A History of Dolls' Houses

A History of Dolls' Houses

The fascination with miniature objects continues to grow. One of the most popular forms of "life in miniature" throughout the ages has been the doll's house, which appeals to a great variety of people, including architects, collectors, children, historians, and antiquarians. A doll's house is a miniature representation of its place and time, and this fascinating account of dolls' houses and miniature furnishings covers four centuries and many countries: Holland, Germany, France, England, the United States. Additional information on examples of Scandinavian, Italian, Swiss, and Japanese houses is provided. World famous dolls' houses described at length include Queen Mary's doll house, complete in every detail down to miniature bottles of real champagne in the wine cellar; Colleen Moore's spectacular castle with its diamond chandelier and gold (monogrammed!) forks and knives; Titania's Palace which has been called "a museum-in-little of Italian art"; the Stettheimer doll house with its unique art gallery of miniature originals by famous modern artists.--P. [4] of cover.

Making and Dressing Doll House Dolls

Making and Dressing Doll House Dolls

A comprehensive guide to making and dressing dolls from master craftswoman and miniaturist Sue Atkinson, featuring - expert tips on producing professional results; - hundreds of patterns for clothes from every era; - superb photography of the finished dolls and outfits in period settings.

Victorian Shopping

Victorian Shopping

Brings together the stories and facts of a life very different from what we know today but which played a fascinating part in the development of what has been called a nation of shopkeepers (UK)

Interactive Books

Playful Media before Pop-Ups

Interactive Books

Movable books are an innovative area of children’s publishing. Commonly equated with spectacular pop-ups, movable books have a little-known history as interactive, narrative media. Since they are hybrid artifacts consisting of words, images and movable components, they cross the borders between story, toy, and game. Interactive Books is a historical and comparative study of early movable books in relation to the children who engage with them. Jacqueline Reid-Walsh focuses on the period movable books became connected with children from the mid-17th to the early-19th centuries. In particular, she examines turn-up books, paper doll books, and related hybrid experiments like toy theaters and paignion (or domestic play set) produced between 1650 and 1830. Despite being popular in their own time, these artifacts are little known today. This study draws attention to a gap in our knowledge of children’s print culture by showing how these artifacts are important in their own right. Reid-Walsh combines archival research with children’s literature studies, book history, and juvenilia studies. By examining commercially produced and homemade examples, she explores the interrelations among children, interactive media, and historical participatory culture. By drawing on both Enlightenment thinkers and contemporary digital media theorists Interactive Books enables us to think critically about children’s media texts paper and digital, past and present.

Penelope Fitzgerald

A Life

Penelope Fitzgerald

Winner of the James Tait Black Prize for Biography 2014 Winner of the Plutarch Award for Best Biography New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Books of the Year Penelope Fitzgerald (1916–2000) was a great English writer, who would never have described herself in such grand terms. Her novels were short, spare masterpieces, self-concealing, oblique and subtle. She won the Booker Prize for her novel Offshore in 1979, and her last work, The Blue Flower, was acclaimed as a work of genius. The early novels drew on her own experiences – a boat on the Thames in the 1960s; the BBC in war time; a failing bookshop in Suffolk; an eccentric stage-school. The later ones opened out to encompass historical worlds which, magically, she seemed to possess entirely: Russia before the Revolution; post-war Italy; Germany in the time of the Romantic writer Novalis. Fitzgerald’s life is as various and as cryptic as her fiction. It spans most of the twentieth century, and moves from a Bishop’s Palace to a sinking barge, from a demanding intellectual family to hardship and poverty, from a life of teaching and obscurity to a blaze of renown. She was first published at sixty and became famous at eighty. This is a story of lateness, patience and persistence: a private form of heroism. Loved and admired, and increasingly recognised as one of the outstanding novelists of her time, she remains, also, mysterious and intriguing. She liked to mislead people with a good imitation of an absent-minded old lady, but under that scatty front were a steel-sharp brain and an imagination of wonderful reach. This brilliant account – by a biographer whom Fitzgerald herself admired – pursues her life, her writing, and her secret self, with fascinated interest.

The Squirrel Chair

The Squirrel Chair

Chelsea lives thousands of miles away from her family, where she lives blissfully devoid of harsh realities. She's built an idyllic new life in Hawaii, surrounded by art, love, nature, and the many pleasures of island living. This happiness is derailed by the news of her father's battle with cancer. Torn between duty and fear, she takes a leave of absence to be by his side. Leaving her husband, her career, and her detachment from reality behind, Chelsea boards a flight back to her hometown in New York. She doesn't know exactly how she'll navigate this new path, one now defined by uncertainty and the heartbreak of impending, inescapable, and unimaginable loss. She relies on her wit and keen observation of human fragility and strength to explore both the tragic and quirky circumstances surrounding death. Pulled from the comfortable delusions of her island life, she's out of her realm, out of her depth, and definitely out of her comfort zone. Life is chaos.

Hammer Complete

The Films, the Personnel, the Company

Hammer Complete

Think you know everything there is to know about Hammer Films, the fabled "Studio that Dripped Blood?" The lowdown on all the imperishable classics of horror, like The Curse of Frankenstein, Horror of Dracula and The Devil Rides Out? What about the company's less blood-curdling back catalog? What about the musicals, comedies and travelogues, the fantasies and historical epics--not to mention the pirate adventures? This lavishly illustrated encyclopedia covers every Hammer film and television production in thorough detail, including budgets, shooting schedules, publicity and more, along with all the actors, supporting players, writers, directors, producers, composers and technicians. Packed with quotes, behind-the-scenes anecdotes, credit lists and production specifics, this all-inclusive reference work is the last word on this cherished cinematic institution.

Passport's Guide to the Best of Scotland

Passport's Guide to the Best of Scotland

Featuring a thorough introduction and history of the area, plus an easy-to-follow gazetteer for each region, Passport's Guide to the Best of Scotland provides detailed information on hotels and restaurants in all price ranges, sightseeing opportunities, and more. Maps.