The Slave Ship

Author: Marcus Rediker
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781440620843
Size: 43.89 MB
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“Masterly.”—Adam Hochschild, The New York Times Book Review In this widely praised history of an infamous institution, award-winning scholar Marcus Rediker shines a light into the darkest corners of the British and American slave ships of the eighteenth century. Drawing on thirty years of research in maritime archives, court records, diaries, and firsthand accounts, The Slave Ship is riveting and sobering in its revelations, reconstructing in chilling detail a world nearly lost to history: the "floating dungeons" at the forefront of the birth of African American culture.

Many Middle Passages

Author: Emma Christopher
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520252073
Size: 63.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Extends the concept of the Middle Passage to encompass the expropriation of people across other maritime and inland routes. No previous book has highlighted the diversity and centrality of middle passages, voluntary and involuntary, to modern global history."—Kenneth Morgan, author of Slavery and the British Empire "This volume extends the now well-established project of 'Atlantic World Studies' beyond its geographic and chronological frames to a genuinely global analysis of labour migration. It is a work of major importance that sparkles with new discoveries and insights."—Rick Halpern, co-editor of Empire and Others: British Encounters with Indigenous Peoples, 1600-1850

Voyage Of The Slave Ship

Author: Stephen J. May
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476615500
Size: 43.97 MB
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Set against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade, this book traces the development, exhibition and final disposition of one of J.M.W. Turner’s greatest and most memorable paintings. Queen Victoria’s reign (1837–1901) in Great Britain produced unprecedented wealth and luxury. For artists and writers this period was particularly noteworthy in that it gave them the opportunity to both praise their country and criticize its overreaching ambition. At the forefront of these artists and writers were men like J.M.W. Turner, Dickens, Thackeray, Tennyson, and John Ruskin, who created some of the most enduring works of art while exposing many of the social evils of their native land. The book also analyzes the man behind the painting. Aloof, gruff and mysterious, Turner resisted success. He worked as a solitary artist, traveling to Europe, sketching towns along the way, studying nature, and transferring his experiences to finished paintings upon his return to London. The son of a barber, he grew up in London and experienced many of the social issues of the age: slavery and freedom, poverty in the slums, monarchy and democracy, stability and anarchy. He was a poet of nature and its innumerable mysteries.

The Slave Trade

Author: Hugh Thomas
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 147460336X
Size: 16.81 MB
Format: PDF
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The Atlantic slave trade was one of the largest and most elaborate maritime and commercial ventures. Between 1492 and about 1870, ten million or more black slaves were carried from Africa to one port or another of the Americas. In this wide-ranging book, Hugh Thomas follows the development of this massive shift of human lives across the centuries until the slave trade's abolition in the late nineteenth century.

Saltwater Slavery

Author: Stephanie E. Smallwood
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674043770
Size: 24.88 MB
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This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors. Stephanie E. Smallwood offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market. Saltwater Slavery is animated by deep research and gives us a graphic experience of the slave trade from the vantage point of the slaves themselves. The result is both a remarkable transatlantic view of the culture of enslavement, and a painful, intimate vision of the bloody, daily business of the slave trade.

The Amistad Rebellion

Author: Marcus Rediker
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101601051
Size: 52.96 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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On June 28, 1839, the Spanish slave schooner Amistad set sail from Havana on a routine delivery of human cargo. On a moonless night, after four days at sea, the captive Africans rose up, killed the captain, and seized control of the ship. They attempted to sail to a safe port, but were captured by the U.S. Navy and thrown into jail in Connecticut. Their legal battle for freedom eventually made its way to the Supreme Court, where their cause was argued by former president John Quincy Adams. In a landmark ruling, they were freed and eventually returned to Africa. The rebellion became one of the best-known events in the history of American slavery, celebrated as a triumph of the legal system in films and books, all reflecting the elite perspective of the judges, politicians, and abolitionists involved in the case. In this powerful and highly original account, Marcus Rediker reclaims the rebellion for its true proponents: the African rebels who risked death to stake a claim for freedom. Using newly discovered evidence, Rediker reframes the story to show how a small group of courageous men fought and won an epic battle against Spanish and American slaveholders and their governments. He reaches back to Africa to find the rebels’ roots, narrates their cataclysmic transatlantic journey, and unfolds a prison story of great drama and emotion. Featuring vividly drawn portraits of the Africans, their captors, and their abolitionist allies, he shows how the rebels captured the popular imagination and helped to inspire and build a movement that was part of a grand global struggle between slavery and freedom. The actions aboard the Amistad that July night and in the days and months that followed were pivotal events in American and Atlantic history, but not for the reasons we have always thought. The successful Amistad rebellion changed the very nature of the struggle against slavery. As a handful of self-emancipated Africans steered their own course to freedom, they opened a way for millions to follow. This stunning book honors their achievement.

In The Shadow Of Slavery

Author: Judith Ann Carney
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520269969
Size: 60.20 MB
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'In the Shadow of Slavery' explores the wealth of plant life brought to the Americas by slaves and slave ships as provisions, medicines, cordage and bedding, and afterwards cultivated in garden plots. These included coffee, watermelon and okra, as well as the constituents of many well-known products.

The Wanderer

Author: Erik Calonius
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312343484
Size: 24.26 MB
Format: PDF
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Describes the history of the Wanderer, a one-time yacht transformed into an illegal ship, including its smuggling expeditions and those involved in smuggling slaves into the South.

The Slave Trade And The Middle Passage

Author: S. Pearl Sharp
Publisher: Marshall Cavendish
ISBN: 9780761421764
Size: 54.92 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Traces the history of the transatlantic slave trade and the development of slavery in the New World"--Provided by publisher.