The Strange Library

The Strange Library

From internationally acclaimed author Haruki Murakami—a fantastical illustrated short novel about a boy imprisoned in a nightmarish library. Opening the flaps on this unique little book, readers will find themselves immersed in the strange world of best-selling Haruki Murakami's wild imagination. The story of a lonely boy, a mysterious girl, and a tormented sheep man plotting their escape from a nightmarish library, the book is like nothing else Murakami has written. Designed by Chip Kidd and fully illustrated, in full color, throughout, this small format, 96 page volume is a treat for book lovers of all ages. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Haruki Murakami

Challenging Authors

Haruki Murakami

Japanese writer Haruki Murakami has achieved incredible popularity in his native country and world-wide as well as rising critical acclaim. Murakami, in addition to receiving most of the major literary awards in Japan, has been nominated several times for the Nobel Prize. Yet, his relationship with the Japanese literary community proper (known as the Bundan) has not been a particularly friendly one. One of Murakami’s central and enduring themes is a persistent warning not to suppress our fundamental desires in favor of the demands of society at large. Murakami’s writing over his career reveals numerous recurring motifs, but his message has also evolved, creating a catalogue of works that reveals Murakami to be a challenging author. Many of those challenges lie in Murakami’s blurring of genre as well as his rich blending of Japanese and Western mythologies and styles—all while continuing to offer narratives that attract and captivate a wide range of readers. Murakami is, as Ōe Kenzaburō once contended, not a “Japanese writer” so much as a global one, and as such, he merits a central place in the classroom in order to confront readers and students, but to be challenged as well. Reading, teaching, and studying Murakami serves well the goal of rethinking this world. It will open new lines of inquiry into what constitutes national literatures, and how some authors, in the era of blurred national and cultural boundaries, seek now to transcend those boundaries and pursue a truly global mode of expression.

Some Classics of Africana

A Few Books from the Strange Collection Published Before 1850 : Exhibited 1-19 February 1955

Some Classics of Africana


Black Moon Rising (The Library Book 2)

Black Moon Rising (The Library Book 2)

Leave the lights on for The Library, Book 2, another thriller from bestselling author D. J. MacHale! Fans of R. L. Stine, Nightmares!, and Lockwood & Co., check out a book and fall under its spell . . . literally. Marcus is an agent of the Library—a place that exists outside time, filled with stories that don’t have an ending. Mysteries that won’t be solved until Marcus and his friends step in to finish them. Before it’s too late. An evil is plaguing a middle school in Massachusetts. Windows shatter for no reason. Bleachers collapse at a pep rally. Most of the students think they’re just having a string of bad luck, but Marcus and his friends suspect something a lot more sinister. Something like witchcraft. When the black moon rises, this story must come to an end . . . one way or another. Kids love Curse of the Boggin (The Library, Book 1): “A mysterious, hard-to-put-down book with a twisting plot, funny characters, and haunting souls. I can’t wait to hear what adventures they have next.” —A.J. H., age 11 “I read enough in just one day to fill my school reading log for a week.” —Michael C., age 10 “A unique, intriguing book filled with page-turning adventures.” —Madeline H., age 12 “Couldn’t put it down. I stayed up reading until 11:00 p.m. with only one thought in my mind: one more chapter!” —Ben H., age 11

The Invisible Library

The Invisible Library

The first in a gripping, adventurous series, The Invisible Library is the astounding debut from Genevieve Cogman. Irene must be at the top of her game or she'll be off the case – permanently . . . Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, which harvests fiction from different realities. And along with her enigmatic assistant Kai, she's posted to an alternative London. Their mission – to retrieve a dangerous book. But when they arrive, it's already been stolen. London's underground factions seem prepared to fight to the very death to find her book. Adding to the jeopardy, this world is chaos-infested – the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic. Irene's new assistant is also hiding secrets of his own. Soon, she's up to her eyebrows in a heady mix of danger, clues and secret societies. Yet failure is not an option –the nature of reality itself is at stake. The Invisible Library is followed by the second title in The Invisible Library series, The Masked City.

The Elements of Library Research

What Every Student Needs to Know

The Elements of Library Research

To do solid academic research, college students need to look beyond the computer search engine. This short, practical book introduces students to the important components of the information-seeking process. The Elements of Library Research provides a foundation for success in any research assignment, from a freshman paper to a senior thesis. Unlike guides that describe the research process but do not explain its logic, this book focuses entirely on basic concepts, strategies, tools, and tactics for research--in both electronic and print formats. Drawing on decades of experience with undergraduates, reference librarian Mary George arms students with the critical thinking skills and procedures they need to approach any academic project with confidence. Ways to turn a topic into a research question Techniques for effective online searches How to evaluate primary and secondary sources When and how to confer with reference librarians and faculty How to avoid plagiarism Glossary of key terms, from Boolean search to peer review Checklists, timelines, and hints for successful research projects

The Masters Revealed

Madame Blavatsky and the Myth of the Great White Lodge

The Masters Revealed


The Strange Gift of Gwendolyn Golden

The Night Flyer's Handbook

The Strange Gift of Gwendolyn Golden

This morning, I woke up on the ceiling ... So begins the strange story of Gwendolyn Golden. One perfectly ordinary day for no apparent reason, she wakes up floating around her room like one of her little brother’s Batman balloons. Puberty is weird enough. Everyone already thinks she’s an oddball with anger issues because her father vanished in a mysterious storm one night when she was six. Then there are the mean, false rumours people are spreading about her at school. On top of all that, now she’s a flying freak. How can she tell her best friend or her mother? How can she live her life? After Gwendolyn almost meets disaster flying too high and too fast one night, help arrives from the most unexpected place. And stranger still? She’s not alone.

The Strange Connection

U.S. Intervention in China, 1944-1972

The Strange Connection

This book provides an analysis of American intervention in China from World War II to the rapprochement Richard Nixon began in 1972. One of the major themes of the work is that the United States should avoid judging China by Western standards. The United States learned this after twenty-eight years of attempting to impose its own standards of democratic, representative government on China. Alexander also contends that the United States acted against its own interests when it supported the Nationalists and that the United States accused the Chinese Communists of aggressive policies in East Asia when, in fact, they did not pursue aggressive policies. The book traces the origins of the American interest in China, based on Roosevelt's hope to use China as a partner of the United States to preserve the peace in East Asia. It covers the U.S. failure to realize that most Chinese people supported the Communist revolution and the U.S. attempt to keep the reactionary Nationalists in power after they lost the Civil War. Next, the work considers the misconception that Red China was an instigator of the Korean War, the U.S. attempt to destroy the North Korean state, and China's decision to intervene to prevent American forces from proceeding to its frontier. The text also traces the adoption of Taiwan as an American protectorate, the flirtation with atomic war to protect the Nationalist-held islands of Quemoy and Matsu, and the decades-long U.S. policy of denying Communist China a seat at the UN. The work concludes with Nixon's decision to recognize China because U.S. policy was threatening world peace and order.

The Strange Shoe

The Strange Shoe

As in all fables there is a moral: 'It is difficult to take in ideas, however valid, that are well beyond our experience.' Children who read this tale should be able to appreciate the animals' puzzlement, and look at themselves in a new way. The fable has been retold from 'Short Stories About Animals', London 1882. Set in and Indian jungle in the mythical past.