Secrecy

The American Experience

Secrecy

Traces the development of secrecy as a government policy over the twentieth century and its adverse effects on Cold War policy making

Secrecy and Deceit

The Religion of the Crypto-Jews

Secrecy and Deceit

Secrecy and Deceit documents the religious customs of the Iberian Jews who converted to Catholicism, largely under duress, in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Although many of the converts quickly melded into the Catholic mainstream, thousands of others and their descendents strove to preserve their Jewish culture despite the efforts of the Inquisition to suppress them. The book details crypto-Jewish culture in Spain, Portugal, and their American colonies, principally Mexico, Peru, and Brazil. The author uses Inquisition records, chronicles, rabbinical rulings, letters, eyewitness accounts, religious books, and other historical documents to give the most thorough and accurate picture of crypto-Jews ever cataloged. This book raises questions about living outside a Jewish community and what happens to religions of approximation.

The Genesis of Secrecy

On the Interpretation of Narrative

The Genesis of Secrecy

Analyzes in detail the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John to understand how meaning is concealed and how it is revealed

Secrecy

Report of the Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy

Secrecy

This is the highly controversial & much-publicized report that proposed changes for improving classification & declassification practices of the U.S. Government to protect the nation's secrets while still ensuring that the public has access to information on government operations. Explores the historical roots of current practices, the consequences for both the dissemination of information to the public & the sharing of info. within the Federal Government, the functioning of the bureaucracy that protects government secrets, the effort to promote greater accountability, & the various costs associated with protecting secrets & reducing secrecy. Charts & tables.

The Culture of Secrecy

Britain, 1832-1998

The Culture of Secrecy

This is the first, comprehensive study of secrecy in modern British history. Professor Vincent examines how and why secrets have been kept, and how systems of control have been constructed - and challenged - over the past hundred and sixty years. It is the only book to place current controversies over freedom of information in the context of the development of the liberal state since 1832.

Secrecy and Liberty

National Security, Freedom of Expression and Access to Information

Secrecy and Liberty

A. Notes on Editors.

The Law and Theory of Trade Secrecy

A Handbook of Contemporary Research

The Law and Theory of Trade Secrecy

This timely Handbook marks a major shift in innovation studies, moving the focus of attention from the standard intellectual property regimes of copyright, patent, and trademark, to an exploration of trade secrecy and the laws governing know-how, tacit knowledge, and confidential relationships. The editors introduce the long tradition of trade secrecy protection and its emerging importance as a focus of scholarly inquiry. The book then presents theoretical, doctrinal, and comparative considerations of the foundations of trade secrecy, before moving on to study the impact of trade secrecy regimes on innovation and on other social values. Coverage includes topics such as sharing norms, expressive interests, culture, politics, competition, health, and the environment. This important Handbook offers the first modern exploration of trade secrecy law and will strongly appeal to intellectual property academics, and to students and lawyers practicing in the intellectual property area. Professors in competition law, constitutional law and environmental law will also find much to interest them in this book, as will innovation theorists.

Secrecy

Secrecy

A sorcerer in wax. A fugitive. Haunted by a past he cannot escape. Threatened by a future he cannot imagine. Zummo, a Sicilian sculptor, is summoned by Cosimo III to join the Medici court. Late seventeenth-century Florence is a hotbed of repression and hypocrisy. All forms of pleasure are brutally punished, and the Grand Duke himself, a man for whom marriage has been an exquisite torture, hides his pain beneath a show of excessive piety. The Grand Duke asks Zummo to produce a life-size woman out of wax, an antidote to the French wife who made him suffer so. As Zummo wrestles with this unique commission, he falls under the spell of a woman whose elusiveness mirrors his own, but whose secrets are far more explosive. Lurking in the wings is the poisonous Dominican priest, Stufa, who has it within his power to destroy Zummo’s livelihood, if not his life. In this highly charged novel, Thomson brings Florence to life in all its vibrant sensuality, while remaining entirely contemporary in his exploration of the tensions between love and solitude, beauty and decay. When reality becomes threatening, not to say unfathomable, survival strategies are tested to the limit. Redemption is a possibility, but only if the agonies of death and separation can be transcended.

Government Secrecy

Government Secrecy

Divided into six sections, this title examines Government secrecy (GS) in a variety of contexts, including comparative examination of government control of information, new definitions, categories, censorship, ethics, and secrecy's relationship with freedom of information and transparency.

Victorian Secrecy

Economies of Knowledge and Concealment

Victorian Secrecy

Whether commercial, personal, political, professional, or spiritual, knowledge was capital for the Victorians in their ongoing project of constructing a modern information-based society. Victorian Secrecy explores the myriad ways in which knowledge was both zealously accumulated and jealously guarded by individuals, institutions, and government entities in Victorian Britain. Offering a wide variety of critical approaches and disciplinary perspectives, the contributors examine secretive actors with respect to a broad range of subjects, including the narrator in Tess of the d'Urbervilles, John Henry Newman's autobiographical novel Loss and Gain, Richard Dadd's The Fairy Feller's Masterstroke, modes of detection in Bleak House, the secret history of Harriet Martineau's role in the repeal of the Corn Law, and Victorian stage magicians. Taken together, the essays provide a richly textured account of which modes of hiding and revealing articulate secrets in Victorian literature and culture; how social relations are formed and reformed in relationship to secrecy; and what was at stake individually, aesthetically, and culturally in the Victorians' clandestine activities.