strongly inspired by readings of Dante Alighieri and William Shakespeare, poets whom deeply impacted Eliot during his youth and which he read meticulously. A work whose emotions include longing and regret, we hear Prufrock lament the missed opportunities and morose reflections of mortality which occupy his melancholic mind. For its eclectic embrace of past works in a monologue bursting with emotive depth, Prufrock was lauded as a triumphant work of the Modernist era. T. S. Eliot gained ample fame as a young literary, and would go on to author several other landmark poems throughout his life. Several of the other poems in this edition were previously unpublished when this edition first appeared in 1917. Prufrock itself had famously been published in Poetry: A Magazine of Verse in 1915, on the emphatic recommendation of Eliot's fellow literary Ezra Pound. Illustrative of the early style which Eliot sought to perfect, this anthology is a wonderful introduction to the poet, and a valuable reference for those familiar with his life's work.

Prufrock

And Other Observations (Classic Reprint)

Prufrock

Excerpt from Prufrock: And Other Observations And time yet for a hundred indecisions, And for a hundred visions and revisions, Before the taking of a toast and tea. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Waste Land/Prufrock and Other Observations

The Waste Land/Prufrock and Other Observations

The Waste Land is a long poem by T. S. Eliot, widely regarded as one of the most important poems of the 20th century and a central work of modernist poetry. Published in 1922, the 434-line poem first appeared in the United Kingdom in the October issue of The Criterion and in the United States in the November issue of The Dial. It was published in book form in December 1922. Among its famous phrases are "April is the cruellest month," "I will show you fear in a handful of dust," and the mantra in the Sanskrit language "Shantih shantih shantih." Eliot's poem loosely follows the legend of the Holy Grail and the Fisher King combined with vignettes of contemporary British society. Eliot employs many literary and cultural allusions from the Western canon, Buddhism and the Hindu Upanishads. Because of this, critics and scholars regard the poem as obscure. The poem shifts between voices of satire and prophecy featuring abrupt and unannounced changes of speaker, location, and time and conjuring of a vast and dissonant range of cultures and literatures. The poem's structure is divided into five sections. The first section, "The Burial of the Dead," introduces the diverse themes of disillusionment and despair. The second, "A Game of Chess," employs vignettes of several characters-alternating narrations-that address those themes experientially. "The Fire Sermon," the third section, offers a philosophical meditation in relation to the imagery of death and views of self-denial in juxtaposition influenced by Augustine of Hippo and eastern religions. After a fourth section, "Death by Water," which includes a brief lyrical petition, the culminating fifth section, "What the Thunder Said," concludes with an image of judgment. Eliot probably worked on the text that became The Waste Land for several years preceding its first publication in 1922. In a May 1921 letter to New York lawyer and patron of modernism John Quinn, Eliot wrote that he had "a long poem in mind and partly on paper which I am wishful to finish."[5] Richard Aldington, in his memoirs, relates that "a year or so" before Eliot read him the manuscript draft of The Waste Land in London, Eliot visited him in the country.[6] While walking through a graveyard, they discussed Thomas Gray's Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard. Aldington writes: "I was surprised to find that Eliot admired something so popular, and then went on to say that if a contemporary poet, conscious of his limitations as Gray evidently was, would concentrate all his gifts on one such poem he might achieve a similar success."[6] Eliot, having been diagnosed with some form of nervous disorder, had been recommended rest, and applied for three months' leave from the bank where he was employed; the reason stated on his staff card was "nervous breakdown." He and his first wife, Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot, travelled to the coastal resort of Margate, Kent, for a period of convalescence. While there, Eliot worked on the poem, and possibly showed an early version to Ezra Pound when, after a brief return to London, the Eliots travelled to Paris in November 1921 and stayed with him. Eliot was en route to Lausanne, Switzerland, for treatment by Doctor Roger Vittoz, who had been recommended to him by Ottoline Morrell; Vivienne was to stay at a sanatorium just outside Paris. In Hotel Ste. Luce (where Hotel Elite stands since 1938) in Lausanne, Eliot produced a 19-page version of the poem.[7] He returned from Lausanne in early January 1922. Pound then made detailed editorial comments and significant cuts to the manuscript. Eliot later dedicated the poem to Pound.

The Waste Land, Prufrock, and Others

The Waste Land, Prufrock, and Others

A selection of poems by twentieth-century writer T.S. Eliot, including the title work, the complete contents of the 1917 collection "Prufrock," and additional poems.

T. S. Eliot: The Poems

T. S. Eliot: The Poems

Introduces the poetry of T.S. Eliot, examines his major works, and discusses his style, symbolism, and themes

The Waste Land and Other Poems

The Waste Land and Other Poems

This volume brings together the full contents of Prufrock and Other Observations (1917), Poems (1920), and The Waste Land (1922), together with an informative introduction and a selection of background materials. Included as well are two of Eliot’s most influential essays, “Tradition and the Individual Talent” (1919) and “The Metaphysical Poets” (1921). As with other volumes in this series, the material appearing here is for the most part drawn from The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, acclaimed as “the new standard” in the field. Appendices include a wide range of contextual materials pertaining to Modernism; writings by Ezra Pound, H.D., and Mina Loy; reviews of The Waste Land; art by Wyndham Lewis; and excerpts from essays by Virginia Woolf and others.

A Reader's Guide to T. S. Eliot

A Poem-by-Poem Analysis

A Reader's Guide to T. S. Eliot

This poem-by-poem analysis has come to be regarded as an Tindispensable guide for readers interested in T. S. Eliot’s poetry. George Williamson treats his subject with great precision. Documenting his analyses with ample quotes from the poems and essays, he elucidates the structure and meaning of Eliot’s masterpieces. To make this guide more accessible, the poems are arranged in chronological order, as they appeared in The Complete Poems and Plays.