The Quiet Room

Author: Lori Schiller
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0446549355
Size: 39.59 MB
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Moving, harrowing, and ultimately uplifting, Lori Schiller's memoir is a classic testimony to the ravages of mental illness and the power of perseverance and courage. At seventeen Lori Schiller was the perfect child-the only daughter of an affluent, close-knit family. Six years later she made her first suicide attempt, then wandered the streets of New York City dressed in ragged clothes, tormenting voices crying out in her mind. Lori Schiller had entered the horrifying world of full-blown schizophrenia. She began an ordeal of hospitalizations, halfway houses, relapses, more suicide attempts, and constant, withering despair. But against all odds, she survived. In this personal account, she tells how she did it, taking us not only into her own shattered world, but drawing on the words of the doctors who treated her and family members who suffered with her.

The Quiet Room

Author: Schiller Lori Bennett Amanda
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780446619783
Size: 48.50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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At a summer camp in 1976, a 17-year-old girl suddenly hears a voice in the night. Booming out through the darkness, it makes her bolt awake. It says things that she has never before imagined. And it will be with her for years to come, tormenting her, robbing her of her sanity and very nearly her life. Lori Schiller was the perfect child - bright, affectionate, and joyfully alive. The firstborn and only daughter of a close-knit family she led a carefree, tranquil life, unaware that within her a secret illness was taking root. Then, at age 17, she began to hear voices in her mind. She told no one. Although the voices became more frequent and sinister, she still managed to graduate from high school, go to a good college, even begin a career. By 23, the voices seemed to take total control: Lori made her first suicide attempt. Soon she was pulled into the mental health care system, beginning an ordeal of institutions, halfway houses, relapses, more suicide attempts and a screaming, full-blown schizophrenia that seemed beyond the reach of any cure. As a chronicle of Lori's madness, The Quiet Room offers a rare and powerful look into a terrifying shadow world. But The Quiet Room is even more remarkable because Lori herself has been able to describe her ordeal. In 1989, she began to emerge from the darkness - driven by her own will to survive and an experimental new medication that gave her the first inner peace she had known in years. Drawing on Lori's own diaries and fragmented memories, as well as accounts from her family, friends, and doctors, this book takes us into the terrible "quiet room," the isolation chamber in which she was confined when the voices overtook her through the therapy sessions and relapses all the way to Lori's triumphant recovery. Perhaps the most important book ever written about schizophrenia, The Quiet Room is as powerful today as I Never Promised You a Rose Garden was in its time. It offers hope for anyone touched by mental illness - and is a lesson in survival and courage for us all.

The Quiet Room

Author: Lori Schiller
Publisher: Grand Central Pub
ISBN: 9780446517775
Size: 48.40 MB
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Presents the inner life of a schizophrenic through diary excerpts and interviews with family members and doctors

Exploraciones

Author: Mary Ann Blitt
Publisher: Heinle & Heinle Pub
ISBN: 9781428206410
Size: 45.53 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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"A student-tested, faculty-approved introductory program for learning Spanish"--Cover.

Our Most Troubling Madness

Author: Jocelyn Marrow
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520291085
Size: 78.28 MB
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Schizophrenia has long puzzled researchers in the fields of psychiatric medicine and anthropology. Why is it that the rates of developing schizophrenia—long the poster child for the biomedical model of psychiatric illness—are low in some countries and higher in others? And why do migrants to Western countries find that they are at higher risk for this disease after they arrive? T. M. Luhrmann and Jocelyn Marrow argue that the root causes of schizophrenia are not only biological, but also sociocultural. This book gives an intimate, personal account of those living with serious psychotic disorder in the United States, India, Africa, and Southeast Asia. It introduces the notion that social defeat—the physical or symbolic defeat of one person by another—is a core mechanism in the increased risk for psychotic illness. Furthermore, “care-as-usual” treatment as it occurs in the United States actually increases the likelihood of social defeat, while “care-as-usual” treatment in a country like India diminishes it.

Health Humanities Reader

Author: Therese Jones
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 081357367X
Size: 22.25 MB
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Over the past forty years, the health humanities, previously called the medical humanities, has emerged as one of the most exciting fields for interdisciplinary scholarship, advancing humanistic inquiry into bioethics, human rights, health care, and the uses of technology. It has also helped inspire medical practitioners to engage in deeper reflection about the human elements of their practice. In Health Humanities Reader, editors Therese Jones, Delese Wear, and Lester D. Friedman have assembled fifty-four leading scholars, educators, artists, and clinicians to survey the rich body of work that has already emerged from the field—and to imagine fresh approaches to the health humanities in these original essays. The collection’s contributors reflect the extraordinary diversity of the field, including scholars from the disciplines of disability studies, history, literature, nursing, religion, narrative medicine, philosophy, bioethics, medicine, and the social sciences. With warmth and humor, critical acumen and ethical insight, Health Humanities Reader truly humanizes the field of medicine. Its accessible language and broad scope offers something for everyone from the experienced medical professional to a reader interested in health and illness.

