The New Thought Police

Inside the Left's Assault on Free Speech and Free Minds

The New Thought Police

Stop the Left from Policing Your Mind Our freedom to speak our minds is under attack. Like the Thought Police of George Orwell's 1984, powerful special interest groups on the Left are mounting a withering assault on our rights in the name of "social equality." Liberty has been turned on its ear as the rights of the few restrict the freedom of everyone. In The New Thought Police, author Tammy Bruce, a self-described lesbian feminist activist, cuts through the deluge of politically correct speech and thought codes to expose the dangerous rise of Left-wing McCarthyism. Provocative and persuasive, this book is a clarion call to anyone interested in preserving liberty.

The Death of Right and Wrong

Exposing the Left's Assault on Our Culture and Values

The Death of Right and Wrong

If you believe children should be seduced into warped sexual behavior by the Gay Elite, if you think confessed murderers should be set free by defense attorneys who know how to wield the race card, if you feel promiscuous gay men should be empowered to spread AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, don’t read this book. But if you’ve always suspected that factions on the Left are trying to destroy the values that define our civilization, this book proves it. Through the pages of The Death of Right and Wrong, author, activist, and pundit Tammy Bruce takes you inside the chilling world of the Left—a place where morals and decency have been turned on their heads and the crisp distinction between Right and Wrong has been blurred into a mushy, gray mess. In this world, the Gay Elite exploit our children—under the guise of tolerance and education—to satisfy their sexual obsessions. In this world, the Black Elite laud convicted murderers as community heroes and award-winning “artists.” In this world, the Feminist Elite fawn over a woman who mercilessly killed all five of her children. And much more that will offend your sense of decency and threaten your basic values. Ms. Bruce smashes the facades of “Tolerance,” “Understanding,” and other Leftist slogans to reveal the ugly truth of their agenda. As a gay activist and former president of the Los Angeles chapter of the National Organization of Women, she witnessed firsthand the Left’s attempts to undermine our millennia-old code of morals and values, aided by politically biased media and academia. And if the news headlines of today are any indication, they’re winning the culture war. Unless we act now, we are doomed at the hands of special interest groups on the Left who want nothing more than to undermine our ability to judge right from wrong in order to foist their own selfish, anything-goes society on the rest of us. This book reveals what they’re doing, how they’re doing it, and what we can do to restore decency in our society. You’ll discover powerful tools in these pages to help you understand the psychology of the Left—what makes them tick and, more importantly, how to stop them from eroding our values completely. Full of controversial opinions and countless examples ripped from the headlines, The Death of Right and Wrong is a powerful, eye-opening book that you won’t want to be without.

Love and Death in Lawrence and Foucault

Love and Death in Lawrence and Foucault

Love and Death in Lawrence and Foucault is the first full-length study of Foucault and the Foucaultians not to look at them from a quasi-hagiographical perspective. The Lawrentian point of view employed here to deal with Foucault and his oeuvre is utterly unique, imaginative, and efficacious in explicating/demystifying Foucaultian theory, while at the same time promoting Barry J. Scherr’s courageous, indefatigable project of «restoring» D. H. Lawrence to his rightfully and supremely high place in the pantheon of great British literature. Rebellious and unconventional yet scholarly and mature, Love and Death in Lawrence and Foucault is the bravest and most unorthodox study of Foucault to date. It is a worthy addition to Scherr’s previous literary-cultural studies, D. H. Lawrence Today and D. H. Lawrence’s Response to Plato. A supremely lively, incisive, lucid, and profound critique, Love and Death in Lawrence and Foucault is indispensable to students and scholars of Lawrence and Foucault alike.

Arrogance

Rescuing America from the Media Elite

Arrogance

Former CBS News correspondent Goldberg cites example after example of what he identifies as distorted reporting and asserts that these examples prove the pervasiveness of a liberal bias in the mainstream media. His credibility is diminished by a breathless, scattershot approach and sketchy documentation of examples (many taken out of context); but his points seem to be that attuned citizens will find such examples everywhere they look and that honest journalists should open their eyes. He includes a section of contact information for conservative organizations and think tanks.

