Southern Bastards Vol. 3: Homecoming

Southern Bastards Vol. 3: Homecoming

The Craw County Runnin Rebs are gearing up for the most important and bloody game of the year. Everyone in town has a stake in it. Six stories. Six bastards. One southern-fried crime series. Collects SOUTHERN BASTARDS #9-14

Southern Bastards Volume 2

Gridiron

Southern Bastards Volume 2

Sheriff "Big Bert" Tubb once cleaned up Craw County, Alabama with an iron jaw and a big ol' stick. But that was 40 years ago. When his son, Earl Tubb, returns home to settle some family business, he finds his daddy's grave unkempt, the stick he was buried with grown into a gnarled old tree, and Craw County in worse shape than ever. Then that tree gets struck by lightning. And suddenly Earl has a stick of his own. And some questions he'd like answered. The hit new crime series, Southern Bastards, returns for its second volume, as Jason Aaron (Scalped, Thor, Star Wars) and Jason Latour (Wolverine & the X-Men, Loose Ends) pull back the curtain on the dark and seedy history of Craw County and its most famous and feared resident, the high school football coach turned backwoods crime lord, Euless Boss. In a place where only bastards flourish, what does it take to be the biggest, meanest, most powerful bastard of them all? Only Coach Boss knows. But if I was you, I wouldn't ask him. Collects Southern Bastards #5-8.

Homecoming

Homecoming

"Originally published in single-magazine form as Southern Bastards #9-14."--Copyright page.

Southern Bastards Vol. 2: Gridiron

Southern Bastards Vol. 2: Gridiron

The hit new crime series SOUTHERN BASTARDS returns for its second volume, as JASON AARON (Scalped, Thor, Star Wars) and JASON LATOUR (Spider-Gwen, Loose Ends) pull back the curtain on the dark and seedy history of Craw County and its most famous and feared resident, the high school football coach turned backwoods crime lord Euless Boss. Collects SOUTHERN BASTARDS #5-9.

Southern Bastards

Southern Bastards

Coach Boss holds sway over Craw County for one reason:he wins football games. But after the biggest, ugliest loss of his career, thecoach must become more of a criminal than ever before, if he's gonna keep aheadof his enemies. Enemies like Roberta Tubb,who's come to town with a machine gun and some serious questions about how herdaddy died. The 2015Harvey Award-winning (Best New Series) and 2016 Eisner Award-winning (BestContinuing Series) southern-fried crime comic by JASON AARON & JASON LATOURis back for another round of football, BBQ, and bloodshed!

Listen Here

Women Writing in Appalachia

Listen Here

Many combat veterans refuse to discuss their experiences on the line. With the passage of time and the unreliability of memory, it becomes difficult to understand the true nature of war. In The Line: Combat in Korea, January–February 1951, retired Army colonel William T. Bowers uses firsthand, eyewitness accounts of the Korean War to offer readers an intimate look at the heroism and horror of the battlefront. These interviews of soldiers on the ground are particularly telling because they were conducted by Army historians immediately following combat. Known as the “forgotten war,” the action in Korea lasted from June 1950 until July 1953 and was particularly savage for its combatants. During the first few months of the war, American and U.N. soldiers conducted rapid advances and hasty withdrawals, risky amphibious landings and dangerous evacuations, all while facing extreme weather conditions. In early 1951, the first winter of the war, frigid cold and severe winds complicated combat operations. As U.N. forces in Korea retreated from an oncoming Chinese and North Korean attack, U.S. commanders feared they would be forced to withdraw from occupation and admit to a Communist victory. Using interviews and extensive historical research, The Line analyzes how American troops fought the enemy to a standstill over this pivotal two-month period, reversing the course of the war. In early 1951, the war had nearly been lost, but by February’s end, there existed the possibility of preserving an independent South Korea. Bowers compellingly illustrates how a series of small successes at the regiment, battalion, company, platoon, squad, and soldier levels ensured that the line was held against the North Korean enemy. The Line is the first of three volumes detailing combat during the Korean War. Each book focuses on the combat experiences of individual soldiers and junior leaders. Bowers enhances our understanding of combat by providing explanatory analysis and supplemental information from official records, giving readers a complete picture of combat operations in this understudied theatre. Through searing firsthand accounts and an intense focus on this brief but critical time frame, The Line offers new insights into U.S. military operations during the twentieth century and guarantees that the sacrifices of these courageous soldiers will not be lost to history.

The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature

The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature

The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, which now appears in a fully revised and updated second edition, provides a concise but comprehensive account of Australian writing from European settlement in 1788 to 1993. Its chief aim is to present the most important achievements of Australianliterature in the major fields of poetry, fiction and drama, but considerable attention has also been paid to non-fictional prose and to the impact on Australian literature of those historical events which served not only as catalysts but also as the subject matter of so much of it.William Wilde and Joy Hooton - building on the 1985 edition which was co-authored by the late Barry Andrews - present an even more diverse record of literary achievement. The new Companion reflects three major changes in the literary culture: the emergence of Aboriginal writing, the increase in andrecognition of multicultural writing, and the great increase in women's writing in all genres. The new edition also relects the substantial research achievements of literary historians, textual critics, bibliographers, biographers and the impact of critical reinterpretations based on such 'new'approaches as feminism and post-colonialism.Every entry has been reappraised and, where necessary, revised and expanded. During the 1980s several Australian writers won international reputations. Many of them - Malouf, Garner, Murray, Jolley, Carey and Williamson - produced some of their key works after the first edition of the Companion wascompleted, and their entries have been rewritten accordingly. In addition, a new generation of writers has been included - Brett, Halligan, Henshaw, Castro, Grenville, Masters and Hodgins, to name just a few.Reviewing the first edition, A.D. Hope acclaimed it as a 'landmark'. In the greatly expanded second edition, the authors provide a fuller and more contemporary record of the national literature.