The Furthest Station

The Furthest Station

There's something going bump on the Metropolitan line and Sergeant Jaget Kumar knows exactly who to call. It's PC Peter Grant's speciality . . . Only it's more than going 'bump'. Traumatised travellers have been reporting strange encounters on their morning commute, with strangely dressed people trying to deliver an urgent message. Stranger still, despite calling the police themselves, within a few minutes the commuters have already forgotten the encounter - making the follow up interviews rather difficult. So with a little help from Abigail and Toby the ghost hunting dog, Peter and Jaget are heading out on a ghost hunting expedition. Because finding the ghost and deciphering their urgent message might just be a matter of life and death.

Cambridge Station

Its Development and Operation as a Rail Centre

Cambridge Station

Why build a Railway to Cambridge? This is the first substantive illustrated book about Cambridge Station which explores the opening of the station in 1845; the four principal railway companies which all worked to and from the station in a tangle of mutual inconvenience; the extensive goods traffic which was handled in the several goods yard around the station; and the way the Station operated from early beginnings, to what Abellio East Anglia and Network Rail offer today. Cambridge Station is renowned for having one of the longest single platforms in the UK, served by Up and Down trains. Ingenious trackwork and extensive signalling could satisfy passengers who were told at the central booking hall entrance: 'Turn left for Kings Lynn or right for London.' The book contains several pictures never before published, showing how the Eastern Counties and then the Great Eastern Railway Companies contrived Cambridge Station and the Engine Sheds, Goods Yards, Signal Boxes and extensive sidings to serve East Anglia. And it tells people stories too, because the author worked on the station in the 1950s and 1960s and knows Cambridge and East Anglia well. He is a geographer and writes with knowledge, wisdom and humour.

Multiwavelength Optical LANs

Multiwavelength Optical LANs

During the last thirty years or so it has been widely recognised in the research community that the key transmission medium seeming capable of serving both the ever-growing demand for bandwidth and the unceasing need for new services, is optical fibre. In this context, Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) is the most popular technique for introducing concurrency among multiple user transmissions into the network and, thus, exploiting the huge amount of fibre bandwidth available under the severe limitations imposed by electronics speed on the maximum network access rate. This book extensively covers an important research area in optical networking, enabling readers to fully understand the concepts of optical LANs and learn details of architecture issues and control protocols. Through its careful focus on the local area, the book, covers the major architectural, topological and protocol issues regarding optical Local Area Networks (LANs) today. Considering that constant advances on optical component technology make all-optical WDM LANs all the more feasible for a wide commercial deployment, the book investigates thoroughly the crucial latter topic, i.e. the Media-Access Control (MAC) protocols that should be used. Besides introducing a noteworthy part of the vast literature on such protocols and providing some helpful distinguishing key protocol characteristics, the book is also innovative in focusing on a recent significant class of promising protocols whose operation is based on network feedback information. In this way, these adaptive protocols for optical LANs achieve an overall higher performance in comparison with many other non-adaptive schemes. Multiwavelength Optical LANs: Enables readers to understand the concepts of optical LANs and learn details of architecture issues and control protocols Focuses on the major architectural, topological and protocol issues regarding optical local area networks Presents the important class of adaptive protocols for optical LANs No Optical systems/network developers, or engineers and scientists working in optical networking should be without this book. The well considered approach also makes this recommended reading for undergraduate and graduate computer science, computer, electrical and telecommunications engineering students.

Directory of Northridge Earthquake Research

Directory of Northridge Earthquake Research

This invitation conference, held Dec. 2 and 3, 1994, included earth scientists, engineers, social scientists, agency program managers, and practitioners and others who implement earthquake research. Chapters include: NSF-funded Northridge Earthquake researchers; summary of USGS Northridge supplementary funding; NIST Northridge research; FEMA Northridge research; organizational research programs: Calif. Div. of Mines and Geology, Calif. Seismic Safety Comm., EERI, NCEER, NHRAIC, Rand Critical Technologies Inst., and SAC Joint Venture; Info. Services: EERC-NISEE, NCEER Info. Services, and OES DFO; and individuals' research projects.

Lewis's Fifth Floor

A Department Story

Lewis's Fifth Floor

The legendary Lewis's store in Liverpool is a landmark that retains the affections of the city. Once a famed emporium of glamour and spectacle which drew crowds from miles around and became the subject of urban myths, the store was part of a retail phenomenon that changed the way we shop and the architectural landscape of our cities: a world in miniature, where shoppers could buy everything under one roof and the staff included up to four generations of families. This book contains remarkable photographs taken on the 'lost' fifth floor of Lewis's by photographer Stephen King. They capture the remarkable history and former glory.

The River of Golden Sand

The Narrative of a Journey Through China and Eastern Tibet to Burmah

The River of Golden Sand

An 1880 report describing an expedition from Chengdu, China along the eastern edge of Tibet to Bhamo in northern Burma.