The Night Shift

Real Life in the Heart of the E.R.

The Night Shift

In The Night Shift, Dr. Brian Goldman shares his experiences in the witching hours at Mount Sinai Hospital in downtown Toronto. We meet the kinds of patients who walk into an E.R. after midnight: late-night revellers injured on their way home after last call, teens assaulted in the streets by other teens and a woman who punches another woman out of jealousy over a man. But Goldman also reveals the emotional, heartbreaking side of everyday E.R. visits: adult children forced to make life and death decisions about critically ill parents, victims of sexual assault, and mentally ill and homeless patients looking for understanding and a quick fix in the twenty-four-hour waiting room. Written with Goldman’s trademark honesty and with surprising humour, The Night Shift is also a frank look at many issues facing the medical profession today, and it offers a highly compelling inside view into an often shrouded world.

Just Here Trying to Save a Few Lives

Tales of Life and Death from the ER

Just Here Trying to Save a Few Lives

An emergency medicine physician for nearly a decade, Dr. Pamela Grim has delivered babies, treated heart attacks, saved car accident victims, comforted the dying, and consoled the living who were left behind. She has worked all over the world, caring for victims of gang life in America's inner cities, victims of the war in Bosnia, poverty-stricken patients in Nigeria, and bank presidents in the United States. Relating these rich and varied experiences with compelling prose, Dr. Grim takes readers into the E.R. and lets them experience first-hand what it takes to make split-second, life-and-death decisions in the course of an average day. And with unflinching honesty, she conveys what it's like to be a caring physician with one of the most demanding, exhilarating, frustrating, and rewarding jobs in the world.

Satan Absolved

Satan Absolved


The New York Times Theatre Reviews 1999-2000

The New York Times Theatre Reviews 1999-2000

This volume is a comprehensive collection of critical essays on The Taming of the Shrew, and includes extensive discussions of the play's various printed versions and its theatrical productions. Aspinall has included only those essays that offer the most influential and controversial arguments surrounding the play. The issues discussed include gender, authority, female autonomy and unruliness, courtship and marriage, language and speech, and performance and theatricality.

Julia's Mother

Life Lessons in the Pediatric ER

Julia's Mother

A real-life pediatric emergency room doctor reveals the trials, heartbreaks, and triumphs of his work. It's a place of intense human drama, life's highest hopes and deepest despairs. A place we rarely get to see through a doctor's eyes. But now the emergency room at a children's hospita is revealed in a moving and personal notembook by William Bondio, MD. It recounts the lessons a doctor learns beyond the textbooks, revealing insights into the human condition at its most vulnerable and courageous moments--from the patient who, after intense medical therapy, gives up the will to live, to the sick newborn baby who never would. We feel the power of a mother's instinct to advocate for her handicapped child, and observe the wisdom of an immigrant father who intuitively senses things the doctors cannot. Finally, with the mother of a young patient named Julia we share in the nobility of a parent's unending search to find meaning in tragedy.

Scorched Earth

Scorched Earth

From the bestselling author of WAR OF THE RATS comes a novel of searing intensity and uncompromising vision . . . The inhabitants of Good Hope, Virginia, haven't felt the cooling effects of rain in weeks. With the town a tinderbox waiting to explode, all it will take is a spark to ignite the rage and hatred so carefully hidden. And then a tragedy occurs. A baby is born and dies in her mother's arms. The child, Nora Carol, is buried quickly and quietly the next day in the churchyard. It should have ended there, but it didn't, for Nora Carol is of mixed race. The white deacons of Good Hope's Victory Baptist Church, trying to protect the centuries-old traditions of their cemetery, have the body exhumed. That night the church is set ablaze, and the sole witness is the only suspect - Elijah, Nora Carol's father. What follows is a legal case that reveals a host of hidden prejudices, incendiary secrets, and ultimately, an act of justice that has nothing to do with the law . . .

We'll Sing at Dawn

A family struggle to survive the Blitz

We'll Sing at Dawn

In the cold nights of the Blitz, her music warmed their hearts... Victor Pemberton writes a compelling wartime saga in We'll Sing at Dawn, the story of a family's experiences of the London Blitz. Perfect for fans of Dee Williams and Harry Bowling. 'Captures the wartime spirit down to the last wail of the air raid siren... History with a heart on its sleeve' - Northern Echo September 1940, Islington. The Blitz is taking its toll on Beth Shanks and her family. An aerial torpedo has recently devastated a complete block of flats and shops in Seven Sisters Road, and traumatised the whole neighbourhood. Beth works as a munitions worker at a factory in North Finchley and dodges falling shrapnel on her way to work. Her younger brother Phil is a teenage cyclist messenger in the Auxiliary Fire Service and he's been twice dug out of rubble as he carried important messages. Beth's father is away fighting and her mother Connie teaches piano lessons to children who've escaped evacuation. Connie despairs that Beth won't learn how to play the piano properly and will only play popular songs by ear, but when she hears Beth playing the piano to lift the spirits of local people trapped in an air raid, she realises there is much more to music than she ever realised... What readers are saying about We'll Sing at Dawn: 'Victor Pemberton's books are excellent' 'Five stars'