The Last Explorer

Hubert Wilkins, Australia's Unknown Hero

The Last Explorer

‘A superb book – every Australian should read it.’ - Dick Smith The gripping story of one of the greatest explorers of the 20th Century. Hubert Wilkins was truly the last - and one of the greatest - explorers. And much more than that. Born in South Australia, he spent much of his life outside the country - but always remained an Australian. He travelled through every continent and was a pioneer of aviation. He survived crashes and disasters, firing squads and sabotage, living long enough to be honoured by kings, presidents and dictators. He was a frontline photographer in World War I - and was twice decorated. He took the first ever film of battle and took the first moving images from an aircraft. He was the first man to fly across the Arctic Ocean, the first to fly in the Antarctic - and the first to fly from America to Europe across the then unknown Arctic (the New York Times called this 'the greatest flight in history'). In the 1930s he spent several years travelling in western Queensland and the Northern Territory - where many of his observations and views were ahead of their time. In the later years of his life he did work for the US military and intelligence - and in 1958 was buried at sea at the North Pole by the US Navy.

The Versatile Image

Photography, Digital Technologies and the Internet

The Versatile Image

New insights into the shifting cultures of today’s ‘hypervisual’ digital universe With the advent of digital technologies and the Internet, photography can, at last, fulfill its promise and forgotten potential as both a versatile medium and an adaptable creative practice. This multidisciplinary volume provides new insights into the shifting cultures affecting the production, collection, usage, and circulation of photographic images on interactive World Wide Web platforms.

Australia's First Naturalists

Indigenous Peoples' Contribution to early Zoology

Australia's First Naturalists

Would Blaxland, Wentworth and Lawson have ever crossed the Blue Mountains without the help of the local Aboriginal people? The invaluable role of local guides in this event is rarely recognised. As silent partners, Aboriginal Australians gave Europeans their first views of iconic animals, such as the Koala and Superb Lyrebird, and helped to unravel the mystery of the egg-laying mammals: the Echidna and Platypus. Well into the twentieth century, Indigenous people were routinely engaged by collectors, illustrators and others with an interest in Australia's animals. Yet this participation, if admitted at all, was generally barely acknowledged. However, when documented, it was clearly significant. Penny Olsen and Lynette Russell have gathered together Aboriginal peoples' contributions to demonstrate the crucial role they played in early Australian zoology. The writings of the early European naturalists clearly describe the valuable knowledge of the Indigenous people of the habits of Australia's bizarre (to a European) fauna. 'Australia's First Naturalists' is invaluable for those wanting to learn more about our original inhabitants' contribution to the collection, recognition and classification of Australia's unique fauna. It heightens our appreciation of the previously unrecognised complex knowledge of Indigenous societies.

Flight to Fame

Victory in the 1919 Great Air Race, England to Australia

Flight to Fame

Flight to Fame, a classic adventure story, tells the hair-raising tale of the world-first flight from England to Australia, in the words of the pilot, (Sir) Ross Smith. In March 1919, Australia's prime minister announced a prize of £10,000 for the first successful flight from Great Britain to Australia in under 30 days. Late that same year, the victorious pilots, Ross and Keith Smith, landed in Darwin to international acclaim. The New York Times gushed: 'Captain Ross Smith has done a wonderful thing for the prestige of the British Empire. He must be hailed as the foremost living aviator.' Their achievement was the forerunner to the age of international air travel. During the race, Ross and his brother Keith (his co-pilot and navigator) wrote in their diaries daily, recording the journey of their four-man crew in their Vickers Vimy G-EAOU twin-engine plane, its open cockpit exposing them to snow, sleet, hail and unbearable heat. Originally published as 14,000 Miles Through the Air (1922), Ross Smith's book recounts their danger-ridden, record-breaking journey - a mere 16 years after the Wright brothers first defied gravity for just a few seconds. This richly illustrated edition, published to coincide with the flight's centenary, is introduced and edited by historian Peter Monteath.

