Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 1)

Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 1)

Essays which state the fundamentals of Jung's psychological system: "On the Psychology of the Unconscious" and "The Relations Between the Ego and the Unconscious," with their original versions in an appendix.

The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

The concept of 'Archteypes' and the hypothesis of 'A Collective Unconscious' are two of Jung's better known and most exciting ideas. In this volume - taken from the Collected Works and appearing in paperback for the first time - Jung describes and elaborates the two concepts. Three essays establish the theoretical basis which are then followed by essays on specific archetypes. The relation of these to the process of individuation is examined in the last section. The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious is one of Jung's central works. There are many illustrations in full colour.

Four Archetypes

Four Archetypes

The concept of the archetype is crucial to Jung's radical interpretation of the human mind. Jung believed that every person partakes of a universal or collective unconscious that persists through generations. The origins of the concept can be traced to his very first publication in 1902 and it remained central to his thought throughout his life. As well as explaining the theoretical background behind the idea, in Four Archetypes Jung describes the four archetypes that he considers fundamental to the psychological make-up of every individual: mother, rebirth, spirit and trickster. Exploring their role in myth, fairytale and scripture, Jung engages the reader in discoveries that challenge and enlighten the ways we perceive ourselves and others.

Four Archetypes

(From Vol. 9, Part 1 of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung) [New in Paper]

Four Archetypes

Reprint. Originally published: 1959; 1st Princeton/Bollingen pbk. ed. published: 1970.

Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 2)

Aion Researches Into the Phenomenology of the Self

Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 9 (Part 2)

Aion, originally published in German in 1951, is one of the major works of Jung's later years. The central theme of the volume is the symbolic representation of the psychic totality through the concept of the Self, whose traditional historical equivalent is the figure of Christ. Jung demonstrates his thesis by an investigation of the Allegoria Christi, especially the fish symbol, but also of Gnostic and alchemical symbolism, which he treats as phenomena of cultural assimilation. The first four chapters, on the ego, the shadow, and the anima and animus, provide a valuable summation of these key concepts in Jung's system of psychology.

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Transpersonal Psychology

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Transpersonal Psychology

The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Transpersonal Psychology presents the most inclusive resource yet published on this topic - which seeks to benefit humanity by integrating ancient wisdom and modern knowledge. Features the work of more than fifty leading voices in the field, creating the most comprehensive survey of transpersonal psychology yet published Includes emerging and established perspectives Charts the breadth and diversity of the transpersonal landscape Covers topics including shamanism, neurobiology, holotropic states, transpersonal experiences, and more