Slavery By Another Name

Author: Douglas A. Blackmon
Publisher: Doubleday Books
ISBN: 0385506252
Size: 22.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1174
Download
Reveals how, from the late 1870s through the mid-twentieth century, thousands of African-American men were arrested and forced to work off outrageous fines by serving as unpaid labor to businesses and provincial farmers.

Prison And Slavery A Surprising Comparison

Author: John Dewar Gleissner
Publisher: John Dewar Gleissner
ISBN: 1432753835
Size: 29.33 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5160
Download
* The U.S. has 5% of the worlds population and 25% of its prisoners.* In 1840, the U.S. had 2,487,455 slaves.* In 2009, the U.S. had 2,424,279 prisoners of all races.* Today, African-Americans in the correctional population, including those on probation and parole, outnumber all U.S. slaves in 1850.* The modern American prisoner is 20 times more likely to commit suicide than the antebellum slave. A surprising comparison using thorough research proves that modern mass incarceration is an unrealized social and financial disaster of mammoth proportions while antebellum slavery for most U.S. slaves was not as inhumane as many believe. This historically accurate book contrasts the modern American prison system with antebellum slavery. You will hear from hundreds of ex-slaves in their own words and learn the gruesome facts about our modern correctional population of 7.3 million Americans. In the Old South, outlaws were generally white people, while slaves were considered safe and never incarcerated race and crime are not truly related. The author proposes racially neutral reforms to reduce and improve incarceration through discipline and hard work, substantially helping taxpayers, victims of crime, our new age slaves in prison and the American economy. This book contains the only practical market-oriented, faith-based solutions to what the NAACPs president now regards as the greatest major crisis in our democracy, mass incarceration. Forget stereotypes. The facts will surprise you.

American Corrections

Author: Todd R. Clear
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 130554465X
Size: 80.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4717
Download
Long at the forefront of the course and now in its Eleventh Edition, AMERICAN CORRECTIONS has been a trusted resource for introducing students to the dynamics of corrections in a way that captures their interest and encourages them to enter the field. Complete with valuable career-based material, insightful guest speakers, illuminating real-world cases, and uniquely even-handed treatment of institutional and community sanctions, the text examines the U.S. correctional system from the perspectives of both the corrections worker and the offender, providing students with the most well-rounded, balanced introduction to corrections available. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

At The Precipice

Author: Shearer Davis Bowman
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807895672
Size: 10.40 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6528
Download
Why did eleven slave states secede from the Union in 1860-61? Why did the eighteen free states loyal to the Union deny the legitimacy of secession, and take concrete steps after Fort Sumter to subdue what President Abraham Lincoln deemed treasonous rebellion? At the Precipice seeks to answer these and related questions by focusing on the different ways in which Americans, North and South, black and white, understood their interests, rights, and honor during the late antebellum years. Rather than give a narrative account of the crisis, Shearer Davis Bowman takes readers into the minds of the leading actors, examining the lives and thoughts of such key figures as Abraham Lincoln, James Buchanan, Jefferson Davis, John Tyler, and Martin Van Buren. Bowman also provides an especially vivid glimpse into what less famous men and women in both sections thought about themselves and the political, social, and cultural worlds in which they lived, and how their thoughts informed their actions in the secession period. Intriguingly, secessionists and Unionists alike glorified the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, yet they interpreted those sacred documents in markedly different ways and held very different notions of what constituted "American" values.

Beyond Nature S Housekeepers

Author: Nancy C. Unger
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199986002
Size: 20.33 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1660
Download
From pre-Columbian times to the environmental justice movements of the present, women and men frequently responded to the environment and environmental issues in profoundly different ways. Although both environmental history and women's history are flourishing fields, explorations of the synergy produced by the interplay between environment and sex, sexuality, and gender are just beginning. Offering more than biographies of great women in environmental history, Beyond Nature's Housekeepers examines the intersections that shaped women's unique environmental concerns and activism and that framed the way the larger culture responded. Women featured include Native Americans, colonists, enslaved field workers, pioneers, homemakers, municipal housekeepers, immigrants, hunters, nature writers, soil conservationists, scientists, migrant laborers, nuclear protestors, and environmental justice activists. As women, they fared, thought, and acted in ways complicated by social, political, and economic norms, as well as issues of sexuality and childbearing. Nancy C. Unger reveals how women have played a unique role, for better and sometimes for worse, in the shaping of the American environment.

Dissent

Author: Ralph Young
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479814520
Size: 28.24 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2666
Download
Finalist, 2016 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award One of Bustle's Books For Your Civil Disobedience Reading List Dissent: The History of an American Idea examines the key role dissent has played in shaping the United States. It focuses on those who, from colonial days to the present, dissented against the ruling paradigm of their time: from the Puritan Anne Hutchinson and Native American chief Powhatan in the seventeenth century, to the Occupy and Tea Party movements in the twenty-first century. The emphasis is on the way Americans, celebrated figures and anonymous ordinary citizens, responded to what they saw as the injustices that prevented them from fully experiencing their vision of America. At its founding the United States committed itself to lofty ideals. When the promise of those ideals was not fully realized by all Americans, many protested and demanded that the United States live up to its promise. Women fought for equal rights; abolitionists sought to destroy slavery; workers organized unions; Indians resisted white encroachment on their land; radicals angrily demanded an end to the dominance of the moneyed interests; civil rights protestors marched to end segregation; antiwar activists took to the streets to protest the nation’s wars; and reactionaries, conservatives, and traditionalists in each decade struggled to turn back the clock to a simpler, more secure time. Some dissenters are celebrated heroes of American history, while others are ordinary people: frequently overlooked, but whose stories show that change is often accomplished through grassroots activism. The United States is a nation founded on the promise and power of dissent. In this stunningly comprehensive volume, Ralph Young shows us its history. Teaching Resources from Temple University: Sample Course Syllabus Teaching Resources from C-Span Classroom Teaching Resources from Temple University

