The Strip

Author: Stefan Al
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 026203574X
Size: 72.56 MB
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The transformations of the Strip -- from the fake Wild West to neon signs twenty stories high to "starchitecture" -- and how they mirror America itself.

Buildings And Landmarks Of 20th And 21st Century America American Society Revealed

Author: Elizabeth B. Greene
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 144083993X
Size: 51.33 MB
Format: PDF
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This engaging book uses buildings and structures as a lens through which to explore various strands of U.S. social history, revealing the connections between architecture and the cultural, economic, and political events before and during these American landmarks' construction. • Provides readers with an understanding of the various political and cultural factors and historical happenings that played important roles in the construction of major buildings in the 20th and 21st centuries in the United States • Covers buildings and landmarks as diverse as the Hoover Dam, the Golden Gate Bridge, the Watergate Complex, the World Trade Center, and Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural masterpiece, Fallingwater • Examines the rise of entertainment in the United States and how powerful of an influence it became on American society • Presents historical information in an engaging, informative manner that encourages interactive learning and critical thinking

Becoming America S Playground

Author: Larry D. Gragg
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806165855
Size: 11.99 MB
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In 1950 Las Vegas saw a million tourists. In 1960 it attracted ten million. The city entered the fifties as a regional destination where prosperous postwar Americans could enjoy vices largely forbidden elsewhere, and it emerged in the sixties as a national hotspot, the glitzy resort city that lights up the American West today. Becoming America’s Playground chronicles the vice and the toil that gave Las Vegas its worldwide reputation in those transformative years. Las Vegas’s rise was no happy accident. After World War II, vacationing Americans traveled the country in record numbers, making tourism a top industry in such states as California and Florida. The Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce saw its chance and developed a plan to capitalize on the town’s burgeoning reputation for leisure. Las Vegas pinned its hopes for the future on Americans’ need for escape. Transforming a vice city financed largely by the mob into a family vacation spot was not easy. Hotel and casino publicists closely monitored media representations of the city and took every opportunity to stage images of good, clean fun for the public—posing even the atomic bomb tests conducted just miles away as an attraction. The racism and sexism common in the rest of the nation in the era prevailed in Las Vegas too. The wild success of Frank Sinatra’s Rat Pack performances at the Sands Hotel in 1960 demonstrated the city’s slow progress toward equality. Women couldn’t work as dealers in Las Vegas until the 1970s, yet they found more opportunities for well-paying jobs there than many American women could find elsewhere. Gragg shows how a place like the Las Vegas Strip—with its glitz and vast wealth and its wildly public consumption of vice—rose to prominence in the 1950s, a decade of Cold War anxiety and civil rights conflict. Becoming America’s Playground brings this pivotal decade in Las Vegas into sharp focus for the first time.

Elvis In Vegas

Author: Richard Zoglin
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501151215
Size: 25.27 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The story of how Las Vegas saved Elvis and Elvis saved Las Vegas in the greatest musical comeback of all time. The conventional wisdom is that Las Vegas is what destroyed Elvis Presley, launching him on a downward spiral of drugs, boredom, erratic stage behavior, and eventually his fatal overdose. But in Elvis in Vegas, Richard Zoglin takes an alternate view, arguing that Vegas is where the King of Rock and Roll resurrected his career, reinvented himself as a performer, and created the most exciting show in Vegas history. Elvis’s 1969 opening night in Vegas was his first time back on a live stage in more than eight years. His career had gone sour—bad movies, and mediocre pop songs that no longer made the charts. He’d been dismissed by most critics as over the hill. But in Vegas he played the biggest showroom in the biggest hotel in the city, drawing more people for his four-week engagement than any other show in Vegas history. His performance got rave reviews, “Suspicious Minds” gave him his first number-one hit in seven years, and Elvis became Vegas’s biggest star. Over the next seven years, he performed more than 600 shows there, and sold out every one. Las Vegas was changed too. The intimate night-club-style shows of the Rat Pack, who made Vegas the nation’s premier live-entertainment center in the 1950s and ‘60s, catered largely to well-heeled older gamblers. Elvis brought a new kind of experience: an over-the-top, rock-concert-like extravaganza. He set a new bar for Vegas performers, with the biggest salary, the biggest musical production, and the biggest promotion campaign the city had ever seen. In doing so, he opened the door to a new generation of pop/rock performers, and brought a new audience to Vegas—a mass audience from Middle America that Vegas depends on for its success to this day. A classic comeback tale set against the backdrop of Las Vegas’s golden age, Richard Zoglin’s Elvis in Vegas is a feel-good story for the ages.

