Shame

Author: Paul Gilbert
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195354140
Size: 59.34 MB
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One of the most commonly reported emotions in people seeking psychotherapy is shame, and this emotion has become the subject of intense research and theory over the last 20 years. In Shame: Interpersonal Behavior, Psychopathology, and Culture, Paul Gilbert and Bernice Andrews, together with some of the most eminent figures in the field, examine the effect of shame on social behavior, social values, and mental states. The text utilizes a multidisciplinary approach, including perspectives from evolutionary and clinical psychology, neurobiology, sociology, and anthropology. In Part I, the authors cover some of the core issues and current controversies concerning shame. Part II explores the role of shame on the development of the infant brain, its evolution, and the relationship between shame as a personal and interpersonal construct and stigma. Part III examines the connection between shame and psychopathology. Here, authors are concerned with outlining how shame can significantly influence the formation, manifestation, and treatment of psychopathology. Finally, Part IV discusses the notion that shame is not only related to internal experiences but also conveys socially shared information about one's status and standing in the community. Shame will be essential reading for clinicians, clinical researchers, and social psychologists. With a focus on shame in the context of social behavior, the book will also appeal to a wide range of researchers in the fields of sociology, anthropology, and evolutionary psychology.

Honor And Shame In The Gospel Of Matthew

Author: Jerome H. Neyrey
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN: 9780664256432
Size: 53.56 MB
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Jerome Neyrey clarifies what praise, honor, and glory meant to Matthew and his audience. He examines the traditional literary forms for bestowing such praise and the conventional grounds for awarding honor and praise in Matthew's world.

Shame

Author: Michael Lewis
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439105238
Size: 25.71 MB
Format: PDF
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Shame, the quintessential human emotion, received little attention during the years in which the central forces believed to be motivating us were identified as primitive instincts like sex and aggression. Now, redressing the balance, there is an explosion of interest in the self-conscious emotion. Much of our psychic lives involve the negotiation of shame, asserts Michael Lewis, internationally known developmental and clinical psychologist. Shame is normal, not pathological, though opposite reactions to shame underlie many conflicts among individuals and groups, and some styles of handling shame are clearly maladaptive. Illustrating his argument with examples from everyday life, Lewis draws on his own pathbreaking studies and the theory and research of many others to construct the first comprehensive and empirically based account of emotional development focused on shame. In this paperback edition, Michael Lewis adds a compelling new chapter on stigma in which he details the process in which stigmatization produces shame.

Shame

Author: Stephen Pattison
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521568630
Size: 53.78 MB
Format: PDF
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This book, first published in 2000, aims to understand the nature of shame as it relates to Christian thought and practice.

The Many Faces Of Shame

Author: Donald L. Nathanson
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 9780898627053
Size: 19.43 MB
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For almost a century the concept of guilt, as embedded in drive theory, has dominated psychoanalytic thought. Increasingly, however, investigators are focusing on shame as a key aspect of human behavior. This volume captures a range of compelling viewpoints on the role of shame in psychological development, psychopathology, and the therapeutic process. Donald Nathanson has assembled internationally prominent authorities, engaging them in extensive dialogue about their areas of expertise. Concise introductions to each chapter place the authors both historically and theoretically, and outline their emphases and contributions to our understanding of shame. Including many illustrative clinical examples, the book covers such topics as the relationship between shame and narcissism, shame's central place in affect theory, psychosis and shame, and shame in the literature of French psychoanalysis and philosophy.

Body Shame

Author: Paul Gilbert
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317822315
Size: 54.15 MB
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Physical appearance plays a powerful role in social relationships. Those who feel shame regarding the way they look, and who think others view their appearance negatively, can therefore be vulnerable to impoverished social relationships and a range of psychological difficulties. However, there are a few books which look specifically at the many permutations of body shame and their differing treatments. In this book, researchers and therapists from a wide range of different disciplines and areas explore the role of shame in various physical and psychological disorders, and provide practical advice on management and treatment. Chapters are organised to address issues of conceptualisation, assessment and treatment, on topics such as: * definitional controversies * possible biopsychosocial and evolutionary origins of body shame * effects on adjustment to maturation and aging process * specific forms of disfigurement * the role of body shame in depression, eating disorders and body dysmorphic disorder. Body Shame gives the reader insight into the nature and mechanisms of shame, how it can focus on the body, how it can underlie a variety of psychological difficulties, and how to intervene to help resolve it. This book will be invaluable for practitioners from different disciplines working with people who have problems centred on their physical appearance and/or functions, and clinicians working with various mental health problems.

Embodied Shame

Author: J. Brooks Bouson
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438427395
Size: 59.99 MB
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Examines how twentieth-century women writers depict female bodily shame and trauma.

Shame And The Origins Of Self Esteem

Author: Mario Jacoby
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415105804
Size: 80.18 MB
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Shame is one of our most central feelings and a universal human characteristic. Why do we experience it? For what purpose? How can we cope with excessive feelings of shame? In an elegant exposition informed by many years of helping people to understand feelings of shame, leading Jungian analyst Mario Jacoby provides a timely and comprehensive exploration of the many aspects of shame and shows how it occupies a central place in our emotional experience. Jacoby shows a lack of self-esteem is often at the root of excessive shame. As well as providing practical examples of how therapy can help, Jacoby draws upon a wealth of historical and cultural scholarship to show how important shame is for us in both its individual and social aspects.

Shame And Its Sisters

Author: Irving E. Alexander
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822316947
Size: 47.22 MB
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The question of affect is central to critical theory, psychology, politics, and the entire range of the humanities; but no discipline, including psychoanalysis, has offered a theory of affect that would be rich enough to account for the delicacy and power, the evanescence and durability, the bodily rootedness and the cultural variability of human emotion. Silvan Tomkins (1911–1991) was one of the most radical and imaginative psychologists of the twentieth century. In Affect, Imagery, Consciousness, a four-volume work published over the last thirty years of his life, Tomkins developed an ambitious theory of affect steeped in cybernetics and systems theory as well as in psychoanalysis, ethology, and neuroscience. The implications of his conceptually daring and phenomenologically suggestive theory are only now—in the context of postmodernism—beginning to be understood. With Shame and Its Sisters, editors Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Adam Frank make available for the first time an engaging and accessible selection of Tomkins's work. Featuring intensive examination of several key affects, particularly shame and anger, this volume contains many of Tomkins's most haunting, diagnostically incisive, and theoretically challenging discussions. An introductory essay by the editors places Tomkins's work in the context of postwar information technologies and will prompt a reexamination of some of the underlying assumptions of recent critical work in cultural studies and other areas of the humanities. The text is also accompanied by a biographical sketch of Tomkins by noted psychologist Irving E. Alexander, Tomkins's longtime friend and collaborator.

Scenes Of Shame

Author: Joseph Adamson
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791439760
Size: 35.42 MB
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Explores the role of shame as an important affect in the complex psychodynamics of literary and philosophical works.