The Black Sleuth

The Black Sleuth

A novel featuring the first black detective in American fiction, boldly attacking white prejudice and racial injustice in the U.S. and abroad.

The Spanish Sleuth

The Detective in Spanish Fiction

The Spanish Sleuth

A history of Spanish detective fiction from Alarcon's "El clavo," published twelve years after Poe's "Murders in the Rue Morgue," up to the present. The presentation of the highly entertaining sleuth characters is based on a detailed examination of the works and, in many cases, personal interviews with the writers.

The Sound Sleuth

More Than 80 Phonics Activities for K-2

The Sound Sleuth


The Girl Sleuth

The Girl Sleuth

The author of Feather Crowns examines the girl detective in her various guises--including Cherry Ames, Nancy Drew, and Trixie Belden--in a work first published in 1975 recalling a rural youth spent longing for mysteries. Reprint. UP.

The Gay Male Sleuth in Print and Film

A History and Annotated Bibliography

The Gay Male Sleuth in Print and Film

This new edition of The Gay Male Sleuth in Print and Film provides an overview of milestones in the development of gay detectives over the last several decades. Also included in this volume is an annotated list of novels, short stories, plays, graphic novels, comic strips, films, and television series featuring gay amateur sleuths, police detectives, private investigators, and the like.

Girl Sleuth

Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her

Girl Sleuth

The true story behind the iconic fictional detective is “a fascinating chapter in the history of publishing” (The Seattle Times). An Edgar Award Winner for Best Biography and a Chicago Tribune Best Book of the Year The plucky “titian-haired” sleuth solved her first mystery in 1930—and eighty million books later, Nancy Drew has survived the Depression, World War II, and the sixties (when she was taken up with a vengeance by women’s libbers) to enter the pantheon of American culture. As beloved by girls today as she was by their grandmothers, Nancy Drew has both inspired and reflected the changes in her readers’ lives. Here, in a narrative with all the page-turning pace of Nancy’s adventures, Melanie Rehak solves an enduring literary mystery: Who created Nancy Drew? And how did she go from pulp heroine to icon? The brainchild of children’s book mogul Edward Stratemeyer, Nancy was brought to life by two women: Mildred Wirt Benson, a pioneering journalist from Iowa, and Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, a well-bred wife and mother who took over her father’s business empire as CEO. In this century-spanning, “absorbing and delightful” story, the author traces their roles—and Nancy’s—in forging the modern American woman (The Wall Street Journal). “It’s truly fun to see behind the scenes of the girl sleuth’s creation.” —Publishers Weekly “As much a social history of the times as a book about the popular series . . . Those who followed the many adventures of Nancy Drew and her friends will be fascinated with the behind-the-scenes stories of just who Carolyn Keene really was.” —School Library Journal “Sheds light on perhaps the most successful writing franchise of all time and also the cultural and historic changes through which it passed. Grab your flashlights, girls. The mystery of Carolyn Keene is about to begin.” —Karen Joy Fowler

Shaky, Breaky School Sleuth

Shaky, Breaky School Sleuth

Queeneka and Klaude are not very happy about their roles in the school play, Candy Dreams. They were both trying for the lead role and shy, quiet Javier beat them both! Things get even stickier at rehearsals when Klaude tries to remember his lines and Javier’s and when Queeneka adds more lines and solos to hers. No one is working as a team to make the play successful. That is, not until Javier goes missing on opening night! Can everyone work together to find Javier? Will Mrs. Holmes cancel the play? And who is that man hiding and lurking around the school? These mysteries are perfectly suited to keep readers guessing as they solve for clues. With longer sentences and fewer illustrations, they are just the right fit for your early fluent reader. • Extensive back matter • Underlying issues related to friends, family, and growing up • Keeps kids guessing with false clues

Angel Sleuth

Angel Sleuth

Kaitlin Singer needs time off-from a philandering husband, from a writing career stalled on a buzzard as a main character, and from the stash of chocolate in her lingerie drawer. Her decision to return to her childhood home might seem like the perfect way to get her life back together were it not for her mother foisting two visitors on her, guests who claim to be guardian angels. Perhaps not all is lost, for the angels might just be the companions she needs to help her solve the murder of a local newspaper columnist. To uncover clues to the crime, Kaitlin takes over the dead woman's work, writing the column as well as volunteering in the senior center, moves that put her in the path of the killer. She and her guests will need assistance from a pot-bellied pig and some pool skills to bring the murderer down.

Baseball Sleuth

Baseball Sleuth

“You buried the body in the yard?” These words, spoken to a man named Bob, crackle from the baby monitor. Phillip strains to hear more through the static. A murder! No one will believe him unless he finds out who Bob is, and where Bob lives. Phillip Crafts loves baseball but he is a terrible player. He loves mysteries, but his teammates laugh at him when he sees crimes where they don’t exist. Meanwhile, at home, his life is even worse. After twelve years of being an only child, Phillip's newborn sister has taken all of his mother's time, energy, and maybe even her love. And he is sure that he can never earn the respect of his “jock” stepfather. The only good thing in his life is his best friend Jackson, the girl next door. Armed with few clues, Phillip and Jackson work to unravel the mystery of the buried body. Their investigation builds to an exciting and dangerous climax, just as Phillip’s baseball season builds toward its final, dramatic game.