Australia and the Antarctic Treaty System: 50 years of influence

Australia and the Antarctic Treaty System: 50 years of influence

The Antarctic Treaty, which is at the heart of the regime that covers the vast region of sea and land surrounding the South Pole, has been in force for 50 years. Australia and the Antarctic Treaty System examines Australia's crucial contribution, past and present, within the system of cooperative governance established by the Antarctic Treaty. The Antarctic Treaty System has been a notably successful international collaboration that has fostered scientific discovery, environmental protection and - most of all - peace, while enabling national interest and endeavour. Australia claims 42% of the.

Antarctica

A Biography

Antarctica

For centuries it was suspected that there must be an undiscovered continent in the southern hemisphere. But explorers failed to find one. On his second voyage to the Pacific, Captain Cook sailed further south than any of his rivals but still failed to sight land. It was not until 1820 that the continent's frozen coast was finally sighted. Territorial rivalry intensified in the 1840s when British, American, and French expeditions sailed south to chart further portions of the continent that had come to be called Antarctica. For the nearly two centuries since, the race to claim exclusive possession of Antarctica has gripped the imagination of the world. Antarctica: A Biography is the first ever major international history of this forbidding continent - from the eighteenth century voyages of discovery to the fierce rivalries of today, as governments, scientists, environmentalists, and oil companies compete for control. On one level it is the story of explorers battling the elements in the most hostile place on earth as they strive for personal triumph, commercial gain, and national glory. On a deeper level, it is the story of nations seeking to incorporate the Antarctic into their own national stories - and to claim its frozen wastes as their own.

Sabotage in the Arctic

Fate of the Submarine Nautilus

Sabotage in the Arctic

The story of Australian-born Sir Hubert Wilkins and the Nautilus is usually a brief footnote, if mentioned at all, of Arctic exploration history. However, it is a tale of daring enterprise and of men captivated by the pursuit of noble deeds. Having leased and extensively modified a decommissioned vintage World War I U.S. Navy submarine, the Wilkins-Ellsworth Trans Arctic Submarine Expedition of 1931 was marked by controversy from its inception. Many considered it a huge publicity stunt, especially the planned rendezvous at the North Pole with the German airship Graf Zeppelin. The Nautilus did make it into the Arctic but suspected sabotage ended Sir Huberts quest to be the first to use a submarine to cross the Arctic Ocean by way of the North Pole. An oceanographer, historian and author, Dr. Nelson is a Fellow of the Marine Technology Society, a member of the Explorers Club and the former president of the American Oceanic Organization.

Griffith Taylor

Visionary, Environmentalist, Explorer

Griffith Taylor

Thomas Griffith Taylor (1880-1963) was a geographer, anthropologist, and world explorer. His travels took him from Captain Scott's final expedition in Antarctica to every continent on earth, in a professional life that stretched from the Boer War to the Cold War. Taylor's research ranged from microscopic analysis of fossils to the "races of man," the geographic basis of global politics, while his work as a professor led him from his Cambridge education to the Universities of Chicago and Sydney, as well as Harold A. Innis' recently-founded geography department in the University of Toronto. As a scientific secularist, Taylor made it his lifelong mission to enlighten the public on humankind's relation to the environment and was an early environmentalist. His progressive views on interracial marriage, as well as his criticisms of social Darwinist doctrines, anti-Semitism, and twentieth-century nationalism caused him to be constantly embroiled in controversy. Often dismissed by his contemporary political and intellectual opponents, many subsequent scientists and thinkers have come to regard his life as prophetic. This timely, beautifully produced, and copiously illustrated biography recounts and analyses the fascinating life of a remarkably contemporary man.

Stefansson, Dr. Anderson and the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-1918

A Story of Exploration, Science and Sovereignty

Stefansson, Dr. Anderson and the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-1918

"This book presents the first comprehensive account of one of the great sagas of Arctic exploration and discovery, the Canadian Arctic Expedition of 1913-1918, led by the ethnologist/explorer Vilhjalmur Stafansson and the zoologist Dr. Rudolph M. Anderson. Within its pages are details of the expedition's successes and tragedies, including the discovery of all but one large island north of the Canadian mainland, the accumulation of considerable scientic information and valuable collections, and the personal feud of the Expedition's two leaders." -- from publisher.