The United States and Mexico

Face to Face With New Technology

The United States and Mexico

Rapid technological advance is fast changing the nature of the relationship between the industrial countries and the advanced developing countries. This volume explores the meanings of this change close to home-as it affects the U.S.-Mexican relationship. What is the impact of the new technology on trade, investment, and labor flows between the United States and Mexico? Will development of a stronger Mexican industrial sector constitute an aid or a threat to specific U.S. industries? While demand for the middle-technology goods that countries such as Mexico can produce is growing in the United States, the debt crisis and the high dollar make procuring the high-technology capital goods necessary for this effort difficult and expensive. An overview essay explores the impact of technological change upon conflicts between the economic and political objectives of the two countries and ways in which the coordination of national politics might be maximized. The authors--representing a mix of government and business experience in both countries--offer specific recommendations on improving the efficiency of bilateral economic interaction, reducing the adjustment costs of technological change, and avoiding diplomatic tensions between the nations. Policy analysts examine the bilateral implications of the development strategies pursued by Mexico and the United States, the role played by domestic interest groups in the formation of these strategies, and the impact of technological change in the labor force along the border. Industry specialists examine changes in the automotive industry, the electric and electronics industries, bio-technological change in agriculture and nutrition, and the pharmaceutical and pharmochemical industries. Cathryn L. Thorup is the director of the Overseas Development Council's U.S.-Mexico Project, a policy-oriented, Washington-based forum for the exchange of ideas among key actors in the bilateral relationship. She is the author of many articles on conflict management in the U.S. Mexican policies toward Central America. Between 1980 and 1982, Ms. Thorup wrote regularly on international politics for the Mexican news magazine, Ranoes.

The Computational Beauty of Nature

Computer Explorations of Fractals, Chaos, Complex Systems, and Adaptation

The Computational Beauty of Nature

Gary William Flake develops in depth the simple idea that recurrent rules can produce rich and complicated behaviors.

God's Transformations for Our Lives

God's Use of 40 to Transform Our Lives: Study and Devotional

God's Transformations for Our Lives

I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Jeremiah 29:11 Do you find yourself asking Why? Why are individuals experiencing uncertain circumstances? Why do bad things happen to good people? Why cant I figure out my purpose in life? Why, why, why? Trials and tribulations have always been a part of life here on earth. Even Jesus wasnt immune. Its part of our journey, our experience. Struggles and hardships challenge us to stop and ask God for help and guidance. Through these times, we grow in our faith when we trust God is with us and enabling us to persevere and overcome. Join the author as she shares her study and devotionals during her own personal walk through a transformational period. Through study of four transformational examples in the Bible, she walks us through her daily devotions and reveals her personal journal entries for those devotions, guiding you through a forty-day study and devotional. Learn how God uses the number 40 to represent a time of major change and transformation in life. In every instance, God is the rock and salvation, our strength and endurance, which allows us to put one foot in front of the other to wade through uncertain circumstances while His Son, Jesus Christ, embraces and guides us.

Approaches to Natural Language

Proceedings of the 1970 Stanford Workshop on Grammar and Semantics

Approaches to Natural Language

The papers and comments published in the present volume represent the proceedings of a research workshop on the grammar and semantics of natural languages held at Stanford University in the fall of 1970. The workshop met first for three days in September and then for a period of two days in November for extended discussion and analysis. The workshop was sponsored by the Committee on Basic Research in Education, which has been funded by the United States Office of Education through a grant to the National Academy of Education and the National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council. We acknowledge with pleasure the sponsorship which made possible a series oflively and stimulating meetings that were both enjoyable and instructive for the three of us, and, we hope, for most of the participants, including a number of local linguists and philosophers who did not contribute papers but actively joined in the discussion. One of the central participants in the workshop was Richard Montague. We record our sense of loss at his tragic death early in 1971, and we dedicate this volume to his memory. None of the papers in the present volume discusses explicitly problems of education. In our view such a discussion is neither necessary nor sufficient for a contribution to basic research in education. There are in fact good reasons why the kind of work reported in the present volume constitutes an important aspect of basic research in education.

Truth, Testimony, and Transformation

A New Reading of the “I Am” Sayings of Jesus in the Fourth Gospel

Truth, Testimony, and Transformation

Investigating various contexts of the I am sayings in Jewish and Hellenistic traditions, including the immediate context of the Johannine community, Kim seeks to explore the themes and structure of the I am sayings of Jesus in the Fourth Gospel. In doing so, Kim demonstrates how the I am sayings of Jesus can be understood as Jesus' embodiment of God's presence--the Logos of God in the world--and how such a language can help transform the struggling community into a loving community for all through a new vision of the Logos.

Capital Markets and Corporate Governance in Japan, Germany and the United States

Organizational Response to Market Inefficiencies

Capital Markets and Corporate Governance in Japan, Germany and the United States

Why did financial keiretsu develop in Japan, but not in Germany and the United States? Why is bank intermediation more dominant in Germany and Japan than in the United States? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each system? Capital Markets and Corporate Governance in Japan, Germany and the United States answers these and related questions. Helmut Dietl explains capital market intermediation, holding companies, multidivisional organizations, financial keiretsu, and LBO associations as organizational responses to capital market inefficiencies. Country-specific responses are described as a consequence of country-specific financial regulations. Each regulatory regime results in specific capital market inefficiencies. Comparative capital market and corporate data highlight the major strengths and weaknesses of each system. This book provides a comprehensive and innovative analysis of German, Japanese and U.S. regulations.

Nigeria Since Independence

Forever Fragile?

Nigeria Since Independence

This book analyses the political and ethnical tensions that characterize Nigeria, which derive both from colonial and contemporary conflicts. It points out three major factors why Nigeria has not yet collapsed like many other African states: ethnic power sharing amongst the political elite, the military with its national outlook, and oil wealth.