Strangers in Paradise Book 2

I Dream of You

Strangers in Paradise Book 2

Chronicles the relationship between three friends--Katchoo, Francine, and David--and the people they fall in and out of love with, in a story of dark pasts, hopeful futures, double-crosses, and true friendship.

Strangers in Paradise

Strangers in Paradise

Chronicles the relationship between three friends--Katchoo, Francine, and David--and the people they fall in and out of love with.

Strangers in Paradise

Strangers in Paradise

The greatest love story ever told is finally available in an affordable, softcover omnibus edition! This two-book package contains all 2,128 pages of Terry Moore's epic tale featuring Katchoo, Francine, David, and Casey as they face life's biggest challenges by facing them together. All 107 issues of the Strangers In Paradise series are here, including the spin-offs Molly & Poo, Princess Warrior, When World's Collide, and David's Story.

The Collected Strangers in Paradise

The Collected Strangers in Paradise

Chronicles the relationship between three friends--Katchoo, Francine, and David--and the people they fall in and out of love with, in a story of dark pasts, hopeful futures, double-crosses, and true friendship.

Countdown to Armageddon / A Stranger in Paradise (Wildside Double #2)

Countdown to Armageddon / A Stranger in Paradise (Wildside Double #2)

In the tradition of the old "Ace Doubles" two-in-one books (flip one over to read the second title) -- here is the second Wildside Double . . . "Countdown to Armageddon," by Edward M. Lerner: Hezbollah has obtained an atomic bomb and a would-be martyr eager to deliver it-and that's the good news. The bad news, unknown even to Hezbollah, is that their physicist has also found a way to take his new bomb back to a turning point in European history. Harry Bowen, an American physicist, and Terrence Ambling, a British agent turned historian, are determined to stop Abdul Faisel and prevent the nullification of all Western civilization. Their mission can be accomplished, if at all, only in the darkest of the Dark Ages- And there, too, time is running out. "A Stranger in Paradise," by Edward M. Lerner, collects five of the bestselling author's science fiction stories: "The Night of the RFIDs," "Two kinds of People," "Better the Devil You Know," "Small Business," and "A Stranger in Paradise."

Strangers in Paradise

Academics from the Working Class

Strangers in Paradise

In this second edition, twenty-four college professors, with roots in the working class, discuss the experience of significant upward mobility and the problems of adjustment to life in the academy. This collection of stories provides revelations about the social class system and academic life in the United States. Each of the autobiographies is prefaced with thoughtful discussions of how certain historical forces have affected the experiences of working class academics and how the United States' social class system is tied to higher education. The book connects these twenty-four personal experiences with three themes. First is the dual estrangement theme, whereby the upwardly mobile person lives in two very different worlds. The second theme explores internalized class conflict, where in many cases the different worlds are in serious conflict with each other. Finally the impostor phenomenon theme describes the event of an upwardly mobile person surviving the new environment by becoming someone else all the time. Strangers in Paradise will provide excellent text for courses and seminars in sociology, economics, and education. In addition, almost any person in the academy with working class roots will find some personal interest in this probing and relevant analysis.

New Strangers in Paradise

The Immigrant Experience and Contemporary American Fiction

New Strangers in Paradise

New Strangers in Paradise offers the first in-depth account of the ways in which contemporary American fiction has been shaped by the successive generations of immigrants to reach U.S. shores. Gilbert Muller reveals how the intersections of peoples, regions, and competing cultural histories have remade the American cultural landscape in the aftermath of World War II. Muller focuses on the literature of Holocaust survivors, Chicanos, Latinos, African Caribbeans, and Asian Americans. In the quest for a new identity, each of these groups seeks the American dream and rewrites the story of what it means to be an American. New Strangers in Paradise explores the psychology of uprooted peoples and the relations of culture and power, addressing issues of race and ethnicity, multiculturalism and pluralism, and national and international conflicts. Examining the groups of immigrants in the cultural and historical context both of America and of the lands from which they originated, Muller argues that this "fourth wave" of immigration has led to a creative flowering in modern fiction. The book offers a fresh perspective on the writings of Vladimir Nabokov, Sual Bellow, William Styron, Maxine Hong Kingston, Amy Tan, Oscar Hijuelos, Jamaica Kincaid, Bharati Mukherjee, Rudolfo Anaya, and many others.

The Story of John Nightly

The Story of John Nightly

'I loved the creativity, the unpredictability, its dazzling coverage of so many ideas' Rob Cowan 'Superb . . . An original character and an original book' David Quantick, Record Collector Can John Nightly be brought back to life again? John Nightly (b. 1948) finds his dimension in pop music, the art form of his time. His solo album becomes one of 1970's bestselling records – but success turns out to have side effects. Supermaxed in LA after a dazzling career, John renounces his gift, denying music and his very being, until he is rediscovered in Cornwall thirty years later by a teenage saviour dude, who persuades him to restore and complete his quasi-porto-multimedia eco-Mass, the Mink Bungalow Requiem. This epic novel mixes real and imagined lives in the tale of a young singer-songwriter, to tell a story about creativity at the highest level – the level of genius.

Strangers in Paradise

A Memoir of Provence

Strangers in Paradise

Weaving a fascinating dialogue between the Old World as represented by Provence and the New World of the postmodern American university, this memoir describes in finely wrought detail a poet and critic of literary postmodernism moving his family to France and experiencing village life. Stories of amazing adjustments to a wildly different world are etched in beautiful prose, reading like a quest novel, a precise travelogue, an intense discourse on the visionary arts, and a rediscovery--if not reinvention--of the self as this contemporary American intellectual finds enlightenment in exile.

Strangers in the Land of Paradise

Creation of an African American Community in Buffalo, New York, 1900-1940

Strangers in the Land of Paradise

Now in paperback! Strangers in the Land of Paradise The Creation of an African American Community, Buffalo, NY, 1900–1940 Lillian Serece Williams Examines the settlement of African Americans in Buffalo during the Great Migration. "A splendid contribution to the fields of African-American and American urban, social and family history.... expanding the tradition that is now well underway of refuting the pathological emphasis of the prevailing ghetto studies of the 1960s and '70s." —Joe W. Trotter Strangers in the Land of Paradise discusses the creation of an African American community as a distinct cultural entity. It describes values and institutions that Black migrants from the South brought with them, as well as those that evolved as a result of their interaction with Blacks native to the city and the city itself. Through an examination of work, family, community organizations, and political actions, Lillian Williams explores the process by which the migrants adapted to their new environment. The lives of African Americans in Buffalo from 1900 to 1940 reveal much about race, class, and gender in the development of urban communities. Black migrant workers transformed the landscape by their mere presence, but for the most part they could not rise beyond the lowest entry-level positions. For African American women, the occupational structure was even more restricted; eventually, however, both men and women increased their earning power, and that—over time—improved life for both them and their loved ones. Lillian Serece Williams is Associate Professor of History in the Women's Studies Department and Director of the Institute for Research on Women at Albany, the State University of New York. She is editor of Records of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, 1895–1992, associate editor of Black Women in United States History, and author of A Bridge to the Future: The History of Diversity in Girl Scouting. 352 pages, 14 b&w illus., 15 maps, notes, bibl., index, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 Blacks in the Diaspora—Darlene Clark Hine, John McCluskey, Jr., and David Barry Gaspar, general editors