The Bone People

Author: Keri Hulme
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807130728
Size: 65.92 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2485
Download
Integrating both Maori myth and New Zealand reality, The Bone People became the most successful novel in New Zealand publishing history when it appeared in 1984. Set on the South Island beaches of New Zealand, a harsh environment, the novel chronicles the complicated relationships between three emotional outcasts of mixed European and Maori heritage. Kerewin Holmes is a painter and a loner, convinced that "to care for anything is to invite disaster." Her isolation is disrupted one day when a six-year-old mute boy, Simon, breaks into her house. The sole survivor of a mysterious shipwreck, Simon has been adopted by a widower Maori factory worker, Joe Gillayley, who is both tender and horribly brutal toward the boy. Through shifting points of view, the novel reveals each character's thoughts and feelings as they struggle with the desire to connect and the fear of attachment. Compared to the works of James Joyce in its use of indigenous language and portrayal of consciousness, The Bone People captures the soul of New Zealand. After twenty years, it continues to astonish and enrich readers around the world.

The Bone People

Author: Keri Hulme
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 9780143116455
Size: 52.56 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7748
Download
Set in the harsh environment of the South Island beaches of New Zealand, this masterful story brings together three singular people in a trinity that reflects their country's varied heritage. Winner of the 1985 Booker-McConnell prize for fiction.

Why C K Stead Didn T Like Keri Hulme S The Bone People

Author: Margery Fee
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 33.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 701
Download
C.K. Stead contented that Keri Hulme should not have been awarded the Pegasus Award for Maori Literature because ..."The bone people.. is a novel by a Pakeha which has won an award intended for a Maori." This article examines the two controversial questions that C.K. Stead's comments raise. ""First, how do we determine minority group membership? Second, can majority group members speak as minority members, Whites as people of colour, men as women, intellectuals as working people?"--P.[11].

Te Kaihau

Author: Keri Hulme
Publisher: Victoria University Press
ISBN: 9780864730190
Size: 70.67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 813
Download

Strands

Author: Keri Hulme
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN:
Size: 16.77 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 516
Download
This second collection of poems by the Booker Prize-winning author of The Bone People is made up of three parts. The first poem, "Fishing the Olearia Tree," is a rich and moving exploration of natural processes. "Against Small Evil Voices" is a collection of chants, stories, and memories full of Maori elements and focused primarily on the strength of the family and the courage of women. Finally, "Winesongs" is a selection of more casual lyrics, attractive in expression and effortless in execution. Hulme's verse is loose, sometimes including passages of prose, but is shaped by a powerful romantic drive and a sophisticated attention to the behavior of language.

Imagination And The Creative Impulse In The New Literatures In English

Author: Maria Teresa Bindella
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9789051833102
Size: 80.23 MB
Format: PDF
View: 403
Download
Imagination and the Creative Impulse in the New Literatures in English brings together the proceedings of a symposium organised by the editors at the University of Trento in 1990. At a time when the study of the post-colonial literatures is gaining more widespread recognition, scholars based mainly at universities in Italy and Germany were invited to address the manner in which writers are giving literary expression to the complexity of contemporary post-colonial and multicultural societies and to consider, from their differing perspectives on the new literatures, central questions of formal experimentation, linguistic innovation, social and political commitment, textual theory and cross-culturality. Focusing on such major writers such as Achebe, Soyinka and Walcott, as well as on lesser-known figures such as Jack Davis, Witi Ihimaera, Rohinton Mistry and Manohar Malgonkar, the contributors take up many themes characteristic of the new literatures: the challenge posed to traditional authority, the expression of national identity, the role of literature in the liberation struggle, modes of literary practice in multicultural societies; the relationship of the new literatures in English to that of the former metropolitan centre; and the complex intertextuality characterizing much of the literary production of post-colonial societies.

The Circle The Spiral

Author: Eva Rask Knudsen
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9789042010581
Size: 35.99 MB
Format: PDF
View: 411
Download
In Aboriginal and Maori literature, the circle and the spiral are the symbolic metaphors for a never-ending journey of discovery and rediscovery. The journey itself, with its indigenous perspectives and sense of orientation, is the most significant act of cultural recuperation. The present study outlines the fields of indigenous writing in Australia and New Zealand in the crucial period between the mid-1980s and the early 1990s – particularly eventful years in which postcolonial theory attempted to 'centre the margins' and indigenous writers were keen to escape the particular centering offered in search of other positions more in tune with their creative sensibilities. Indigenous writing relinquished its narrative preference for social realism in favour of traversing old territory in new spiritual ways; roots converted into routes.Standard postcolonial readings of indigenous texts often overwrite the 'difference' they seek to locate because critical orthodoxy predetermines what 'difference' can be. Critical evaluations still tend to eclipse the ontological grounds of Aboriginal and Maori traditions and specific ways of moving through and behaving in cultural landscapes and social contexts. Hence the corrective applied in Circles and Spirals – to look for locally and culturally specific tracks and traces that lead in other directions than those catalogued by postcolonial convention.This agenda is pursued by means of searching enquiries into the historical, anthropological, political and cultural determinants of the present state of Aboriginal and Maori writing (principally fiction). Independent yet interrelated exemplary analyses of works by Keri Hulme and Patricia Grace and Mudrooroo and Sam Watson (Australia) provided the 'thick description' that illuminates the author's central theses, with comparative side-glances at Witi Ihimaera, Heretaunga Pat Baker and Alan Duff (New Zealand) and Archie Weller and Sally Morgan (Australia).

Indigenous Literature Of Oceania

Author: Nicholas J. Goetzfridt
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313291739
Size: 60.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5086
Download
Contains bibliographic data and short summaries of texts that comment on fiction, poetry, and plays written by Pacific Islanders.