The Immersive Worlds Handbook

Author: Scott A. Lukas
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0240820932
Size: 47.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Scott Lukas, famed industry expert on designing themed spaces, brings you a book that focuses on the imaginative world of themed, immersive and consumer spaces. Whether or not you are involved in designing a theme park, cultural museum, shop, or other entertainment space, you will benefit from the insider tips, experiences, and techniques highlighted in this practical guide. Make your themed spaces come to life and become true, immersive worlds. The book features informative sidebars addressing possible design issues and current trends; case studies and interviews with real-world designers, and further reading suggestions. The book also includes a companion website, as well as exercises that accompany each chapter, lavish photos, illustrations, and tables. * Practical guide for designers of entertainment spaces on how to create convincing and effective immersive worlds (whether theme parks, museums, shopping malls, lifestyle stores, or entertainment venues) * Lavish photos: Peek into immersive worlds in the stunning photos that line the pages of the book * Practical charts and tables offer clear and concise summaries of key concepts * Inspiration to stimulate design process with real world examples * Interviews with expert voices in the field covering practical hard-won techniques

The Fifties In America

Author: John C. Super
Publisher: Decades (Salem Press)
ISBN:
Size: 49.60 MB
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Surveys the events and people of the United States and Canada from 1950 through 1959.

Architecture And The American Dream

Author: Craig Whitaker
Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)
ISBN:
Size: 79.24 MB
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An examination of how American culture and history are reflected in American architecture

City Lights

Author: John A. Jakle
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 46.54 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Today's cities shine brightly at night, illuminated by millions of street lamps, neon signs, and incandescent and fluorescent bulbs burning in the windows of office blocks, apartment buildings, and homes. Indeed, the modern city is in large part defined by this brilliance. In contrast, cities before the end of the 19th century were dominated by shadows and darkness, their oil lamps mostly ineffectual against the night. The introduction of modern lighting technologies in the 1870s--at first natural gas and later electricity--transformed urban life in America and around the world. This promethean story and its impact on the shape and pace of life in the American city is engagingly recounted by John A. Jakle in City Lights. Jakle reveals how artificial lighting became a dynamic instrument that altered every aspect of the urban landscape and was in turn shaped by the growth of America's automobile culture. He examines the technological and entrepreneurial innovations that made urban illumination possible and then explores the various ways in which artificial lighting was used to enhance -- for reasons of commerce, safety, aesthetics, and mobility -- such public spaces as streets, festivals, world's fairs, amusement parks, landmarks, and business districts. From the corner street lamp to the dazzling display of Broadway's "Great White Way," City Lights offers a lively and informative investigation into the geography of the night.

Adapting Cities To Sea Level Rise

Author: Stefan Al
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610919084
Size: 22.96 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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As cities build more flood-management infrastructure to adapt to the effects of a changing climate, they must go beyond short-term flood protection and consider the long-term effects on the community, its environment, economy, and relationship with the water. Adapting Cities to Sea Level Rise, by infrastructure expert Stefan Al, introduces design responses to sea-level rise, drawing from examples around the globe. Going against standard engineering solutions, Al argues for approaches that are integrated with the public realm, nature-based, and sensitive to local conditions and the community. He features design responses to building resilience that creates new civic assets for cities. With the right solution, Al shows, sea-level rise can become an opportunity to improve our urban areas and landscapes, rather than a threat to our communities.