The Souls of Black Folk

The Souls of Black Folk

This landmark in the literature of black protest eloquently affirms that it is beneath the dignity of a human being to beg for those rights that belong inherently to all mankind.

The Souls of Black Folk

The Souls of Black Folk

This landmark book is a founding work in the literature of black protest. W. E. B. Du Bois (1868-1963) played a key role in developing the strategy and program that dominated early 20th-century black protest in America. In this collection of essays, first published together in 1903, he eloquently affirms that it is beneath the dignity of a human being to beg for those rights that belong inherently to all mankind. He also charges that the strategy of accommodation to white supremacy advanced by Booker T. Washington, then the most influential black leader in America, would only serve to perpetuate black oppression. Publication of The Souls of Black Folk was a dramatic event that helped to polarize black leaders into two groups: the more conservative followers of Washington and the more radical supporters of aggressive protest. Its influence cannot be overstated. It is essential reading for everyone interested in African-American history and the struggle for civil rights in America.

The Souls of Black Folk

One Hundred Years Later

The Souls of Black Folk

Published in 1903, The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois was an immediate achievement. More than a hundred years later, the influence of Du Bois's critique of the political, social, and economic encumbrances imposed upon blacks in Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction America can still be felt. “The Souls of Black Folk”: One Hundred Years Later is the first collection of essays to examine Du Bois's work from a variety of academic perspectives, including aesthetics, art history, communications, music, political science, psychology, history, and the classics. Scholars, teachers, and students of American studies and African American studies will find this collection an essential overview of a book that changed the course of American intellectual history.

W. E. B. Du Bois: Selections from His Writings

W. E. B. Du Bois: Selections from His Writings

"These essays by the prolific historian and civil rights activist W. E. B. Du Bois focus on some of the African-American author's lesser-known writings. They include "Strivings of the Negro People," "A Negro Schoolmaster in the New South," "The Talented Tenth," "Address to the Nation: The Niagara Movement Speech," "Evolution of the Race Problem," and more"--

The Negro

The Negro

Insightful summary of African history focuses on African cultures before the slave trade, citing architecture, iron working, writing, and other cultural advances.

Darkwater

Voices from Within the Veil

Darkwater

The distinguished American civil rights leader first published these fiery essays, sketches, and poems nearly 80 years ago in various periodicals. This volume has long inspired readers with its militant cry for reforms for black Americans.

W. E. B. Du Bois and The Souls of Black Folk

W. E. B. Du Bois and The Souls of Black Folk

In this book, Stephanie J. Shaw brings a new understanding to one of the great documents of American and black history. While most scholarly discussions of The Souls of Black Folk focus on the veils, the color line, double consciousness, or Booker T. Washington, Shaw reads Du Bois' book as a profoundly nuanced interpretation of the souls of black Americans at the turn of the twentieth century. Demonstrating the importance of the work as a sociohistorical study of black life in America through the turn of the twentieth century and offering new ways of thinking about many of the topics introduced in Souls, Shaw charts Du Bois' successful appropriation of Hegelian idealism in order to add America, the nineteenth century, and black people to the historical narrative in Hegel's philosophy of history. Shaw adopts Du Bois' point of view to delve into the social, cultural, political, and intellectual milieus that helped to create The Souls of Black Folk.

The Rise and Demise of Black Theology

The Rise and Demise of Black Theology

Black Theology emerged in the 1960s as a response to black consciousness. In South Africa, it is a critique of power; in the UK it is a political theology of black culture. The dominant form of Black Theology has been in the USA, originally influenced by Black Power and the critique of white racism. Since then, it claims to have broadened its perspective to include oppression on the grounds of race, gender and class. In this book, Alistair Kee contests this claim, arguing that Black and Womanist Theologies present inadequate analysis of race and gender and no account at all of class or economic oppression.With a few notable exceptions, Black Theology in the USA repeats the mantras of the 1970s, the discourse of modernity. Content with American capitalism, it fails to address the source of the impoverishment of black Americans at home. Content with a romantic image of Africa, this 'African-American' movement fails to defend contemporary Africa against predatory American global ambitions. Blacks in the West, Kee claims here, are no longer the victims; they are the voters and consumers who should be able to influence western governments - the American government in particular - into changing policies towards Africa in particular and the third world in general. This book does not argue that Black theologians should give up, but that they should move on, for the sake of the black poor in America, the black poor in Africa and the third world. The failure of Black theologians to do so is a cause for concern beyond the circle of practitioners of Black theology.

I’ve Been Racially Profiled. Now What?

I’ve Been Racially Profiled. Now What?

This volume explains what racial profiling is, who is likely to be targeted, and how to deal with the police if you are singled out. Readers will learn about the racial bias in the American justice and prison systems, as well as how to stay out of the school-to-prison pipeline.