The Unfinished Journey

America Since World War II

The Unfinished Journey

This popular classic text chronicles America's roller-coaster journey through the decades since World War II. Considering both the paradoxes and the possibilities of post-war America, Chafe portrays the significant cultural and political themes that have colored our country's past and present, including issues of race, class, gender, foreign policy, and economic and social reform. He examines such subjects as the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, the origins and the end of the Cold War, the culture of the 1970s, the Reagan years, the Clinton presidency, and the events of September 11th and their aftermath. In this edition, Chafe provides an insightful assessment of Clinton's legacy as president, particularly in light of his impeachment, and an entirely new chapter that examines the impact of two of America's most pivotal events of the twenty-first century: the 2000 presidential election turmoil and the September 11th terrorist attacks. Chafe puts forth an excellent account of George W. Bush's first year as president and also covers his subsequent role as a world leader following his administration's declared war on terrorism. The completely revised epilogue and updated bibliographic essay offer a compelling and controversial final commentary on America's past and its future. Brilliantly written by a prize-winning historian, the fifth edition of The Unfinished Journey is an essential text for all students of recent American history.

The unfinished journey

America since World War II

The unfinished journey

This popular chronicles America's text roller-coaster journey through the decades since WorLd War II. Considering both the paradoxes and the possibilities of post-war America, Chafe portrays the significant cultural and political, themes which have colored our country's past and present, including issues of race, class, gender, foreign policy, and economic and social reform. This new edition of The Unfinished Journey has been updated to include a revised epilogue as well as an entirely new chapter on the Clinton presidency and current cultural and political issues.

The unfinished journey

America since World War II

The unfinished journey

In this gripping, brilliantly written narrative, prize-winning historian William Chafe offers a vibrant chronicle of America's roller-coaster journey through the past forty-five years. Now revised and expanded to assess the impact of the Reagan years, The Unfinished Journey offers substantial new material on Reagan's first legislative victories, the rise of Mikhail Gorbachev and improved relations with the Soviet Union, and the Iran-Contra affair. Chafe examines the Reagan credo in detail, explores the conditions in American society that helped Reagan gain the presidency and stay in power for eight years, and surveys the effects of conservative policies on the economic, social, and cultural fabric of America. In addition, Chafe looks briefly at the first years of the Bush administration, and adds an epilogue analyzing America's prospects in the 1990s. Compelling and controversial, The Unfinished Journey captures the pulse of the nation, and brings its recent history to life.

Outlines & Highlights for The Unfinished Journey

America Since World War II by Chafe

Outlines & Highlights for The Unfinished Journey

Never HIGHLIGHT a Book Again! Virtually all testable terms, concepts, persons, places, and events are included. Cram101 Textbook Outlines gives all of the outlines, highlights, notes for your textbook with optional online practice tests. Only Cram101 Outlines are Textbook Specific. Cram101 is NOT the Textbook. Accompanys: 9780195315370

Mexican Americans and World War II

Mexican Americans and World War II

A valuable book and the first significant scholarship on Mexican Americans in World War II. Up to 750,000 Mexican American men served in World War II, earning more Medals of Honor and other decorations in proportion to their numbers than any other ethnic group.

Time to Heal

American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care

Time to Heal

Already the recipient of extraordinary critical acclaim, this magisterial book provides a landmark account of American medical education in the twentieth century, concluding with a call for the reformation of a system currently handicapped by managed care and by narrow, self-centered professional interests. Kenneth M. Ludmerer describes the evolution of American medical education from 1910, when a muck-raking report on medical diploma mills spurred the reform and expansion of medical schools, to the current era of managed care, when commercial interests once more have come to the fore, compromising the training of the nation's future doctors. Ludmerer portrays the experience of learning medicine from the perspective of students, house officers, faculty, administrators, and patients, and he traces the immense impact on academic medical centers of outside factors such as World War II, the National Institutes of Health, private medical insurance, and Medicare and Medicaid. Most notably, the book explores the very real threats to medical education in the current environment of managed care, viewing these developments not as a catastrophe but as a challenge to make many long overdue changes in medical education and medical practice. Panoramic in scope, meticulously researched, brilliantly argued, and engagingly written, Time to Heal is both a stunning work of scholarship and a courageous critique of modern medical education. The definitive book on the subject, it provides an indispensable framework for making informed choices about the future of medical education and health care in America.

