Quantum Mechanics: The Theoretical Minimum

Quantum Mechanics: The Theoretical Minimum

In The Theoretical Minimum, world-class physicist Leonard Susskind provided a brilliant first course in classical mechanics, offering readers not an oversimplified introduction but the real thing - everything you need to start doing physics, and nothing more. Now he returns with the next challenge that every aspiring physics buff must tackle: quantum mechanics. Unlike classical mechanics, quantum mechanics is not intuitive - it concerns things so small they are beyond the range of human senses. To understand quantum physics, you need to learn a whole new way of thinking, but then, Susskind reveals, you will discover that it is even more fundamental than classical mechanics. Unlike most popular physics books - which give readers a taste of what physicists know but not what they actually do - Susskind and his co-author Art Friedman teach the maths and equations that are essential to any real understanding of quantum mechanics. Combining crystal-clear explanations, witty and helpful dialogues, and basic exercises, Quantum Mechanics is, to paraphrase Einstein, as simple as possible, but no simpler.

The Conceptual Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

The Conceptual Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

In this book Jeffrey A. Barrett provides an introduction to the history and conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics. He begins with a description of classical mechanics and a discussion of the quantum phenomena that radically undermine our common-sense classical intuitions about how the physical world works. He then considers the physical and conceptual arguments that led to the standard von Neumann-Dirac formulation of quantum mechanics and how the standard theory explains quantum phenomena. This includes a discussion of how the theory's two dynamical laws work with the standard interpretation of states to explain determinate measurement records, quantum statistics, interference effects, entanglement, decoherence, and quantum nonlocality. A careful understanding of how the standard theory works ultimately leads to the quantum measurement problem. Barrett considers how this problem threatens the logical consistency of the standard theory and then turns to a discussion of the main proposals for resolving it. This includes collapse formulations of quantum mechanics, the various many-worlds theories, and Bohmian mechanics. In discussing alternative formulations he pays particular attention to the explanatory role played by each theory's empirical ontology and associated metaphysical commitments, and the conceptual trade-offs between theoretical options. The book is well-suited to those interested in physics and the history and philosophy of quantum mechanics.

The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

The Reality of Possibility

The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

A comprehensive treatment of the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics for researchers and graduate students in the philosophy of physics.

The Little Book of String Theory

The Little Book of String Theory

The Little Book of String Theory offers a short, accessible, and entertaining introduction to one of the most talked-about areas of physics today. String theory has been called the "theory of everything." It seeks to describe all the fundamental forces of nature. It encompasses gravity and quantum mechanics in one unifying theory. But it is unproven and fraught with controversy. After reading this book, you'll be able to draw your own conclusions about string theory. Steve Gubser begins by explaining Einstein's famous equation E = mc2, quantum mechanics, and black holes. He then gives readers a crash course in string theory and the core ideas behind it. In plain English and with a minimum of mathematics, Gubser covers strings, branes, string dualities, extra dimensions, curved spacetime, quantum fluctuations, symmetry, and supersymmetry. He describes efforts to link string theory to experimental physics and uses analogies that nonscientists can understand. How does Chopin's Fantasie-Impromptu relate to quantum mechanics? What would it be like to fall into a black hole? Why is dancing a waltz similar to contemplating a string duality? Find out in the pages of this book. The Little Book of String Theory is the essential, most up-to-date beginner's guide to this elegant, multidimensional field of physics.

Physics of Shock Waves and High–Temperature Hydrodynamic Phenomena

Physics of Shock Waves and High–Temperature Hydrodynamic Phenomena

Physics of Shock Waves and High-Temperature Hydrodynamic Phenomena, Volume II presents interpretations of the physical basis of shockwaves and high-temperature hydrodynamic phenomena and gives practical guidance to those who work with these subjects in science and modern technology. This volume contains chapters discussing such topics as the shockwave structure in gases; physical and chemical kinetics in hydrodynamic processes; the radiative phenomena in shock waves and in strong explosions in the air; thermal waves and shockwaves in solids; and self-similar processes in gasdynamics. Physicists, engineers, researchers, and professors and students in the field of the physical sciences will find the book very educational.

Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science 1964/1966

In Memory of Norwood Russell Hanson

Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science 1964/1966

This third volume of Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science contains papers which are based upon Colloquia from 1964 to 1966. In most cases, they have been substantially modified subsequent to presentation and discussion. Once again we publish work which goes beyond technical analysis of scientific theories and explanations in order to include philo sophical reflections upon the history of science and also upon the still problematic interactions between metaphysics and science. The philo sophical history of scientific ideas has increasingly been recognized as part of the philosophy of science, and likewise the cultural context of the genesis of such ideas. There is no school or attitude to be taken as de fining the scope or criteria of our Colloquium, and so we seek to under stand both analytic and historical aspects of science. This volume, as the previous two, constitutes a substantial part of our final report to the U. S. National Science Foundation, which has continued its support of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science by a grant to Boston University. That report will be concluded by a subse quent volume of these Studies. It is a pleasure to record our thanks to the Foundation for its confidence and funds. We dedicate this book to the memory of Norwood Russell Hanson. During this academic year of 1966-67, this beloved and distinguished American philosopher participated in our Colloquium, and he did so before.

Statistical Physics

Statistical Physics

This volume provides a compact presentation of modern statistical physics at an advanced level. Beginning with questions on the foundations of statistical mechanics all important aspects of statistical physics are included, such as applications to ideal gases, the theory of quantum liquids and superconductivity and the modern theory of critical phenomena. Beyond that attention is given to new approaches, such as quantum field theory methods and non-equilibrium problems.

The Development of Mathematics

The Development of Mathematics

Time-honored study by a prominent scholar of mathematics traces decisive epochs from the evolution of mathematical ideas in ancient Egypt and Babylonia to major breakthroughs in the 19th and 20th centuries. 1945 edition.