The City and the Pillar

The City and the Pillar

Jim Willard, former high-school athlete and clean-cut boy-next-door-, is haunted by the memory of a romanctic adolescent encounter with his friend Bob Ford. As Jim pursues his first love, in awe of the very same masculinity he possesses himself, his progresss through the secret gay world of 1940's America unveils surreptitious Hollywood affairs, the hidden life of the military in the Second World War and the underworld bar culture of New York City. With the publication of his daring thrid novel The City and the Pillar in 1948, Gore Vidal shocked the American public, which has just begun to hail him as their newest and brightest young writer. It remains not only an authentic and profoundly importatnt social document but also a serious exploration of the nature of idealistic love.

The City and the Pillar and Seven Early Stories

Revised, with a New Preface by the Author

The City and the Pillar and Seven Early Stories

The author's early novel about homosexual life and the immersion of a regular American man in the gay subculture of New York and California is accompanied by seven early stories written during the 1950s

Conversations with Gore Vidal

Conversations with Gore Vidal

In this collection of interviews with Gore Vidal, one of America's most prolific authors, the writer, screenwriter, and raconteur proves himself to be a witty, acerbic, and cantankerous conversationalist who defies conventional wisdom and lacerates cliches inherent in politics and literature. Simultaneous.

Weekend

A Comedy in Two Acts

Weekend

THE STORY: Says the New York Post: ... [WEEKEND] tells of a Republican Senator who is about to announce his candidacy for his party's nomination for the Presidency when his son returns from a long stay in Europe bringing with him a Negro girl who is

The Queer Sixties

The Queer Sixties

The Queer Sixties assembles an impressive group of cultural critics to go against the grain of 1960s studies, and proposes new and different ways of the last decade before the closet doors swung open. Imbued with the zeitgeist of the 60s, this playful and powerful collection rescues the persistence of the queer imaginary.

Duluth

Duluth

A satiric look at the state of the union centers on a relocated Duluth and its assorted politicians, policemen and women, terrestrial and extraterrestrial aliens, Hispanics, feminists, mobsters, and other minorities

Homosexuality in Cold War America

Resistance and the Crisis of Masculinity

Homosexuality in Cold War America

Challenging widely held assumptions about postwar gay male culture and politics, this book examines how gay men in the 1950s resisted pressures to remain in the closet.

The Last Empire

Essays 1992-2000

The Last Empire

Like his National Book Award—winning United States, Gore Vidal’s scintillating ninth collection, The Last Empire, affirms his reputation as our most provocative critic and observer of the modern American scene. In the essays collected here, Vidal brings his keen intellect, experience, and razor-edged wit to bear on an astonishing range of subjects. From his celebrated profiles of Clare Boothe Luce and Charles Lindbergh and his controversial essay about the Bill of Rights–which sparked an extended correspondence with convicted Oklahoma City Bomber Timothy McVeigh–to his provocative analyses of literary icons such as John Updike and Mark Twain and his trenchant observations about terrorism, civil liberties, the CIA, Al Gore, Tony Blair, and the Clintons, Vidal weaves a rich tapestry of personal anecdote, critical insight, and historical detail. Written between the first presidential campaign of Bill Clinton and the electoral crisis of 2000, The Last Empire is a sweeping coda to the last century’s conflicted vision of the American dream.

Sexplosion

From Andy Warhol to A Clockwork Orange-- How a Generation of Pop Rebels Broke All the Taboos

Sexplosion

After the sexual revolution came the sexual explosion The six years between 1968 and 1973 saw more sexual taboos challenged than ever before. Film, literature, and theater simultaneously broke through barriers previously unimagined, giving birth to what we still consider to be the height of sexual expression in our pop culture: Portnoy's Complaint, Myra Breckinridge, Hair, The Boys in the Band, Midnight Cowboy, Last Tango in Paris, and Deep Throat. In Sexplosion, Robert Hofler weaves a lively narrative linking many of the writers, producers, and actors responsible for creating these and other controversial works, placing them within their cultural and social frameworks. During the time the Stonewall Riots were shaking Greenwich Village and Roe v. Wade was making its way to the Supreme Court, a group of daring artists was challenging the status quo and defining the country's concept of sexual liberation. Hofler follows the creation of and reaction to these groundbreaking works, tracing their connections and influences upon one another and the rest of entertainment. Always colorful and often unexpected, Sexplosion is an illuminating account of a generation of sexual provocateurs and the power their works continue to hold decades later.