Caught in the Crossfire

Kids, Politics, and America's Future

Caught in the Crossfire

Caught in the Crossfire reveals how the United States has been gradually changing from a society that celebrates childhood into one that is hostile to and afraid of its own children. Today kids are often seen as a threat to our social and moral values. In schools, some behavior is criminalized, and growing numbers of kids find themselves in penal and psychiatric confinement. This breakdown is often too readily attributed to bad parenting, the crisis of the family, or the greed of capitalism. Grossberg offers a new and original understanding of the changes transforming contemporary America, and of the choices Americans face about their future. He documents the relations between economic ideologies and economic realities and explores what is going on in the "culture wars" as well as on the Internet and other new media. Caught in the Crossfire argues that all of these changes and tn struggles, including those involving the state of kids, only make sense as integral parts of a larger transformation to define America's uniqueness and to develop its own sense of modern culture. Part of the Cultural Politics and the Promise of Democracy Series.

The Lost Soul of Higher Education

Corporatization, the Assault on Academic Freedom, and the End of the American University

The Lost Soul of Higher Education

The professor and historian delivers a major critique of how political and financial attacks on the academy are undermining our system of higher education. Making a provocative foray into the public debates over higher education, acclaimed historian Ellen Schrecker argues that the American university is under attack from two fronts. On the one hand, outside pressure groups have staged massive challenges to academic freedom, beginning in the 1960s with attacks on faculty who opposed the Vietnam War, and resurfacing more recently with well-funded campaigns against Middle Eastern Studies scholars. Connecting these dots, Schrecker reveals a distinct pattern of efforts to undermine the legitimacy of any scholarly study that threatens the status quo. At the same time, Schrecker deftly chronicles the erosion of university budgets and the encroachment of private-sector influence into academic life. From the dwindling numbers of full-time faculty to the collapse of library budgets, The Lost Soul of Higher Education depicts a system increasingly beholden to corporate America and starved of the resources it needs to educate the new generation of citizens. A sharp riposte to the conservative critics of the academy by the leading historian of the McCarthy-era witch hunts, The Lost Soul of Higher Education, reveals a system in peril—and defends the vital role of higher education in our democracy.

Paul Robeson

A Biography

Paul Robeson

The remarkable life of Paul Robeson, quintessential Harlem Renaissance man: scholar, all-American, actor, activist, and firebrand Born the son of an ex-slave in New Jersey in 1898, Paul Robeson, endowed with multiple gifts, seemed destined for fame. In his youth, he was as tenacious in the classroom as he was on the football field. After graduating from Rutgers with high honors, he went on to earn a law degree at Columbia. Soon after, he began a stage and film career that made him one of the country’s most celebrated figures. But it was not to last. Robeson became increasingly vocal about defending black civil rights and criticizing Western imperialism, and his radical views ran counter to the country’s evermore conservative posture. During the McCarthy period, Robeson’s passport was lifted, he was denounced as a traitor, and his career was destroyed. Yet he refused to bow. His powerful and tragic story is emblematic of the major themes of twentieth-century history. Martin Duberman’s exhaustive biography is the result of years of research and interviews, and paints a portrait worthy of its incredible subject and his improbable story. Duberman uses primary documents to take us deep into Robeson’s life, giving Robeson the due that he so richly deserves.

From the Corner of his Eye

A breath-taking thriller of mystical suspense and terror

From the Corner of his Eye

All he wanted was to make his mother proud... Dean Koontz's From the Corner of His Eye is an unforgettable thriller of suspense, danger and the supernatural. Perfect for fans of Stephen King and Richard Laymon. 'A wonderful read. The pacing is perfect, keeping the reader in exquisite tension. This is a deeply satisfying, rich novel. You may have nightmares about [the villain] but you'll love the other characters. Singularly and collectively, they are unforgettable. From the Corner of His Eye is magic' - New Orleans Times-Picayune Bartholomew Lampion was blinded at the age of three, when surgeons reluctantly removed his eyes to save him from a fast-spreading cancer. But although eyeless, Barty regained his sight when he was thirteen. This sudden ascent from a decade of darkness into the glory of light was not brought about by a holy healer. No celestial trumpets announced the restoration of his vision, just as none had announced his birth. A rollercoaster had something to do with his recovery, as did a seagull. And you can't discount Barty's profound desire to make his mother proud of him before she died. The first time she died was the day Barty was born. January 6, 1965. What readers are saying about From the Corner of His Eye: 'At one stage I was so shocked by what happened I had to reread a few pages to make sure I hadn't misread... the twist was so surprising and so unexpected' 'This book had twists and turns to the last word' 'One of the best books I've ever read'