The Complete Novels of George Orwell

Animal Farm, Burmese Days, A Clergyman's Daughter, Coming Up for Air, Keep the Aspidistra Flying, Nineteen Eighty-Four

The Complete Novels of George Orwell

Contains the complete novels of George Orwell: Animal Farm, Burmese Days, A Clergyman's Daughter, Coming up for Air, Keep the Aspidistra Flying and Nineteen Eighty-Four. Includes explanatory notes on the etymology of the language 'Newspeak'.

The Penguin Complete Novels of George Orwell

The Penguin Complete Novels of George Orwell

Contains the complete novels of George Orwell - "Animal Farm", "Burmese Days", "A Clergyman's Daughter", "Coming up for Air", "Keep the Aspidistra Flying" and "Nineteen Eighty-Four"

The Unsung Artistry of George Orwell

The Novels from Burmese Days to Nineteen Eighty-Four

The Unsung Artistry of George Orwell

In a timely and radically new reappraisal of George Orwell's fiction, Loraine Saunders reads Orwell's novels as tales of successful emancipation rather than as chronicles of failure. Contending that Orwell's novels have been undervalued as works of art, she offers extensive textual analysis to reveal an author who is in far more control of his prose than has been appreciated. Persuasively demonstrating that Orwell's novels of the 1930s such as A Clergyman's Daughter and Keep the Aspidistra Flying are no less important as literature than Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four, Saunders argues they have been victims of a critical tradition whose practitioners have misunderstood Orwell's narrative style, failed to appreciate Orwell's political stance, and were predisposed to find little merit in Orwell's novels. Saunders devotes significant attention to George Gissing's influence on Orwell, particularly with regard to his representations of women. She also examines Orwell's socialism in the context of the political climate of the 1930s, finding that Orwell, in his successful negotiation of the fine balance between art and propaganda, had much more in common with Charlie Chaplin than with writers like Stephen Spender or W. H. Auden. As a result of Saunders's detailed and accessible analysis, which illuminates how Orwell harmonized allegory with documentary, polyphonic voice with monophonic, and elegy with comedy, Orwell's contributions to the genre of political fiction are finally recognized.

Animal Farm and 1984

Animal Farm and 1984

This edition features George Orwell's best known novels – 1984 and Animal Farm – with an introduction by Christopher Hitchens. In 1984, London is a grim city where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind. Winston Smith joins a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party. Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be. Animal Farm is Orwell's classic satire of the Russian Revolution -- an account of the bold struggle, initiated by the animals, that transforms Mr. Jones's Manor Farm into Animal Farm--a wholly democratic society built on the credo that All Animals Are Created Equal. But are they?

The Pocket Guide to Classic Books

The Pocket Guide to Classic Books

Everything you need to know about classic literature in one handy guide by lecturer Maureen Hughes. Covering everything from the authors to the plays themselves and their common themes, accessibility is a key selling point with factboxes highlighting key or curious facts about the subject. Its size makes it the perfect stocking filler for the Christmas market or at anytime of the year for those wanting more information about what theyre reading or studying in a handy, pocket-sized guide.

Student Companion to George Orwell

Student Companion to George Orwell

Analyzes each of Orwell's major writings in chronological order, looking at the literary components of each as well as the historical content that informed each work, and offers alternate interpretations.

The Orwell Reader

Fiction, Essays, and Reportage

The Orwell Reader

Selections reveal the development of Orwell's personality and thinking during the thirties and forties

Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984)

Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984)

War is Peace. Freedom is Slavery. Ignorance is Strength. Winston Smith rewrites history for the Ministry of Truth, but when he’s handed a note that says simply ‘I love you’ by a woman he hardly knows, he decides to risk everything in a search for the real truth. In a world where cheap entertainment keeps the proles ignorant but content, where a war without end is always fought and the government is always watching, can Winston possibly hold onto what he feels inside? Or will he renounce everything, accept the Party’s reality and learn to love Big Brother? ‘Dunster – both in his faithful take on the story and in his sometimes extreme but always enthralling adaptation – gets close to the heart of Orwell’s warning, pointing up but not overemphasising its current political resonances.... Newspeak, Doublethink, Room 101 and Thought Police take on a chilling reality in this compelling production.’ – The Independent

