The Road to Ruin

how Tony Abbott and Peta Credlin destroyed their own government

The Road to Ruin

WINNER OF THE 2017 AUSTRALIAN BOOK INDUSTRY AWARDS, GENERAL NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR WINNER OF THE 2016 MELBOURNE PRESS CLUB LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD ‘There will be no wrecking, no undermining, and no sniping.’ –Tony Abbott, 15 September 2015 Abbott’s performances in the party-room debates on education and climate change had ranged between woeful and pathetic. He sounded desperate, he was inconsistent, and — his colleagues thought — slightly ridiculous. They knew he would never stop going after cheap headlines during soft interviews where he sucked up the oxygen, with revision and division as his calling cards. All they could hope was that people would soon grow tired of listening to him. Normal people might have, but the media grew more and more hysterical, as if a challenge were imminent. In the original edition of The Road to Ruin, prominent political commentator, author, and columnist for The Australian Niki Savva revealed the ruinous behaviour of former prime minister Tony Abbott and his chief of staff, Peta Credlin. Based on her unrivalled access to their colleagues, and devastating first-person accounts of what went on behind the scenes, Savva painted an unforgettable picture of a unique duo who wielded power ruthlessly but not well. That edition became a major bestseller, and went on to win an Australian book industry award for the best general non-fiction book of the year. Now Savva continues where she left off. This updated edition contains a new, 13,500-word final chapter, in which Savva reveals the inner state of the Turnbull government — and the behind-the-scenes jockeying of friends and foes alike. From Christopher Pyne’s career-stalling own goal, to Peter Dutton’s post-Turnbull leadership ambitions, to Tony Abbott’s ramped-up destabilisation campaign, it is, as usual, an unputdownable and impeccably sourced account. PRAISE FOR NIKI SAVVA ‘This is what you have to remember about Savva’s controversial book, The Road to Ruin: she was onto this story early and she ran with it in her weekly column … her account of the coup is both suspenseful and full of fascinating, granular detail.’ The Sydney Morning Herald ‘[W]ell researched and well written, with a sharp eye — albeit with an occasional, serrated edge. Savva has written a book in which it is easy to be immersed. The narrative unfolds in a convincing flow, sourced directly from the words of many of the players: the bruised and battered; the disillusioned and disaffected; and ultimately in the triumphant voices of the Coalition plotters … [A] compelling book that has established an indelible and influential benchmark for explaining the turbulent rise and tumultuous fall of the Abbott government.’ The Weekend Australian

Fear of Abandonment

Australia in the World since 1942

Fear of Abandonment


Cryptodemocracy

How Blockchain Can Radically Expand Democratic Choice

Cryptodemocracy

This book investigates the theoretical and practical implications of blockchain and other distributed ledger technologies for democratic decision making. The authors examine theoretical characteristics before exploring specific applications of cryptodemocracy in labor bargaining and corporate governance.

Double Disillusion

The 2016 Australian Federal Election

Double Disillusion

This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the 2016 Australian federal election. Won by the Liberal–National Coalition by the slimmest of margins, the result created a climate of political uncertainty that threatened the government’s lower house majority. While the campaign might have lacked the theatre of previous elections, it provides significant insights into the contemporary political and policy challenges facing Australian democracy and society today. In this, the 16th edited collection of Australian election studies, 41 contributors from a range of disciplines bring an unprecedented depth of expertise to the 2016 contest. The book covers the context, key battles and issues in the campaign, and reports and analyses the results in detail. It provides an evaluation of the role of political actors such as the parties, independents, the media, interest groups and GetUp!, and examines election debate in the online space. Experts from a range of policy fields provide an analysis of election issues ranging from the economy and industrial relations to social policy, the environment, and gender and sexuality. Each of the chapters is written on the basis of in‑depth and original research, providing new insights into this important political event.

The Palgrave Handbook of Leadership in Transforming Asia

The Palgrave Handbook of Leadership in Transforming Asia

This handbook provides a comprehensive overview and evaluation of the variety of organizational leadership issues within the Asian region. It highlights the relationship between leaders and their followers, and the complexity of leadership research and practices in Asian transformational economies. Covering a wide range of contexts and perspectives, the chapters are based on empirical studies with evidence-based findings that can be used as case studies for academics and practitioners. The handbook makes significant contributions to leadership theory including practice and assists international researchers, practitioners and students in understanding the influence of the Asian culture and its impact on leadership.

Politics, Media and Democracy in Australia

Public and Producer Perceptions of the Political Public Sphere

Politics, Media and Democracy in Australia

In Australia, as in many comparable democracies, the role of the media in the political process is high on the public agenda. There is a perception of widespread disillusionment with and disengagement from politics amongst voters, and criticism of the media for failing to fulfil their democratic responsibilities adequately. This book evaluates public perceptions of the performance of the political media in the context of the declared aims and objectives of media producers. From there the authors present findings for improving the capacity of political media to engage and inform their audiences in ways which enhance the quality and popular legitimacy of the democratic process. These conclusions are of import not only to Australians, but to observers of mediated politics in the UK, the US and other countries where similar debates around the ‘crisis of public communication’ are on-going.

Plots and Prayers

Malcolm Turnbull's Demise and Scott Morrison's Ascension

Plots and Prayers

In an enthralling sequel to her bestselling The Road to Ruin, Niki Savva reveals the inside story of a bungled coup that overthrew the Liberal prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, and installed a surprise successor, Scott Morrison, who went on to take the party to a miraculous electoral victory. On 21 August 2018, 35 Liberal MPs cast their vote against Malcolm Turnbull, effectively signalling the end of his leadership. Three days later, the deed was done, and Scott Morrison was anointed prime minister. Tony Abbott's relentless campaign of destabilisation, helped along by his acolytes in the parliament and by his powerful media mates, the betrayals of colleagues, and the rise of the religious right -- climaxing in Peter Dutton's challenge -- all played a part in Turnbull's downfall. But so did Turnbull's own poor political judgement. He was a good prime minister and a terrible politician. The good bits of Malcolm were not enough to make up for the bad Malcolm. Nevertheless, the sheer brutality of his removal left many Liberals aghast. MPs were traumatised or humiliated by eight days of madness. Men and women cried from sheer anguish. They went through hell, and feared when it was over that they would not make it back -- and nor would the Liberal Party. As it turned out, redemption came with Morrison's unexpected single-handed 2019 election victory. Turnbull's road ended in ruins, as it was always bound to and as he always knew it would, as he predicted to Niki Savva less than three years before it happened. But when his end was imminent, he could not bear to let go. And when it was over, he was defiant, fragile -- and, yes -- vengeful. This is the inside story of what happened -- and what happened next.

So Greek

Confessions of a Conservative Leftie

So Greek

Most books on politics are written by outsiders. Even if they are written by politicians, a lot of the intrigue and detail seems to be missing. It usually is. This is one of the few books on politics and political journalism written by an insider and one with decades of experience in federal politics. It is often hilarious, occasionally sad, sometimes infuriating, but endlessly fascinating and illuminating as it takes us on a life journey: from one country to another, from one culture to another, from one career to another, from one philosophy to another.