The Buddha and the Borderline

My Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder through Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Buddhism, and

The Buddha and the Borderline

Kiera Van Gelder's first suicide attempt at the age of twelve marked the onset of her struggles with drug addiction, depression, post-traumatic stress, self-harm, and chaotic romantic relationships-all of which eventually led to doctors' belated diagnosis of borderline personality disorder twenty years later. The Buddha and the Borderline is a window into this mysterious and debilitating condition, an unblinking portrayal of one woman's fight against the emotional devastation of borderline personality disorder. This haunting, intimate memoir chronicles both the devastating period that led to Kiera's eventual diagnosis and her inspirational recovery through therapy, Buddhist spirituality, and a few online dates gone wrong. Kiera's story sheds light on the private struggle to transform suffering into compassion for herself and others, and is essential reading for all seeking to understand what it truly means to recover and reclaim the desire to live.

Borderline Personality Disorder

New Reasons for Hope

Borderline Personality Disorder

With proper treatment, people with borderline personality disorder can enjoy long remissions and improved quality of life.

Borderline Personality Disorder Primer

Borderline Personality Disorder Primer

Over the past decade, there has been a burgeoning of interest in understanding and treating borderline personality disorder, a disorder characterized by extreme emotional reactivity, impulsivity and serious interpersonal difficulties resulting in frequent loss of relationships. Individualswith borderline personality disorder comprise a substantial proportion of the psychiatric outpatient population, are often seen in emergency rooms and have major functional impairment (e.g. unemployment). Suicide occurs in 3-9% of the population. Furthermore, non-suicidal self injury (e.g. cuttingwithout the intent to die), eating disorders and substance abuse are frequently seen in the context of borderline personality disorder. Not only do the individuals with the disorder suffer, their family members also experience distress and can feel burdened and overwhelmed. Once thought to be nonexistent or a "grab bag" diagnosis, borderline personality disorder is now understood as a significant emotional disorder with its own neurobiological and psychosocial correlates. At the same time, the disorder is still poorly understood and stigmatized with limited resourcesavailable to the novice clinician and mental health professional trainees (e.g. psychiatry residents, psychology doctoral students, social work students). The aim of this primer on borderline personality disorder is to fill this void and provide an accessible, easy-to-use, clinically-oriented, evidenced-based guide for early stage clinicians. We present the most up to data about borderline personality disorder by leading experts in the field in aformat accessible to trainees and professionals working with individuals with borderline personality disorder and their family members. The volume is comprehensive and covers the etiology of BPD, its clinical presentation and co-morbid disorders, genetics and neurobiology of BPD, effective treatmentof BPD, the role of advocacy and special subpopulations (e.g.forensic)in the clinical management of BPD.