The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets

The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets

You may have watched hundreds of episodes of The Simpsons (and its sister show Futurama) without ever realising that they contain enough maths to form an entire university course. In The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets, Simon Singh explains how the brilliant writers, some of the mathematicians, have smuggled in mathematical jokes throughout the cartoon's twenty-five year history, exploring everything from to Mersenne primes, from Euler's equation to the unsolved riddle of P vs. NP, from perfect numbers to narcissistic numbers, and much more. With wit, clarity and a true fan's zeal, Singh analyses such memorable episodes as 'Bart the Genius' and 'Homer3' to offer an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.

The Code Book: The Secrets Behind Codebreaking

The Code Book: The Secrets Behind Codebreaking

"As gripping as a good thriller." --The Washington Post Unpack the science of secrecy and discover the methods behind cryptography--the encoding and decoding of information--in this clear and easy-to-understand young adult adaptation of the national bestseller that's perfect for this age of WikiLeaks, the Sony hack, and other events that reveal the extent to which our technology is never quite as secure as we want to believe. Coders and codebreakers alike will be fascinated by history's most mesmerizing stories of intrigue and cunning--from Julius Caesar and his Caeser cipher to the Allies' use of the Enigma machine to decode German messages during World War II. Accessible, compelling, and timely, The Code Book is sure to make readers see the past--and the future--in a whole new way. "Singh's power of explaining complex ideas is as dazzling as ever." --The Guardian

Thomas Pynchon, Sex, and Gender

Thomas Pynchon, Sex, and Gender

Thomas Pynchon's fiction has been considered masculinist, misogynist, phallocentric, and pornographic: its formal experimentation, irony, and ambiguity have been taken both to complicate such judgments and to be parts of the problem. To the present day, deep critical divisions persist as to whether Pynchon's representations of women are sexist, feminist, or reflective of a more general misanthropy, whether his writing of sex is boorishly pornographic or effectually transgressive, whether queer identities are celebrated or mocked, and whether his departures from realist convention express masculinist elitism or critique the gendering of genre. Thomas Pynchon, Sex, and Gender reframes these debates. As the first book-length investigation of Pynchon's writing to put the topics of sex and gender at its core, it moves beyond binary debates about whether to see Pynchon as liberatory or conservative, instead examining how his preoccupation with sex and gender conditions his fiction's whole worldview. The essays it contains, which cumulatively address all of Pynchon's novels from V. (1963) to Bleeding Edge (2013), investigate such topics as the imbrication of gender and power, sexual abuse and the writing of sex, the gendering of violence, and the shifting representation of the family. Providing a wealth of new approaches to the centrality of sex and gender in Pynchon's work, the collection opens up new avenues for Pynchon studies as a whole.

Mathematics Education

A Spectrum of Work in Mathematical Sciences Departments

Mathematics Education

Many in the mathematics community in the U.S. are involved in mathematics education in various capacities. This book highlights the breadth of the work in K-16 mathematics education done by members of US departments of mathematical sciences. It contains contributions by mathematicians and mathematics educators who do work in areas such as teacher education, quantitative literacy, informal education, writing and communication, social justice, outreach and mentoring, tactile learning, art and mathematics, ethnomathematics, scholarship of teaching and learning, and mathematics education research. Contributors describe their work, its impact, and how it is perceived and valued. In addition, there is a chapter, co-authored by two mathematicians who have become administrators, on the challenges of supporting, evaluating, and rewarding work in mathematics education in departments of mathematical sciences. This book is intended to inform the readership of the breadth of the work and to encourage discussion of its value in the mathematical community. The writing is expository, not technical, and should be accessible and informative to a diverse audience. The primary readership includes all those in departments of mathematical sciences in two or four year colleges and universities, and their administrators, as well as graduate students. Researchers in education may also find topics of interest. Other potential readers include those doing work in mathematics education in schools of education, and teachers of secondary or middle school mathematics as well as those involved in their professional development.

The Code Book

How to Make It, Break It, Hack It, Crack it

The Code Book

Provides a review of cryptography, its evolution over time, and its purpose throughout history from the era of Julius Caesar to the modern day.

The Paranormal Source Book

The Comprehensive Guide to Strange Phenomena Worldwide

The Paranormal Source Book

This revised edition contains all the main paranormal topics, ranging from apparitions and zoological mysteries, to ball lightning, crop circles, ESP, poltergeists, premonitions and UFOs, as well as new information on conspiracy theories, ancient wisdom and electronic pollution. The author gives details of the main cases in each area plus up-to-the-minute events, thinking, research and experiments. It also offers a comprehensive reading list of books and publications available within each topic, and addresses of recommended research organisations around the world.