George Orwell

A Humanistic Perspective

George Orwell

This Appreciation Of Orwell S Novels Has Basically Been Intended To Place The Novelist In The Humanistic Perspective. The Humanistic Urges Make Inroads Into The Human Psyche Which Show Up His Assertion Of Faith In The Human Endeavour. The Humanistic Urges Which Emanate From His Literary And Fictional Art, Enable Man To Make A Better Living On The Planet Earth Is The Basic Thrust Which The Book Projects Him As A Novelist Of Humanitarian Concern. Orwell S Portrayal Of Life, In All Its Varied Piquant Colours And Perspectives, Helps To Unroll His Perspicacity Of Incessant Love For The Downtrodden, The Plebeian And Above All For The Suffering Humanity. The Book Systematically Studies The Growth And Evolution Of Humanistic Movements Which Enabled Orwell To Envisage That Revolutions Brought About In Terms Of The Socialistic And The Capitalistic Machinations Merely Annihilate Human Aspirations. It Is An Attempt To Emphasize Orwell S Anguish And Disillusionment Which He Faced During The Thirties. It Reveals His Aversion To The Sinister Pacific Designs Of Society. It Is A Depiction Of Orwell S Incessant Search For Man S Retrieval From The Pacifistic Cloister Of Totalitarian And Dictatorial Domains. The Book Lucidly Elevates Orwell As A Committed Writer, Committed To His Love For The Mankind And His Humanitarian Concern For A Meaningful Existence On The Planet Earth.George Orwell Is Ranked Along With The British Writers Like D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster And Graham Greene. What Is Striking Is That It Is A Systematic And Analytical Study Of Orwell S Novels, Essays, Letters, Travelogues And His Other Writings From The Humanistic Perspective. The Book Projects George Orwell Not Only As A Political Satirist Or A Polemicist But Also As A Complete Novelist And Connoisseur Of Varied Nuances Of Literature With His Firm Assertion In Man S Dignity And Human Potentialities (Nineteen Eighty Four; Animal Farm). His Other Novels Like Burmese Days, A Clergyman S Daughter, Coming Up For Air Are An Extended Metaphor Of His Deep And Profound Humanitarian Vision. Orwell S Novels Make For Rays Into The Humanistic Urges And Make Assertion Of Faith In The Inherent Potentialities Of Human Life For A Better Living On The Planet.Infact, The Book Intends To Expose Modern Pretence And Hypocrisy And Thus Brings Into Focus Orwell S Relentless Literary And Fictional Efforts Inculcated Against All Forms Of Evil Showing His Aversion To Both The Socialistic And Capitalistic Patterns Of Society. It Deals With The Realistic Exposition Of The Totalitarian And Dictatorial Powers Which Remain Hidden Inside The Whale. As George Orwell Felt The Smoldering Anguish Of The Thirties, His Concern For A Way Out To The Crisis Social, Moral, Political Even Existential Has Been Shared By Other Novelists Like Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh, Aldous Huxley, C.P. Snow, Meyers, Rexwarner, John Wain, William Golding And Kingsley Amis.Relevance Of Orwell S Exploration Of The Exquisite Humanistic Urges And His Incessant Humanitarian Concern Is A Transcendental Reality Which Goes On To Remain Undiminished Even With The Turn Of The New Century And The Golden Millennium.

Filming Literature

The Art of Screen Adaptation

Filming Literature

This is a comprehensive survey of the relationship between film and literature. It looks at the cinematic adaptations of such literary masters as Shakespeare, Henry James, Joseph Conrad and D.H. Lawrence, and considers the contribution to the cinema made by important literary figures as Harold Pinter, James Agree and Graham Greene. Elsewhere, the book draws intriguing analogies between certain literary and film artists, such as Dickens and Chaplin, Ford and Twain, and suggests that such analogies can throw fresh light on the subjects under review. Another chapter considers the film genre of the bio-pic, the numerous cinematic attempts to render in concrete terms the complexities of the literary life, whether the writer be Proust, Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Dashiel Hammett, Agatha Christie or Boris Pasternak. Originally published in 1986, this is a book to appeal to any reader with an interest in film or literature, and is of especial value to those involved in the teaching or study of either subject.