The Coming of the Fairies

The Coming of the Fairies

This book contains reproductions of the famous Cottingley photographs, and gives the whole of the evidence in connection with them. The diligent reader is in almost as good a position as I am to form a judgment upon the authenticity of the pictures. This narrative is not a special plea for that authenticity, but is simply a collection of facts the inferences from which may be accepted or rejected as the reader may think fit. I would warn the critic, however, not to be led away by the sophistry that because some professional trickster, apt at the game of deception, can produce a somewhat similar effect, therefore the originals were produced in the same way. There are few realities which cannot be imitated, and the ancient argument that because conjurers on their own prepared plates or stages can produce certain results, therefore similar results obtained by untrained people under natural conditions are also false, is surely discounted by the intelligent public. I would add that this whole subject of the objective existence of a subhuman form of life has nothing to do with the larger and far more vital question of spiritualism. I should be sorry if my arguments in favour of the latter should be in any way weakened by my exposition of this very strange episode, which has really no bearing upon the continued existence of the individual.

The Coming of the Fairies

The Coming of the Fairies

Best remembered for his creation of Sherlock Holmes, the world's first consulting detective and a dedicated adherent to logic, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in later life became fascinated by the occult. In this peculiar 1921 nonfiction work, Conan Doyle mounts a defense of the infamous "Cottingley Fairies," supposed photographic evidence produced by two Yorkshire girls in 1917. Though the photographers admitted in the 1980s that they had faked the fairies, at the time their "evidence" was embraced by a public fascinated by spiritualism... and stoked by such proponents as Conan Doyle. Though later considered an embarrassing misstep on the author's part, this artifact of the writer's bibliography remains an intriguing read, and essential for anyone looking to understand the fad for the occult in the early decades of the 20th century. Scottish surgeon and political activist SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE (1859-1930) turned his passions into stories and novels, producing fiction and nonfiction works sometimes controversial (The Great Boer War, 1900), sometimes fanciful (The Lost World, 1912), and sometimes legendary (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, 1892).

The Sign of Four

The Sign of Four

First published in 1890, The Sign of Four is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's second book starring legendary detective Sherlock Holmes. The story is complex, involving a secret between four ex-cons from India and a hidden treasure. More complex than the first Holmes novel, The Sign of Four also introduces the detective's drug habit and leaves breadcrumbs for the reader that lead toward the final resolution. Readers are offered an explanation of the mystery from the killer's perspective, encouraging a sense of sympathy with the condemned that the previous book also lacked. Any fan of the mystery genre should consider this book a must-read. Scottish surgeon and political activist SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE (1859-1930) turned his passions into stories and novels, producing fiction and nonfiction works sometimes controversial (The Great Boer War, 1900), sometimes fanciful (The Coming of the Fairies, 1922), and sometimes legendary (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, 1892).

The Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena

The Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena

From sacred mountains and places of pilgrimage to visions and out-of-body travel, this reference explores unusual and unexplained physical events, apparitions, and other phenomena rooted in religious beliefs. Each entry features a balanced presentation and includes a description of the phenomenon, the religious claims surrounding the occurrence, and a scientific response. Touring the world and history, this comprehensive reference includes entries on angels, comets, Marian apparitions, and religious figures such as Jesus, Mohammad, and Lao Tzu.

The Real World of Fairies

A First-Person Account

The Real World of Fairies

The Real World of Fairies is a privileged glimpse into a joyous, animated universe. Dora's enchanting vision of her encounters with the fairy realm delights the child in us, while it excites our grown-up imagination, rekindles our creative energy, and deepens our sense of connection with nature. This new edition features a foreword by Celtic folk expert Caitlin Matthews. Caitlin's personal experiences and deep knowledge of the fairy world resonate brilliantly with Dora's, adding a fresh perspective for contemporary readers.

Shakespiritualism

Shakespeare and the Occult, 1850–1950

Shakespiritualism

This study concerns itself with a now-forgotten religious group, Spiritualists, and how their ensuing discussions of Shakespeare's meaning, his writing practices, his possible collaborations, and the supposed purity and/or corruption of his texts anticipated, accompanied, or silhouetted similar debates in Shakespeare Studies.

The Hound of the Baskervilles

Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes, with "The Adventure of the Speckled Band"

The Hound of the Baskervilles

The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–02) is Arthur Conan Doyle’s most celebrated Sherlock Holmes adventure. At the end of the yew tree path of his ancestral home, Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead. Close by are the footprints of a gigantic hound. Called to investigate, Holmes seems to face a supernatural foe. In the tense narration of the detective’s efforts to solve the crime, Conan Doyle meditates on late Victorian and early twentieth-century ideas of ancestry and atavism, the possible biological determination of criminals, the stability of the British landed classes, and the place of the supernatural. Historical documents included with this fully-annotated Broadview edition help contextualize the novel’s debates and reveal its cultural and literary significance as a supreme instance of early detective fiction. Also included is the Conan Doyle short story “The Adventure of the Speckled Band.”

The Edge of the Unknown

The Edge of the Unknown

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of the famous Sherlock Holmes, was also a believer in ghosts and fairies and wrote books about spiritualism and fairies. This is the most famous of them.

Angels A to Z

Angels A to Z

Written by two recognized authorities on nontraditional religious movements, this resource is one of the most comprehensive books on angels and related topics currently available. More than 300 entries are included and drawn from multiple religions, such as Christianity, Islam, and Hindu traditions, as well as from pop culture. A variety of angel topics are discussed, including celebrity angels, classifications of angels, obscure angels still waiting for their big break, guardian angels, fallen angels, Anaheim angels, biblical figures associated with angels, angels in art and architecture, and angels in the media and literature. Angels are also discussed in terms of the occult and metaphysics, with entries on UFOs, fairies, and witches. A comprehensive resource section lists movies, books, magazines, and organizations related to angels.