The Silmarillion

Author: J.R.R. Tolkien
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547951981
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A number-one New York Times bestseller when it was originally published, THE SILMARILLION is the core of J.R.R. Tolkien's imaginative writing, a work whose origins stretch back to a time long before THE HOBBIT. Tolkien considered THE SILMARILLION his most important work, and, though it was published last and posthumously, this great collection of tales and legends clearly sets the stage for all his other writing. The story of the creation of the world and of the the First Age, this is the ancient drama to which the characters in THE LORD OF THE RINGS look back and in whose events some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part. The three Silmarils were jewels created by Feanor, most gifted of the Elves. Within them was imprisoned the Light of the Two Trees of Valinor before the Trees themselves were destroyed by Morgoth, the first Dark Lord. Thereafter, the unsullied Light of Valinor lived on only in the Silmarils, but they were seized by Morgoth and set in his crown, which was guarded in the impenetrable fortress of Angband in the north of Middle-earth. THE SILMARILLION is the history of the rebellion of Feanor and his kindred against the gods, their exile from Valinor and return to Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all their heroism, against the great Enemy. This second edition features a letter written by J.R.R. Tolkien describing his intentions for the book, which serves as a brilliant exposition of his conception of the earlier Ages of Middle-earth.

The Silmarillion

Author: J. R. R. Tolkien
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
ISBN: 0007322569
Size: 34.29 MB
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The popular paperback edition with a cover design by Tolkien himself, to complement the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings paperbacks. Includes a special preface by J.R.R. Tolkien.

The Silmarillion

Author: J. R. R. Tolkien; Christopher Tolkien; Ted Nasmith
Publisher: The New York Times® Best Sellers: Books
ISBN:
Size: 15.28 MB
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SUMMARY: The tales of The Silmarillion were the underlying inspiration and source of J.R.R. Tolkien's imaginative writing; he worked on the book throughout his life but never brought it to a final form. Long preceding in its origins The Lord of the Rings, it is the story of the First Age of Tolkien's world, the ancient drama to which characters in The Lord of the RIngs look back and in which some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part. The title Silmarillion is shortened from Quenta Silmarillion, "The History of the Silmarils," the three great jewels created by Feanor, most gifted of the Elves, in which he imprisoned the light of the Two Trees that illumined Valinor, the land of the gods. When Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, destroyed the Trees, that light lived on only in the Silmarils; Morgoth seized them and set them in his crown, guarded in the impenetrable fortress of Angband in the north of Middle-earth. The Silmarillion is the history of the rebellion of Feanor and his people against the gods, their exile in Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all the heroisim of Elves and Men, against the great Enemy. The book includes several other, shorter works beside The Silmarillion proper. Preceding it are "Ainulindale," the myth of Creation, and "Valaquenta," in which the nature and powers of each of the gods is set forth. After The Silmarillion is "Akallabeth," the story of the downfall of the great island kingdom of Numenor at the end of the Second Age; completing the volume is "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age," in which the events of The Lord of the Rings are treated in the manner of The Silmarillion. This new edition of The Silmarillion contains the revised and corrected "second edition" text and, by way of introduction, a letter written by J.R.R. Tolkien in 1951, which provides a brilliant exposition of his conception of the earlier Ages. It also contains almost fifty full-color illustrations by the artist Ted Nasmith, many of which appear for the first time.

The Silmarillion

Author: John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780618126989
Size: 67.90 MB
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Tales and legends chronicling the world's beginnings and the happenings of the First Age, focusing on the theft of the Simarils--the three jewels crafted by Fèeanor--by Morgoth, first Dark Lord of Middle-earth.

The Complete Guide To Middle Earth

Author: Robert Foster
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
ISBN: 0261102524
Size: 25.93 MB
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This is an A-Z guide to the names, places and events in the fantasy world of J.R.R. TOLKIEN. Middle-Earth, the world in which the stories take place, is as real and complex as our own. Events, geography and names were created with care and loving attention by Tolkien, who wanted every single detail of his books to fit into their total pattern. A belief in perfection, the fun of the sub-creation and the desire to create something totally convincing involved him in map-making, endless charts of dates and events and the development of his many invented languages.

