The Colors Of Us

Author: Karen Katz
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805071634
Size: 77.41 MB
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Seven-year-old Lena and her mother observe the variations in the color of their friends' skin, viewed in terms of foods and things found in nature. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

All The Colors Of Life

Author: Shirley J. Wenrich
Publisher: BalboaPress
ISBN: 1452564183
Size: 78.97 MB
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There have been many qualities obtained over the years, including work and positions of leadership in several nonprofit organizations. Also a deep interest in color and design, ranging from the ownership in two art shops that bridged the gap between art gallery and a craft shop, with quality and variety. This led to set design for a local theater and interior design that I love. However, the greatest achievement, besides raising four children, was my participation in the Harmonic Convergence. This took place in 1987, and the best place to be was the only sacred site east of the Mississippi at the Serpent Mounds in Ohio. Since I needed an active part, I was The Hug Lady and met people from all over the world. Whatever we did, it helped, because the Berlin Wall came down within three years, and it was the beginning of the end of Communism. I enjoy anything I can do to help others.

The Color Of Wealth

Author: Barbara Robles
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595585621
Size: 80.49 MB
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For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.

The Colors Of His Love

Author: Dee Brestin
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
ISBN: 1418539546
Size: 50.99 MB
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Following the success of the highly acclaimed Falling in Love with Jesus, Dee Brestin and Kathy Troccoli give women the encouragement needed to become radiant women of Christ. The Colors of His Love will help women go deeper with Jesus by applying the secrets from John's first letter, learning to clothe themselves in Christ's love. Instead of being a washed-out beige, living mediocre lives, they can become radiant with the colors of love. Using art as a literary theme throughout the book, facets of God's love are paralleled with colors, giving women vivid pictures of how the imprint of God's love can change their lives. This art theme will be carried out visually in classic masterpieces that illustrate biblical stories of God's transforming love such as Esther, Doubting Thomas, and the Good Samaritan. Includes such chapters as: Embroidered with Gold It's Not Easy Being Green True Blue Red is the Color of the Blood that Flowed Down

The Color Of Water

Author: James McBride
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781440636103
Size: 54.48 MB
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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Good Lord Bird, winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction, Five-Carat Soul, and Kill 'Em and Leave, a James Brown biography. The incredible modern classic that Oprah.com calls one of the best memoirs of a generation and launched James McBride’s literary career. Over two years on The New York Times bestseller list Who is Ruth McBride Jordan? A self-declared "light-skinned" woman evasive about her ethnicity, yet steadfast in her love for her twelve black children. James McBride, journalist, musician, and son, explores his mother's past, as well as his own upbringing and heritage, in a poignant and powerful debut, The Color Of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother. The son of a black minister and a woman who would not admit she was white, James McBride grew up in "orchestrated chaos" with his eleven siblings in the poor, all-black projects of Red Hook, Brooklyn. "Mommy," a fiercely protective woman with "dark eyes full of pep and fire," herded her brood to Manhattan's free cultural events, sent them off on buses to the best (and mainly Jewish) schools, demanded good grades, and commanded respect. As a young man, McBride saw his mother as a source of embarrassment, worry, and confusion—and reached thirty before he began to discover the truth about her early life and long-buried pain. In The Color of Water, McBride retraces his mother's footsteps and, through her searing and spirited voice, recreates her remarkable story. The daughter of a failed itinerant Orthodox rabbi, she was born Rachel Shilsky (actually Ruchel Dwara Zylska) in Poland on April 1, 1921. Fleeing pogroms, her family emigrated to America and ultimately settled in Suffolk, Virginia, a small town where anti-Semitism and racial tensions ran high. With candor and immediacy, Ruth describes her parents' loveless marriage; her fragile, handicapped mother; her cruel, sexually-abusive father; and the rest of the family and life she abandoned. At seventeen, after fleeing Virginia and settling in New York City, Ruth married a black minister and founded the all- black New Brown Memorial Baptist Church in her Red Hook living room. "God is the color of water," Ruth McBride taught her children, firmly convinced that life's blessings and life's values transcend race. Twice widowed, and continually confronting overwhelming adversity and racism, Ruth's determination, drive and discipline saw her dozen children through college—and most through graduate school. At age 65, she herself received a degree in social work from Temple University. Interspersed throughout his mother's compelling narrative, McBride shares candid recollections of his own experiences as a mixed-race child of poverty, his flirtations with drugs and violence, and his eventual self- realization and professional success. The Color of Water touches readers of all colors as a vivid portrait of growing up, a haunting meditation on race and identity, and a lyrical valentine to a mother from her son.

The Color Of Empire

Author: Michael L. Krenn
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1597974730
Size: 72.57 MB
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At first glance, it may be difficult to accept that race and racism play a major role, whether conscious or subconscious, in policymaking. But leaders are products of their upbringing and era, and even some of America's best-educated presidents and secretaries of state have been slave owners, segregationists, or bigots. Some belong to America's distant past, but it was not so long ago that the civil rights movement began to correct America's troubled race relations. While race has rarely served as the primary motivating factor in America's foreign policies, Michael Krenn shows that it has functioned as both a powerful justification for U.S. actions abroad and a significant influence on their shape, direction, and intensity. Portraying nonwhite races as inferior allowed U.S. policymakers to rationalize territorial expansion at the expense of Native Americans and Mexico, to demonize the enemy in wars fought against Filipino insurgents and Japanese soldiers, and to justify intervention in developing nations. Racism made America's leaders soft on European colonialism, and U.S. racial segregation laws were an obstacle to winning hearts and minds in the developing world during the Cold War. Race plays a more subtle role in U.S. foreign relations today, but speeches about turning the war on terror into a crusade, the abuse of detainees in military prisons, and apathy toward genocide in Darfur can be explained, in part, by prejudice. The Color of Empire challenges readers to recognize that American perceptions and prejudices about race have influenced the conduct of U.S. foreign relations from the colonial era to the present. This concise survey is an excellent introduction to the topic for both students and general readers.

The Colors Of Jews

Author: Melanie Kaye/Kantrowitz
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253219272
Size: 78.90 MB
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Exposes and challenges the common assumptions about what defines Jewishness

Under The Color Of Law

Author: Martin Henn
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 073914331X
Size: 62.88 MB
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Under the Color of Law constitutes a full and critical scholarly commentary to the text of five key Bush administration legal memoranda formative of U.S. counterterrorism policy from 2001 to 2009. This volume is dedicated to the idea that these documents are worthy of being read and critically examined in themselves as primary text, precisely because the act of critical assessment may yield meaningful policy reform in the ongoing debate facing the nation over balancing security interests with the preservation of civil liberties. This volume is intended to provide counterpoint for, and antithesis to, positions vigorously defended by President Bush's attorneys working at the OLC inside the Department of Justice, and it is designed to be used primarily in conjunction with and examined as response to the Bush-era documents themselves. Martin Henn investigates five central questions, each framed around commentary to a specific administration document. This work addresses the Yoo-Flanigan Memorandum of September 25, 2001, and asks whether any President has constitutional power to initiate a foreign war without congressional authorization. Regarding President Bush's November 13 executive order of 2001, Henn asks whether an emergency of war permits any President to usurp judicial and legislative powers to interpret law and define and punish offences against the law of nations. Along with many other questions these documents initiate, the author carefully analyzes and seeks to answer questions regarding the Bush administration, the use of interrogational coercion and torture in the war on terror.