The Omnivore S Dilemma

Author: Michael Pollan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101147172
Size: 61.31 MB
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One of the New York Times Book Review's Ten Best Books of the Year Winner of the James Beard Award Author of #1 New York Times Bestsellers In Defense of Food and Food Rules What should we have for dinner? Ten years ago, Michael Pollan confronted us with this seemingly simple question and, with The Omnivore’s Dilemma, his brilliant and eye-opening exploration of our food choices, demonstrated that how we answer it today may determine not only our health but our survival as a species. In the years since, Pollan’s revolutionary examination has changed the way Americans think about food. Bringing wide attention to the little-known but vitally important dimensions of food and agriculture in America, Pollan launched a national conversation about what we eat and the profound consequences that even the simplest everyday food choices have on both ourselves and the natural world. Ten years later, The Omnivore’s Dilemma continues to transform the way Americans think about the politics, perils, and pleasures of eating. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Summary And Analysis Of The Omnivore S Dilemma A Natural History Of Four Meals 1

Author: Worth Books
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1504044843
Size: 67.98 MB
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So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of The Omnivore’s Dilemma tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Michael Pollan’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of The Omnivore’s Dilemma includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter summaries Profiles of the main characters Detailed timeline of events Important quotes Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan: In the perennial bestseller The Omnivore’s Dilemma, acclaimed journalist Michael Pollan not only reports back from the frontlines of America’s dysfunctional food industry, but gets down and dirty with the scrappy farmers and foragers who have decided to “opt out” of the industrial food chain. Informative, entertaining, and often alarming, The Omnivore’s Dilemma examines dietary trends, the origins of what we eat, and the impact of our food choices on the environment and our health, and sheds desperately needed light on the saying “you are what you eat.” The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.

The Omnivore S Dilemma

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781442098459
Size: 66.45 MB
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Delves into facts about food, life expectancy as it relates to consumption, and global health implications resulting from food choices made by people around the world, encouraging readers to consider their food choices and eating habits.

The Omnivore S Dilemma For Young Readers

Author: Michael Pollan
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780803735002
Size: 54.90 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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'What's for dinner?' seemed like a simple question - until journalist and supermarket detective Michael Pollan delved behind the scenes. From fast food and big organic to small farms and old-fashioned hunting and gathering, this young readers' adaptation of Pollan's food-chain exploration aims to encourage kids to consider the personal and global health implications of their food choices. In a compelling format with updated facts, photos, graphs, and visuals.

Let Thy Food Be Thy Medicine

Author: Kathleen Hefferon
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199873976
Size: 51.12 MB
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This book is a response to the current flood of conflicting information regarding the use of plants for both consumption and medicinal purposes. Kathleen Hefferon addresses the myths and popular beliefs surrounding the application of plants in human health, revealing both their truths and inaccuracies, and provides an overview of the technologies scientists are using to further their research.

Humans In Nature

Author: Gregory E. Kaebnick
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199347239
Size: 23.38 MB
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Contemporary debates over issues as wide-ranging as the protection of wildernesses and endangered species, the spread of genetically modified organisms, the emergence of synthetic biology, and the advance of human enhancement, all of which seem to spin into deeper and more baffling questions with every change in the news cycle, often circle back to the same fundamental question: should there be limits to the human alteration of the natural world? A growing number of people view the human capacity to alter natural states of affairs -- from formerly wild spaces and things around us to crops and livestock to our own human nature -- as cause for moral alarm. That reaction raises a number of perplexing philosophical questions, however: Can we identify "natural" states of affairs at all? Does the idea of being morally concerned about the human relationship to nature make any sense? Should such a concern influence public policy and politics, or should government stay strenuously neutral on such matters? Through a study of moral debates about the environment, agricultural biotechnology, synthetic biology, and human enhancement, Gregory E. Kaebnick, a research scholar at The Hastings Center and editor of the Hastings Center Report, argues that concerns about the human alteration of nature can be legitimate and serious, but also that they are complex, contestable, and of limited political force. Kaebnick defends attempts to identify "natural" states of affairs by disentangling the nature/artifact distinction from metaphysical hoariness. Drawing on David Hume, he also defends moral standards for the human relationship to nature, arguing that they, and moral standards generally, should be understood as grounded in what Hume called the "passions." Yet what counts as "natural" can be delineated only roughly, he concludes, and moral standards for interaction with nature are less a matter of obligation than of ideals. Kaebnick also concludes, drawing on an interpretation of the liberal principle of neutrality, that government may support those standards but must be careful not to enforce them. Thus Kaebnick looks for a middle way on debates that have tended toward polarization. "As differences between nature and artifact become steadily less substantial, problems about preservation run to the core of how people can make sense of themselves, of each other, and of our shared world. Kaebnick's solutions are creative and compelling, theoretically elegant and politically practical. Providing distinctive ways forward, when much academic and policy discussion seems exhausted, his book demands wide attention. In return, it inspires hope." - James Nelson, Michigan State University

Creation Care

Author: Christianity Today International
Publisher: Thomas Nelson Inc
ISBN: 1418534137
Size: 15.48 MB
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Each eight-week study is based on articles written by today's leading Christian authors and published by Christianity Today magazines. These remarkable studies foster deep, authentic, and relevant discussion that will challenge and grow any small group.

Eating History

Author: Andrew F. Smith
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231511752
Size: 11.71 MB
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Food expert and celebrated food historian Andrew F. Smith recounts in delicious detail the creation of contemporary American cuisine. The diet of the modern American wasn't always as corporate, conglomerated, and corn-rich as it is today, and the style of American cooking, along with the ingredients that compose it, has never been fixed. With a cast of characters including bold inventors, savvy restaurateurs, ruthless advertisers, mad scientists, adventurous entrepreneurs, celebrity chefs, and relentless health nuts, Smith pins down the truly crackerjack history behind the way America eats. Smith's story opens with early America, an agriculturally independent nation where most citizens grew and consumed their own food. Over the next two hundred years, however, Americans would cultivate an entirely different approach to crops and consumption. Advances in food processing, transportation, regulation, nutrition, and science introduced highly complex and mechanized methods of production. The proliferation of cookbooks, cooking shows, and professionally designed kitchens made meals more commercially, politically, and culturally potent. To better understand these trends, Smith delves deeply and humorously into their creation. Ultimately he shows how, by revisiting this history, we can reclaim the independent, locally sustainable roots of American food.

Toxic Archipelago

Author: Brett L. Walker
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295803010
Size: 73.44 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Every person on the planet is entangled in a web of ecological relationships that link farms and factories with human consumers. Our lives depend on these relationships -- and are imperiled by them as well. Nowhere is this truer than on the Japanese archipelago. During the nineteenth century, Japan saw the rise of Homo sapiens industrialis, a new breed of human transformed by an engineered, industrialized, and poisonous environment. Toxins moved freely from mines, factory sites, and rice paddies into human bodies. Toxic Archipelago explores how toxic pollution works its way into porous human bodies and brings unimaginable pain to some of them. Brett Walker examines startling case studies of industrial toxins that know no boundaries: deaths from insecticide contaminations; poisonings from copper, zinc, and lead mining; congenital deformities from methylmercury factory effluents; and lung diseases from sulfur dioxide and asbestos. This powerful, probing book demonstrates how the Japanese archipelago has become industrialized over the last two hundred years -- and how people and the environment have suffered as a consequence.