The Language Of Medicine

Author: Davi-Ellen Chabner
Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
ISBN: 1455728462
Size: 34.42 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 1265
Download
Study medical terms in the car, at the gym, or anywhere you go with iTerms, the quick, flexible way to master medical terminology. Pronunciations and definitions for more than 3,000 terms help you confidently master medical language. 22 chapter quizzes provide an efficient study tool for auditory learners.

Medicine And The Saints

Author: Ellen J. Amster
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292745443
Size: 11.42 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 972
Download
The colonial encounter between France and Morocco in the late nineteenth century took place not only in the political realm but also in the realm of medicine. Because the body politic and the physical body are intimately linked, French efforts to colonize Morocco took place in and through the body. Starting from this original premise, Medicine and the Saints traces a history of colonial embodiment in Morocco through a series of medical encounters between the Islamic sultanate of Morocco and the Republic of France from 1877 to 1956. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources in both French and Arabic, Ellen Amster investigates the positivist ambitions of French colonial doctors, sociologists, philologists, and historians; the social history of the encounters and transformations occasioned by French medical interventions; and the ways in which Moroccan nationalists ultimately appropriated a French model of modernity to invent the independent nation-state. Each chapter of the book addresses a different problem in the history of medicine: international espionage and a doctor's murder; disease and revolt in Moroccan cities; a battle for authority between doctors and Muslim midwives; and the search for national identity in the welfare state. This research reveals how Moroccans ingested and digested French science and used it to create a nationalist movement and Islamist politics, and to understand disease and health. In the colonial encounter, the Muslim body became a seat of subjectivity, the place from which individuals contested and redefined the political.

The Hermeneutics Of Medicine And The Phenomenology Of Health

Author: F. Svenaeus
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401594589
Size: 47.63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1821
Download
Fredrik Svenaeus' book is a delight to read. Not only does he exhibit keen understanding of a wide range of topics and figures in both medicine and philosophy, but he manages to bring them together in an innovative manner that convincingly demonstrates how deeply these two significant fields can be and, in the end, must be mutually enlightening. Medicine, Svenaeus suggests, reveals deep but rarely explicit themes whose proper comprehension invites a careful phenomenological and hermeneutical explication. Certain philosophical approaches, on the other hand - specifically, Heidegger's phenomenology and Gadamer's hermeneutics - are shown to have a hitherto unrealized potential for making sense of those themes long buried within Western medicine. Richard M. Zaner, Ann Geddes Stahlman Professor of Medical Ethics, Vanderbilt University

Bulletin Of The History Of Medicine

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 76.15 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 1189
Download
Includes the Transactions of the 15th- annual meetings of the American Association of the History of Medicine, 1939-

The Work Of France

Author: James R. Farr
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 0742557189
Size: 36.68 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1276
Download
This clearly written and deeply informed book explores the nature and meaning of work in early modern France. Distinguished historian James R. Farr considers the relationship between material life—specifically the work activities of both men and women—and the culture in which these activities were embedded. This culture, he argues, helped shape the nature of work, invested it with meaning, and fashioned the identities of people across the social spectrum. Farr vividly traces the daily lives of peasants, common laborers, domestic servants, prostitutes, street vendors, craftsmen and -women, merchants, men of the law, medical practitioners, and government officials. Work was recognized and valued as a means to earn a living, but it held a greater significance as a cultural marker of honor, identity, and status. Constants and continuities in work activities and their cultural aspects shared space with changes that were so profound and sweeping that France would be forever transformed. The author focuses on three salient, interconnected, and at times conflicting developments: the extension and integration of the market economy, the growth of the state's functions and governing apparatus, and the intensification of social hierarchy. Presenting a unified and compelling argument about the role of labor in society, Farr addresses a complex set of questions and succeeds masterfully at answering them. With its stylish writing and clear themes, this book will find a broad audience among students and scholars of early modern Europe, French history, economics, gender studies, anthropology, and labor studies.