The Man Who Knew

The Life & Times of Alan Greenspan

The Man Who Knew

WINNER OF THE 2016 FT & McKINSEY BUSINESS BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD, this is the biography of one of the titans of financial history over the last fifty years. Born in 1926, Alan Greenspan was raised in Manhattan by a single mother and immigrant grandparents during the Great Depression but by quiet force of intellect, rose to become a global financial 'maestro'. Appointed by Ronald Reagan to Chairman of the Federal Reserve, a post he held for eighteen years, he presided over an unprecedented period of stability and low inflation, was revered by economists, adored by investors and consulted by leaders from Beijing to Frankfurt. Both data-hound and eligible society bachelor, Greenspan was a man of contradictions. His great success was to prove the very idea he, an advocate of the Gold standard, doubted: that the discretionary judgements of a money-printing central bank could stabilise an economy. He resigned in 2006, having overseen tumultuous changes in the world's most powerful economy. Yet when the great crash happened only two years later many blamed him, even though he had warned early on of irrational exuberance in the market place. Sebastian Mallaby brilliantly shows the subtlety and complexity of Alan Greenspan's legacy. Full of beautifully rendered high-octane political infighting, hard hitting dialogue and stories, The Man Who Knew is superbly researched, enormously gripping and the story of the making of modern finance.

Food in the USA

A Reader

Food in the USA

From Thanksgiving to fast food to anorexia nervosa, Food in the USA brings together essential reading on these topics and is the only substantial collection of essays on food and culture in America. The broad range of essay topics include: the corporate food industry, soup kitchens, meat-eating, fast food, waitressing, Coca-Cola, Aunt Jemima, the Passover seder, soul food, diabetes, and nutrition. Together, the collection provides a fascinating look at how and why we are what we eat.

Changed for Good

A Feminist History of the Broadway Musical

Changed for Good

From Adelaide in "Guys and Dolls" to Nina in "In the Heights" and Elphaba in "Wicked," female characters in Broadway musicals have belted and crooned their way into the American psyche. In this lively book, Stacy Wolf illuminates the women of American musical theatre - performers, creators, and characters -- from the start of the cold war to the present day, creating a new, feminist history of the genre. Moving from decade to decade, Wolf first highlights the assumptions that circulated about gender and sexuality at the time. She then looks at the leading musicals to stress the key aspects of the plays as they relate to women, and often finds overlooked moments of empowerment for female audience members. The musicals discussed here are among the most beloved in the canon--"West Side Story," "Cabaret," "A Chorus Line," "Phantom of the Opera," and many others--with special emphasis on the blockbuster "Wicked." Along the way, Wolf demonstrates how the musical since the mid-1940s has actually been dominated by women--women onstage, women in the wings, and women offstage as spectators and fans.

Us Vs. Them

American Political and Cultural Conflict from WW II to Watergate

Us Vs. Them

Culture. Politics. Thick, impenetrable tension. Post-1945 America. Professor Robert Bresler broaches these interwoven themes in Us vs. Them: American Political and Cultural Conflict from WWII to Watergate, a reader in the American Visions series. Offering a broad overview of the interrelationship of culture and politics in the second half of the twentieth century, Us vs. Them is an exploration of the historical roots of America's current cultural wars. In the extended essay that constitutes the first half of the book, Professor Bresler offers a seamless introduction to the intermingling of American politics and culture, from the rise of an American consensus in the immediate postwar period to its inevitable decline in the 1960s and early 1970s. Part II consists of documents and readings that illustrate and buttress Bresler's argument including political manifestos and excerpts from the works of major essayists such as Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., Mary McCarthy, and Norman Podhoretz. Lending a flavor of contemporary debate, this documentary material allows an integrative approach to politics and culture. Valuable for instructors who want to blend political ideas and cultural controversy into their American studies, American history, or political science courses, Us vs. Them gives students a key to understanding contemporary cultural politics. This important compilation is a guide to post-1945 America that places the evolution of political institutions-the presidency, Congress, the courts-within a broad cultural context.