Sojourning For Freedom

Author: Erik S. McDuffie
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822350505
Size: 48.99 MB
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Illuminates a pathbreaking black radical feminist politics forged by black women leftists active in the U.S. Communist Party between its founding in 1919 and its demise in the 1950s.

Challenging The Legacies Of Racial Resentment

Author: Julia Jordan-Zachery
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412863945
Size: 73.31 MB
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Domestic and international health activism and health policy are focal points in this volume, a publication of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. This work demonstrates the continuing importance of the “medical civil rights movement,” through examples of activism of women of color in AIDS service organizations, of their health issues, and of the struggle for racial equity in health care in Brazil. Spikes in police and vigilante violence, as well as fear of a reversion to resegregated schools have brought a new urgency to black political activism. The contributors explore the effect of race on American attitudes toward immigration policy and reform, black state legislators and American morality politics, the historically disproportionate influence of Southern whites in American politics, and the undermining of school desegregation laws with “nullification” strategies. The volume’s Trends section features conversations on the #BlackLivesMatter movement in Los Angeles, the 2016 presidential election, and examines the teaching of the Trayvon Martin story at the University of California, Irvine. The volume also includes a diverse selection of book reviews.

Communist Rhetoric And Feminist Voices In Cold War America

Author: Jennifer Keohane
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498549829
Size: 36.82 MB
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This book explores how women within the male-dominated Communist Party in the United States built a home for feminist ideology and practice during the early Cold War. It explores how, in pamphlets, articles, and petitions, women carefully crafted voices that spoke to the party’s concerns while challenging its theoretical and practical limitations.

Remaking Black Power

Author: Ashley D. Farmer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469634384
Size: 65.37 MB
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In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that sexism relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created--the "Militant Black Domestic," the "Revolutionary Black Woman," and the "Third World Woman," for instance--spurred debate among activists over the importance of women and gender to Black Power organizing, causing many of the era's organizations and leaders to critique patriarchy and support gender equality. Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women's artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life.

Toward An Intellectual History Of Black Women

Author: Mia E. Bay
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469620928
Size: 48.20 MB
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Despite recent advances in the study of black thought, black women intellectuals remain often neglected. This collection of essays by fifteen scholars of history and literature establishes black women's places in intellectual history by engaging the work of writers, educators, activists, religious leaders, and social reformers in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean. Dedicated to recovering the contributions of thinkers marginalized by both their race and their gender, these essays uncover the work of unconventional intellectuals, both formally educated and self-taught, and explore the broad community of ideas in which their work participated. The end result is a field-defining and innovative volume that addresses topics ranging from religion and slavery to the politicized and gendered reappraisal of the black female body in contemporary culture. Contributors are Mia E. Bay, Judith Byfield, Alexandra Cornelius, Thadious Davis, Corinne T. Field, Arlette Frund, Kaiama L. Glover, Farah J. Griffin, Martha S. Jones, Natasha Lightfoot, Sherie Randolph, Barbara D. Savage, Jon Sensbach, Maboula Soumahoro, and Cheryl Wall.

The Other Blacklist

Author: Mary Helen Washington
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231526474
Size: 51.75 MB
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Mary Helen Washington recovers the vital role of 1950s leftist politics in the works and lives of modern African American writers and artists. While most histories of McCarthyism focus on the devastation of the blacklist and the intersection of leftist politics and American culture, few include the activities of radical writers and artists from the Black Popular Front. Washington's work incorporates these black intellectuals back into our understanding of mid-twentieth-century African American literature and art and expands our understanding of the creative ferment energizing all of America during this period. Mary Helen Washington reads four representative writers—Lloyd Brown, Frank London Brown, Alice Childress, and Gwendolyn Brooks—and surveys the work of the visual artist Charles White. She traces resonances of leftist ideas and activism in their artistic achievements and follows their balanced critique of the mainstream liberal and conservative political and literary spheres. Her study recounts the targeting of African American as well as white writers during the McCarthy era, reconstructs the events of the 1959 Black Writers' Conference in New York, and argues for the ongoing influence of the Black Popular Front decades after it folded. Defining the contours of a distinctly black modernism and its far-ranging radicalization of American politics and culture, Washington fundamentally reorients scholarship on African American and Cold War literature and life.

Radical Moves

Author: Lara Putnam
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807838136
Size: 46.70 MB
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In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the cane fields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black-internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century. From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or "jazzing," writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created--from Marcus Garvey's UNIA to "regge" dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis's worldwide fandom--still echoes in the present.

London Is The Place For Me

Author: Kennetta Hammond Perry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190240210
Size: 48.63 MB
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Black people in the British Empire have long challenged the notion that "there ain't no black in the Union Jack." For the post-World War II wave of Afro-Caribbean migrants, many of whom had long been subjects of the Empire, claims to a British identity and imperial citizenship were considered to be theirs by birthright. However, while Britain was internationally touted as a paragon of fair play and equal justice, they arrived in a nation that was frequently hostile and unwilling to incorporate Black people into its concept of what it meant to be British. Black Britons therefore confronted the racial politics of British citizenship and became active political agents in challenging anti-Black racism. In a society with a highly racially circumscribed sense of identity-and the laws, customs, and institutions to back it up-Black Britons had to organize and fight to assert their right to belong. In London Is The Place for Me, Kennetta Hammond Perry explores how Afro-Caribbean migrants navigated the politics of race and citizenship in Britain and reconfigured the boundaries of what it meant to be both Black and British at a critical juncture in the history of Empire and twentieth century transnational race politics. She situates their experience within a broader context of Black imperial and diasporic political participation, and examines the pushback-both legal and physical-that the migrants' presence provoked. Bringing together a variety of sources including calypso music, photographs, migrant narratives, and records of grassroots Black political organizations, London Is the Place for Me positions Black Britons as part of wider public debates both at home and abroad about citizenship, the meaning of Britishness and the politics of race in the second half of the twentieth century. The United Kingdom's postwar discriminatory curbs on immigration and explosion of racial violence forced White Britons as well as Black to question their perception of Britain as a racially progressive society and, therefore, to question the very foundation of their own identities. Perry's examination expands our understanding of race and the Black experience in Europe and uncovers the critical role that Black people played in the formation of contemporary British society.

New Perspectives On The Black Atlantic

Author: Bénédicte Ledent
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 77.45 MB
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This collection of essays attempts to expand the notion of the «Black Atlantic» beyond its original racial, geographical, linguistic and cultural borders while acknowledging its remarkable ability to disturb established historical truths and to go beyond traditional dichotomies, thereby providing an essential tool for cross-cultural understanding. It is divided into four sections, each of them dealing with a different approach to the question of the «Black Atlantic». «Definitions» touches on the various limitations of Gilroy's original concept. «Readings» focuses on how the «Black Atlantic» can be productively used in readings of certain literary texts. «Practices» shifts towards the practical applications of the concept in order to explore the impact it has had on academic disciplines and examine to what extent it may have altered their epistemology and working procedures. Finally, «Dialogues» engages with the «Black Atlantic» from the perspectives of two creative writers whose work includes transatlantic themes and characters.