The Job

True Tales from the Life of a New York City Cop

The Job

“HOW YA DOIN’?” With these four syllables, delivered in an unmistakably authentic New York accent, Steve Osborne has riveted thousands of people at the legendary storytelling venue The Moth (and many tens of thousands more via YouTube) with his hilarious, profane, and touching tales from his twenty years as an NYPD street cop. Steve Osborne is the real deal, people: the tough, streetwise New York cop of your dreams, one with a big, big heart. Kojak? NYPD Blue? Law & Order? Fuggedaboudem! The Job blows them out of the water. Steve Osborne has seen a thing or two in his years in the NYPD—some harmless, some definitely not. In “Stakeout,” Steve and his partner mistake a Manhattan dentist for an armed robbery suspect, and reduce the man to a puddle of snot and tears when questioning him. In “Mug Shot,” the mother of a suspected criminal makes a strange request and provides a sobering reminder of the humanity at stake in his profession. And in “Home,” the image of Steve’s family provides the adrenaline he needs to fight for his life when assaulted by two armed and violent crackheads. From stories about his days as a rookie cop to the time spent patrolling in the Anti-Crime Unit—and his visceral, harrowing recollections of working during the weeks after 9/11—The Job: True Tales from the Life of a New York City Cop captures the humanity, the absurdity, and the dark humor of police work, as well as the bravery of those who do it. These stories will speak to those nostalgic for the New York City of the 1980s and ’90s, a bygone era when the city was a crazier, more dangerous (and possibly more interesting) place. From the Hardcover edition.

Communication Accommodation Theory

Negotiating Personal Relationships and Social Identities across Contexts

Communication Accommodation Theory

Most people modify their ways of speaking, writing, texting, and e-mailing, and so on, according to the people with whom they are communicating. This fascinating book asks why we 'accommodate' to others in this way, and explores the various social consequences arising from it. Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT), revised and elaborated over the past 40 years, has been applied to a wide range of situations, from families to courtrooms, and from media to hospitals, by means of diverse methodologies in many disciplines, and across numerous languages and cultures. Bringing together a team of experts, this book demonstrates how the theory can help us towards a greater understanding of interpersonal communication in a multitude of contexts. Finally, it examines the principles of the theory, identifying a range of avenues along which research can move forward in future.

Notorious New Jersey

100 True Tales of Murders and Mobsters, Scandals and Scoundrels

Notorious New Jersey

Notorious New Jersey is the definitive guide to murder, mayhem, the mob, and corruption in the Garden State. With tabloid punch, Jon Blackwell tells riveting accounts of Alexander Hamilton falling mortally wounded on the dueling grounds of Weehawken; Dutch Schultz getting pumped full of lead in the men’s room of the Palace Chop House in Newark; and a gang of Islamic terrorists in Jersey City mixing the witch’s brew of explosives that became the first bomb to rock the World Trade Center. Along with these dramatic stories are tales of lesser-known oddities, such as the nineteenth-century murderer whose skin was turned into leather souvenirs, and the state senator from Jersey City who faked his death in a scuba accident in the 1970s in an effort to avoid prison. Blackwell also sheds light on some historical whodunits—was Bruno Hauptmann really guilty of kidnapping the Lindbergh baby? Who was behind the anthrax attacks of 2001? Not forgotten either are notorious characters who may actually be innocent, including Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, and those who have never been convicted of wrongdoing although they left office in scandal, including Robert Torricelli and James McGreevey. Through 100 historic true-crime tales that span over 300 years of history, Blackwell shows readers a side of New Jersey that would make even the Sopranos shudder.

The Funniest Cop Stories Ever

The Funniest Cop Stories Ever

Nothing quite prepares you for what you will see on the street once you become a cop. It is one of the most dangerous jobs a person can do but also the most fun as well. --Scott Baker Cops are the people who see and hear it all. They work at one of the world's most dangerous jobs, but it's also one of the most entertaining. When their lives are at risk-and even when they aren't--cops encounter constant weirdness and stupidity in human behavior. The Funniest Cop Stories Ever collects the strangest, most amusing stories about stupid crooks, bungled crimes, and station-house banter. A true look at what life is like behind the badge, the tales in The Funniest Cop Stories Ever were collected by real-life ex-New York City policeman Scott Baker and coauthor Tom Philbin. Anecdotes are told by the real-life cops who experienced them and include: * A foot chase after a dwarf who karate-kicked his girlfriend's door and assaulted her while wearing a tuxedo and carrying a violin case. * A beggar who ended people's pay phone calls so he could demand their extra spare change. * A narcotics bust on a guy who claimed the crack cocaine--and his pants--didn't belong to him.

Through the Eyes of a Lawman

The Cultural Tales of a Cop, Lawyer, and Intelligence Analyst

Through the Eyes of a Lawman

Sociologists and historians can examine and dissect our culture, but only a true eyewitness can offer the details on the ground. In Through the Eyes of a Lawman, author Michael J. Butler presents an insiders look at the people and organizations that have affected the US intelligence services; the modern way law and law enforcement operates and has evolved; the educational deficiencies of the system; and our collective loss of abstract and critical thinking. Through humorous and sober anecdotes, Through the Eyes of a Lawman addresses the issue of whether we have become a make-it-up-as-we-go-along society. Butlers story begins in the 1950s in Brooklyn, New York, and is told through his perspective as a retired cop, lawyer, former US intelligence analyst, and college instructor. Against the backdrop of his extensive law enforcement experience, Butler paints a portrait of todays society and culture, examines how it has been evolving, and explores what it means for the countrys future. Through the Eyes of a Lawman goes behind the curtain that separates the people from the law, police, the courts, the intelligence services, and the government to analyze the ideas of heroes, villains, cops, terrorism, trials, classrooms, judges, soldiers, Vietnam, and politics.

The Crime Fighter

Putting the Bad Guys Out of Business

The Crime Fighter

Former NYPD Deputy Commissioner Jack Maple was a man in a bow tie and homburg--he was also on a mission to revolutionize the way crime is fought: how cops go after crooks, and how they prevent crime in the first place. And he succeeded. But Maple is not satisfied. In The Crime Fighter, he shows how crime can be attacked all across America. Laced with fascinating, incredible, and often very funny tales of Maple's adventures as a cop, the book is as entertaining as it is informative. Anyone interested in how criminals think and act, and how the police should do their jobs, will devour this absorbing book. From the Trade Paperback edition.