The Silmarillion

Author: Books Group Staff
Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series
ISBN: 9781157662969
Size: 45.66 MB
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 91. Chapters: Characters in The Silmarillion, Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age, Akallab th, Ungoliant, Gil-galad, Manw, Valaquenta, E rendil, Glorfindel, Varda, F anor, Aul, Ulmo, Elros, Celebrimbor, Nienna, Finw, Oss, Elwing, Ainulindal, Glaurung, Beren, L thien, Melian, Thingol, Finrod Felagund, Finarfin, Maedhros, Caranthir, Fingolfin, Barahir, Angrod, Orodreth, Sauron, T rin Turambar, Morgoth, Galadriel, Quenta Silmarillion, Red Book of Westmarch, Elrond, Hador, C rdan, H rin, Easterlings, Ni nor N niel, E l, Tuor, Beleg, Morwen, Brandir, Maglor, Curufin, Eru Il vatar, Idril, Dior Eluch l, Celegorm, Aredhel, Finduilas, Fingon, Maeglin, Voronw, Erendis, B or, Turgon, Marach, Huor, Ecthelion of the Fountain, Carcharoth, Lalaith, Amras, M m, E nw, Haleth, Gorlim, Halmir, Aerin, R an, Mablung, Dorlas, Haldir, Arien, Amrod, Uinen, Tilion, Ilmar, Nimloth, Elur d and Elur n, Salmar, Thuringwethil. Excerpt: Sauron (pronounced ) is the primary antagonist and titular character of the epic fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. In the same work, he is revealed to be the same character as "the Necromancer" from Tolkien's earlier novel The Hobbit. In Tolkien's The Silmarillion (published posthumously by Tolkien's son Christopher Tolkien), he is also revealed to have been the chief lieutenant of the first Dark Lord, Morgoth. Tolkien noted that the "angelic" powers of his constructed myth "were capable of many degrees of error and failing," but by far the worst was "the absolute Satanic rebellion and evil of Morgoth and his satellite Sauron." The cosmological myth prefixed to The Silmarillion explains how the supreme being Eru initiated his creation by bringing into being innumerable spirits, "the offspring of his thought," who were with him before anything else had been made. The being later known as Sauron...

Tolkien And Sanskrit Second Expanded Edition

Author: Mark T. Hooker
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781540435484
Size: 67.77 MB
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This is "The Director''s Cut," as a cinematographically minded wag termed it. This study is based on the observation that Tolkien calqued the names of the Sapta Sindhavah (Seven Rivers) from the Rig Veda as the Seven Rivers of Ossiriand. In other words, Tolkien created seven Elvish river names that mean the same thing as the river names of the Sapta Sindhavah. Much has been said of Tolkien''s use of Welsh, Old English, Gothic, Icelandic, Russian, Greek, and Latin. Little, however, has been said about Tolkien''s use of Sanskrit (Refined Speech), the great-great-...grandfather of all the languages above. Sanskrit was spoken in the second millennium B.C. in the valley of the River Indus, the river that put the "Indo" in the name Proto-Indo-European, a linguistic term for the *reconstructed common ancestor of the European languages. All indications to the contrary (C&G ii, 461), there is little doubt about Tolkien''s knowledge of Sanskrit from the point of view of a linguist. It is de rigueur for any serious philologist interested in etymologies like Tolkien. Tolkien was on the Language side of the English School at Oxford, where he took Comparative Philology as a special subject for Honour Moderations. (G&G ii, 758) In a certain sense, Tolkien''s The Silmarillion can be considered a veiled member of the genre of Raj Literature. The names of The Silmarillion say that in the same way that the names in Tolkien''s poem "The Mewlips" are masks that hide the fact that it is a poem about World War I. As the present study shows, the names of The Silmarillion say that the locus of Tolkien''s "Mythology for England" (C&G ii, 244-248) is the India of the British Raj. A literary analysis of Tolkien''s place in Raj Literature is, however, much more speculative than the linguistic analysis that makes up the core of this study, which stands on solid philological ground. The literary analysis will, therefore, be left to another time and place. While the basis of Tolkien''s calque of the names of the Seven Rivers as Ossiriand is Vedic in concept, the superstructure that Tolkien builds upon this foundation is non-Vedic. Some elements of the superstructure are more readily attributable to historical sources, like the history of the India Campaign of Alexander the Great, and the history of the British Raj in India, both of which were a part of the school curriculum when Tolkien was growing up. While the analysis of some of the words | names in this study would not be believable in stand-alone articles, in the context of the coherent structure of words and names presented here, they are worthy of serious consideration. The discovery presented here has the potential to more clearly define the linguistic and philosophical cradle of Tolkien''s ''Mythology for England,'' which was always The Silmarillion, and never The Lord of the Rings. It is Proto-Indo-European in the same way that the English language stems from Proto-Indo-European. That does not, however, mean that there is no gap between Proto-Indo-European language and culture, and the language and culture of The Shire. The analysis that follows is not a rehash of the discredited ideas of The Shores of Middle-earth (1981). It is instead, a completely new, linguistic approach to Tolkien''s Silmarillion nomenclature. Also from this author: Tolkien Through Russian Eyes (Walking Tree Publishers, 2003), published simultaneously in Russian. "Frodo''s Batman," Tolkien Studies, No. 1 (2004) A Tolkienian Mathomium (Llyfrawr, 2006) The Hobbitonian Anthology (Llyfrawr, 2009) "Reading John Buchan in Search of Tolkien," Tolkien and the Study of His Sources, Jason Fisher (ed.). (McFarland, 2011) Tolkien and Welsh (Llyfrawr, 2012) The Tolkienaeum (Llyfrawr, 2014) Iter Tolkienensis (Llyfrawr, 2016)