The Last Jews In Berlin

Author: Leonard Gross
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497689384
Size: 53.83 MB
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New York Times Bestseller: The true story of twelve Jews who went underground in Nazi Berlin—and survived: “Consummately suspenseful” (Los Angeles Times). When Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933, approximately one hundred sixty thousand Jews called Berlin home. By 1943 less than five thousand remained in the nation’s capital, the epicenter of Nazism, and by the end of the war, that number had dwindled to one thousand. All the others had died in air raids, starved to death, committed suicide, or been shipped off to the death camps. In this captivating and harrowing book, Leonard Gross details the real-life stories of a dozen Jewish men and women who spent the final twenty-seven months of World War II underground, hiding in plain sight, defying both the Gestapo and, even worse, Jewish “catchers” ready to report them to the Nazis in order to avoid the gas chambers themselves. A teenage orphan, a black-market jewel trader, a stylish young designer, and a progressive intellectual were among the few who managed to survive. Through their own resourcefulness, bravery, and at times, sheer luck, these Jews managed to evade the tragic fates of so many others. Gross has woven these true stories of perseverance into a heartbreaking, suspenseful, and moving account with the narrative force of a thriller. Compiled from extensive interviews, The Last Jews in Berlin reveals these individuals’ astounding determination, against all odds, to live each day knowing it could be their last.

An Underground Life

Author: Gad Beck
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299165048
Size: 56.86 MB
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That a Jew living in Nazi Berlin survived the Holocaust at all is surprising. That he was a homosexual and a teenage leader in the resistance and yet survived is amazing. But that he endured the ongoing horror with an open heart, with love and without vitriol, and has written about it so beautifully is truly miraculous. This is Gad Beck's story.

Holocaust

Author: Peter Longerich
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192804367
Size: 33.32 MB
Format: PDF
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Argues that anti-Semitism was not a consequence of Nazi political mobilization but rather, from 1933 onwards, a central principle of the Nazi movement's attempts to implement, disseminate, and secure National Socialist rule.

The Jewish Study Bible

Author: Adele Berlin
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195297512
Size: 37.78 MB
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This study Bible offers readers of the Hebrew Bible a resource that is specifically tailored to meet their needs. It presents the centre of gravity of the Scriptures where Jews experience it.

How Jews Became Germans

Author: Deborah Sadie Hertz
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300110944
Size: 30.38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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When the Nazis came to power and created a racial state in the 1930s, an urgent priority was to identify Jews who had converted to Christianity over the preceding centuries. With the help of church officials, a vast system of conversion and intermarriage records was created in Berlin, the country’s premier Jewish city. Deborah Hertz’s discovery of these records, the Judenkartei, was the first step on a long research journey that has led to this compelling book. Hertz begins the book in 1645, when the records begin, and traces generations of German Jewish families for the next two centuries. The book analyzes the statistics and explores letters, diaries, and other materials to understand in a far more nuanced way than ever before why Jews did or did not convert to Protestantism. Focusing on the stories of individual Jews in Berlin, particularly the charismatic salon woman Rahel Levin Varnhagen and her husband, Karl, a writer and diplomat, Hertz humanizes the stories, sets them in the context of Berlin’s evolving society, and connects them to the broad sweep of European history.

The Oxford Dictionary Of The Jewish Religion

Author: Maxine Grossman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199730040
Size: 69.32 MB
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"The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion has been the go-to resource for students, scholars, and researchers in Judaic Studies since its 1997 publication. Now, The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion, Second Edition focuses on recent and changing rituals in the Jewish community that have come to the fore since the 1997 publication of the first edition, including the growing trend of baby-naming ceremonies and the founding of gay/lesbian synagogues. Under the editorship of Adele Berlin, nearly 200 internationally renowned scholars have created a new edition that incorporates updated bibliographies, biographies of 20th-century individuals who have shaped the recent thought and history of Judaism, and an index with alternate spellings of Hebrew terms. Entries from the previous edition have been be revised, new entries commissioned, and cross-references added, all to increase ease of navigation research." -- Provided by publisher.

Final Sale In Berlin

Author: Christoph Kreutzmuller
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782388125
Size: 68.86 MB
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Before the Nazis took power, Jewish businesspeople in Berlin thrived alongside their non-Jewish neighbors. But Nazi racism changed that, gradually destroying Jewish businesses before murdering the Jews themselves. Reconstructing the fate of more than 8,000 companies, this book offers the first comprehensive analysis of Jewish economic activity and its obliteration. Rather than just examining the steps taken by the persecutors, it also tells the stories of Jewish strategies in countering the effects of persecution. In doing so, this book exposes a fascinating paradox where Berlin, serving as the administrative heart of the Third Reich, was also the site of a dense network for Jewish self-help and assertion.

Slow Fire

Author: Susan Neiman
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 1610270304
Size: 31.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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BERLIN--East and West, day and night--in the 80s before the Wall fell. Through the eyes of a U.S. philosophy student. And Jewish, which makes for moments awkward, poignant, crass, funny, and always lurking. A city was divided, America the occupier, and the cigarettes not named Salem because it sounds too Jewish. The debut memoirs from the author of Moral Clarity, a N.Y. Times "2008 Notable Book."

Berlin For Jews

Author: Leonard Barkan
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022601066X
Size: 50.88 MB
Format: PDF
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Princeton scholar Leonard Barkan writes about his unabashed love of Berlin, despite its tortured history as the place where Hitler and his cadre plotted the extermination of the Jews, including members of Barkan s own family. But this is not another Holocaust book: Barkan wants to explore what a very Jewish city Berlin has been through the ages and how steeped in modern Jewish culture this vital urban marvel continues to be. Part travelogue and part history, it s a beautiful tribute to a complex city."