Hidden Valley Road

Author: Robert Kolker
Publisher: Doubleday
ISBN: 0385543778
Size: 60.34 MB
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The heartrending story of a midcentury American family with twelve children, six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia, that became science's great hope in the quest to understand the disease. Don and Mimi Galvin seemed to be living the American dream. After World War II, Don's work with the Air Force brought them to Colorado, where their twelve children perfectly spanned the baby boom: the oldest born in 1945, the youngest in 1965. In those years, there was an established script for a family like the Galvins--aspiration, hard work, upward mobility, domestic harmony--and they worked hard to play their parts. But behind the scenes was a different story: psychological breakdown, sudden shocking violence, hidden abuse. By the mid-1970s, six of the ten Galvin boys, one after another, were diagnosed as schizophrenic. How could all this happen to one family? What took place inside the house on Hidden Valley Road was so extraordinary that the Galvins became one of the first families to be studied by the National Institute of Mental Health. Their story offers a shadow history of the science of schizophrenia, from the era of institutionalization, lobotomy, and the schizophrenogenic mother to the search for genetic markers for the disease, always amid profound disagreements about the nature of the illness itself. And unbeknownst to the Galvins, samples of their DNA informed decades of genetic research that continues today, offering paths to treatment, prediction, and even eradication of the disease for future generations. With clarity and compassion, bestselling and award-winning author Robert Kolker uncovers one family's unforgettable legacy of suffering, love, and hope.

Stories We Ve Heard Stories We Ve Told

Author: Jeffrey Kottler
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199328277
Size: 39.62 MB
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This is a book that integrates what is known from a wide variety of disciplines about the nature of storytelling and how it influences and transforms people's lives. Drawing on material from the humanities, sociology, anthropology, neurophysiology, media and communication studies, narrative inquiry, indigenous healing traditions, as well as education, counseling, and therapy, the book explores the ways that therapists operate as professional storytellers. In addition, our job is to hold and honor the stories of our clients, helping them to reshape them in more constructive ways. The book itself is written as a story, utilizing engaging prose, research, photographs, and powerful anecdotes to draw readers into the intriguing dynamics and processes involved in therapeutic storytelling. It sets the stage for what follows by discussing the ways that stories have influenced history, cultural development, and individual worldviews and then delves into the ways that everyday lives are impacted by the stories we hear, read, and view in popular media. The focus then moves to stories within the context of therapy, exploring how client stories are told, heard, and negotiated in sessions. Attention then moves to the ways that therapists can become more skilled and accomplished storytellers, regardless of their theoretical preferences and style.

Schizophrenia For Dummies

Author: Jerome Levine
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470444878
Size: 41.15 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Practical tools for leading a happy, productive life Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling mental disorder that afflicts one percent of the population, an estimated 2.5 million people in America alone. The firsthand advice in this reassuring guide will empower the families and caregivers of schizophrenia patients to take charge, offering expert advice on identifying the warning signs, choosing the right health professional, understanding currently available drugs and those on the horizon (as well as their side effects), and evaluating traditional and alternative therapies.

In The Fellowship Of His Suffering

Author: Elahe Hessamfar
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630874671
Size: 76.33 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Schizophrenia" is by many accounts the most devastating illness of our time. In this book, Elahe Hessamfar uses her personal encounter with her daughter's illness to bring the reader to experience the pain and anguish of those who suffer so intensely. She candidly discusses the gripping and dark realities her family has faced in the midst of this journey and exposes that the ride isn't easy, but it can be fruitful and purposeful, and it can be a journey of joy and peace if understood from the intended perspective. This is a fascinating and deeply theological portrayal of madness under the mighty hand of God. It challenges and awakens the reader to a heightened awareness about self, community, pain, brokenness, sin, grace, and redemption. This is the first truly biblically based, theological interpretation of madness in conversation with psychiatry and social sciences. Hessamfar passionately discusses the shortcomings of our current medical model of mental illness and directs the reader's attention to the mistreatment of those the medical community labels with "schizophrenia." She argues that not only is "schizophrenia" not pathological but it touches on the most fundamental fragilities of the human soul, and hence, it is a critical pastoral issue. Hessamfar offers tangible, inspiring, and life-changing solutions for those dealing with this most elusive and mysterious phenomenon--solutions that would bring hope and healing to the hopeless people chained in the abyss of madness.