The Deadliest Diseases in History - Biology for Kids | Children's Biology Books

The Deadliest Diseases in History - Biology for Kids | Children's Biology Books

Did you know that some of the common diseases today were once very deadly because of the lack of proper knowledge against them? Take a step back in time and review some of the deadliest diseases in history. How many people died of these diseases? What leaps have scientists taken to protect mankind from viruses and bacteria? Know the answers to these questions and more. Read this book today!

Germ Smart! Infectious Diseases for Kids | Children's Biology Books

Germ Smart! Infectious Diseases for Kids | Children's Biology Books

Get smart about germs to escape them at all possibilities. This book will outline some of the most common infectious diseases known to man. Being equipped with the knowledge included in this book will help improve your child’s understanding of body processes and defenses. Are you ready for some serious discussion on diseases? Then secure a copy today!

The Ongoing Columbian Exchange: Stories of Biological and Economic Transfer in World History

Stories of Biological and Economic Transfer in World History

The Ongoing Columbian Exchange: Stories of Biological and Economic Transfer in World History

This unique encyclopedia enables students to understand the myriad ways that the Columbian Exchange shaped the modern world, covering every major living organism from pathogens and plants to insects and mammals. • Represents the only encyclopedia to comprehensively treat the Columbian Exchange and document how this watershed event in history changed the world, not just in North America but worldwide • Provides full accounts of demographic and epidemiological trends and how the planet's current biodiversity resulted from the events of the Columbian Exchange • Includes primary documents that offer students material for analysis and promote critical thinking skills, thus supporting Common Core State Standards • Supplies both entry bibliographies and a selected, general bibliography to direct students to sources of additional information

Medical Primatology

History, Biological Foundations and Applications

Medical Primatology

Due to the high degree of biological similarity between primates and humans, monkeys and apes have been used successfully in medical research for many decades. Medical Primatology: History, Biological Foundations and Applications provides a comprehensive summary linking the use of monkeys and apes in biomedical research to their kinship with humans. The book begins by discussing the history of this research, and then focuses on the biological foundations upon which medical primatology has been built. Primate taxonomy and evolution are reviewed, using not only traditional sources of data, but also recent experimental evidence from molecular biology, genetics, and biomedicine that indicates the need to place higher simians in the family of man. Condensing a broad range of scientific literature into one volume, this will be a useful reference for specialists in the biological sciences and medicine, as well as researchers involved in biological, anthropological, biomedical, clinical, and pharmacological research on primates.

In the Year After Mom Died

August 20, 2006 to August 20, 2007

In the Year After Mom Died

The author deals with grief and reflects on life and change following the death of his mother in 2006. Her treasure old house and the unintended influence of Arthur Miller are followed through this book.

Mary Lincoln

Southern Girl, Northern Woman

Mary Lincoln

One of America’s most compelling First Ladies, Mary Lincoln possessed a unique vantage point on the events of her time, even as her experiences of the constraints of gender roles and the upheaval of the Civil War reflected those of many other women. The story of her life presents a microcosm through which we can understand the complex and dramatic events of the nineteenth century in the United States, including vital issues of gender, war, and the divisions between North and South. The daughter of a southern, slave-holding family, Mary Lincoln had close ties to people on both sides of the war. Her life shows how the North and South were interconnected, even as the country was riven by sectional strife. In this concise narrative, Stacy Pratt McDermott presents an evenhanded account of this complex, intelligent woman and her times. Supported by primary documents and a robust companion website, this biography introduces students to the world of nineteenth-century America, and the firsthand experiences of Americans during the Civil War.

Public Health and Infectious Diseases

Public Health and Infectious Diseases

Emerging infectious diseases may be defined as diseases being caused by pathogens only recently recognized to exist. This group of diseases is important globally, and the experience of the last 30 years suggests that new emerging diseases are likely to bedevil us. As the global climate changes, so changes the environment, which can support not only the pathogens, but also their vectors of transmission. This expands the exposure and effects of infectious disease and, therefore, the importance of widespread understanding of the relationship between public health and infectious disease. This work brings together chapters that explain reasons for the emergence of these infectious diseases. These include the ecological context of human interactions with other humans, with animals that may host human pathogens, and with a changing agricultural and industrial environment, increasing resistance to antimicrobials, the ubiquity of global travel, and international commerce. * Features the latest discoveries related to influenza with a newly published article by Davidson Hamer and Jean van Seventer * Provides a listing of rare diseases that have become resurgent or spread their geographic distribution and are re-emergent * Highlights dengue and malaria, as well as agents such as West Nile and other arboviruses that have spread to new continents causing widespread concerns * Includes discussions of climate influencing the spread of infectious disease and political and societal aspects

Toxin

The cunning of bacterial poisons

Toxin

What do the following have in common: the promise of Botox as the key to everlasting youthful looks; E. coli O157 hamburger disease; a mysterious illness which killed 35 heroin users in 2000; and the assassination by poisoned umbrella-tip of a Bulgarian dissident in the 1970s? The answer is that all of these are caused by toxins, the powerful biological poisons released by bacteria and some plants. In Toxin, Alistair Lax reveals the panoply of ways in which bacterial toxins overcome the defences of our cells. He explains how they work, how they are so successful in causing major diseases, the terrible human impact they have had, and how apparently 'new' diseases arise from them. He also discusses how we can combat toxins, and how we can harness their actions for beneficial purposes. Enlivened by the very human story of the persistence, rivalries, and insights from which modern microbiology grew, Toxin is the first widely accessible account of this exciting and important topic.