Freedom Road

Author: Ric Murphy
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 1496920503
Size: 45.63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2830
Download
FREEDOM ROAD is an historic account of America’s oldest recorded African American family, and their participation and rich contributions to American history over a four hundred year period. FREEDOM ROAD is a compilation of well-documented individual stories that begins in Africa in 1483, and from there, spans over fifteen generations and three continents, and definitively changes our understanding of American history, showcasing the significant role that one African American family has played from colonial American history to present day. This book is an exciting and compelling American saga that captivates readers with the story of the enslavement of John Gowen, one of the first Africans brought to America, and the first to be set free; the story of Thomas and Rebecca Cornell, forced to leave England because of their religious beliefs, and how they became known as the family of Presidents; and the story of the daring escape of Othello and Thomas Fraction from their cruel, vindictive slave master, himself the brother of a Confederacy Senator and the son of a Virginia governor. FREEDOM ROAD is enthralling, resounding, and evocative; it challenges the reader to have a better understanding of American history, and inspires them to learn about their own family history.

The New Plantation

Author: B. Hawkins
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 023010553X
Size: 52.85 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2332
Download
The New Plantation examines the controversial relationship between predominantly White NCAA Division I Institutions (PWI s) and black athletes, utilizing an internal colonial model. It provides a much-needed in-depth analysis to fully comprehend the magnitude of the forces at work that impact black athletes experiences at PWI s. Hawkins provides a conceptual framework for understanding the structural arrangements of PWI s and how they present challenges to Black athletes academic success; yet, challenges some have overcome and gone on to successful careers, while many have succumbed to these prevailing structural arrangements and have not benefited accordingly. The work is a call for academic reform, collective accountability from the communities that bear the burden of nurturing this athletic talent and the institutions that benefit from it, and collective consciousness to the Black male athletes that make of the largest percentage of athletes who generate the most revenue for the NCAA and its member institutions. Its hope is to promote a balanced exchange in the athletic services rendered and the educational services received.

In Remembrance Of Emmett Till

Author: Darryl Mace
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813145376
Size: 71.38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3377
Download
On August 28, 1955, fourteen-year-old Chicago native Emmett Till was brutally beaten to death for allegedly flirting with a white woman at a grocery store in Money, Mississippi. Roy Bryant and J. W. Milam were acquitted of murdering Till and dumping his body in the Tallahatchie River, and later that year, an all-white grand jury chose not to indict the men on kidnapping charges. A few months later, Bryant and Milam admitted to the crime in an interview with the national media. They were never convicted. Although Till's body was mutilated, his mother ordered that his casket remain open during the funeral service so that the country could observe the results of racially motivated violence in the Deep South. Media attention focused on the lynching fanned the flames of regional tension and impelled many individuals -- including Rosa Parks -- to become vocal activists for racial equality. In this innovative study, Darryl Mace explores media coverage of Till's murder and provides a close analysis of the regional and racial perspectives that emerged. He investigates the portrayal of the trial in popular and black newspapers in Mississippi and the South, documents posttrial reactions, and examines Till's memorialization in the press to highlight the media's role in shaping regional and national opinions. Provocative and compelling, In Remembrance of Emmett Till provides a valuable new perspective on one of the sparks that ignited the civil rights movement.

America S Irresistible Attraction

Author: John S. Dinga
Publisher: Trafford Publishing
ISBN: 1426961251
Size: 15.99 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 3509
Download
Part travelogue and part memoire, John S. Dingas newest book is a sequel to Navigating the Contradictions of America and explores disparities between Americas past and present, from the perspective of an immigrant. Featuring characters both real and fictional, Dinga shares his observations about the realities of making a new life in a new country, with an occasional flashback to the former home. The desire to immigrate to America is one shared by people all over the world, people who are often unaware of what it takes to thrive in a competitive, capitalist world where nothing is the same as before. Settling down in a new environment and navigating the politics and stresses of finding a job are just two of the aspects of culture shock a new immigrant will face. Expectations and responsibilities from those back home also add to the new immigrants challenges, and Dinga offers his suggestions on how to thrive under those stresses as well. He speaks not only to the potential immigrant but to those officials in power on either side of the process as well. Learning to make the right choices when presented with so many options is another life lesson addressed. The American society, freedoms, choices, and government are envied in many corners of the world, and Dinga explores how that perception influences the decision to start the journey. People need to know that living in America has its challengeschallenges not often imagined when the desire to immigrate pushes them to cross deserts, oceans, and unfriendly skies.