The United States Constitution

The United States Constitution

The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation by Jonathan Hennessey Our leaders swear to uphold it, our military to defend it. It is the blueprint for the shape and function of government itself and what defines Americans as Americans. But how many of us truly know our Constitution? The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation uses the art of illustrated storytelling to breathe life into our nation's cornerstone principles. Simply put, it is the most enjoyable and groundbreaking way to read the governing document of the United States. Spirited and visually witty, it roves article by article, amendment by amendment, to get at the meaning, background, and enduring relevance of the law of the land. What revolutionary ideas made the Constitution's authors dare to cast off centuries of rule by kings and queens? Why do we have an electoral college rather than a popular vote for president and vice president? How did a document that once sanctioned slavery, denied voting rights to women, and turned a blind eye to state governments running roughshod over the liberties of minorities transform into a bulwark of protection for all? The United States Constitution answers all of these questions. Sure to surprise, challenge, and provoke, it is hands down the most memorable introduction to America's founding document. We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

The United States Constitution

A Graphic Adaptation

The United States Constitution

Our leaders swear to uphold it, our military to defend it. It is the blueprint for the shape and function of government itself and what defines Americans as Americans. But how many of us truly know our Constitution? The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation uses the art of illustrated storytelling to breathe life into our nation's cornerstone principles. Simply put, it is the most enjoyable and groundbreaking way to read the governing document of the United States. Spirited and visually witty, it roves article by article, amendment by amendment, to get at the meaning, background, and enduring relevance of the law of the land. What revolutionary ideas made the Constitution's authors dare to cast off centuries of rule by kings and queens? Why do we have an electoral college rather than a popular vote for president and vice president? How did a document that once sanctioned slavery, denied voting rights to women, and turned a blind eye to state governments running roughshod over the liberties of minorities transform into a bulwark of protection for all? The United States Constitution answers all of these questions. Sure to surprise, challenge, and provoke, it is hands down the most memorable introduction to America's founding document.

The United States Constitution

A Graphic Adaptation

The United States Constitution

Our leaders swear to uphold it, our military to defend it. It is the blueprint for the shape and function of government itself and what defines Americans as Americans. But how many of us truly know our Constitution? The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation uses the art of illustrated storytelling to breathe life into our nation's cornerstone principles. Simply put, it is the most enjoyable and groundbreaking way to read the governing document of the United States. Spirited and visually witty, it roves article by article, amendment by amendment, to get at the meaning, background, and enduring relevance of the law of the land. What revolutionary ideas made the Constitution's authors dare to cast off centuries of rule by kings and queens? Why do we have an electoral college rather than a popular vote for president and vice president? How did a document that once sanctioned slavery, denied voting rights to women, and turned a blind eye to state governments running roughshod over the liberties of minorities transform into a bulwark of protection for all? The United States Constitution answers all of these questions. Sure to surprise, challenge, and provoke, it is hands down the most memorable introduction to America's founding document.

Worth A Thousand Words

Using Graphic Novels to Teach Visual and Verbal Literacy

Worth A Thousand Words

Use graphic novels to teach visual and verbal literacy While our kids today are communicating outside the classroom in abbreviated text bursts with visual icons, teachers are required to teach them to critically listen, think, and read and write complex texts. Graphic novels are a uniquely poised vehicle we can use to bridge this dissonance between student communication skills and preferences with mandated educational goals. Worth a Thousand Words details how and why graphic novels are complex texts with advanced-level vocabulary, and demonstrates how to read and analyze these texts. It includes practical advice on how to integrate these books into both ELA and content-area classrooms and provides an extensive list of appropriate graphic novels for K-8 students, lesson suggestions, paired graphic/prose reading suggestions, and additional resources for taking these texts further. Provides research to back up why graphic novels are such powerful educational tools Helps you engage diverse student learners with exciting texts Shows you how to make lessons more meaningful Offers advice on implementing new literary mediums into your classroom Perfect for parents and teachers in grades K-8, Worth a Thousand Words opens up an exciting new world for teaching children visual and verbal literacy.

Connecting Comics to Curriculum

Strategies for Grades 6-12

Connecting Comics to Curriculum

Here is the essential guide for librarians and teachers who want to develop a quality, curriculum-based graphic novel collection—and use its power to engage and inform middle and high school students. * Photos of school libraries, classrooms, and students * Model template lesson plans by subject area * A list of recommended resources, such as professional books, websites and blogs * A glossary of common graphic novel terms * Bibliographies of quality classic and contemporary graphic novel titles for libraries and classrooms, broken down into middle school and high school curricular areas

Epochalypse

Epochalypse

Legendary Comics turns history on its head with the sci-fi adventure Epochalypse, a mind-bending new series from historical author Jonathan Hennessey (The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation; The Gettysburg Address: A Graphic Adaptation) and acclaimed artist Shane Davis (Superman: Earth One, Shadow Walk). When a mysterious space-time phenomenon causes 600 years of human history to collapse into a single era, societies from the past, present and future are forced to coexist in a dystopian civilization. To set the timeline straight, an elite team of Resynchronization Officers must rid the world of Anachronisms -- futuristic artifacts that threaten the very laws of time. To ensure our future, we must undo it. As one defiant officer leads the manhunt for elusive scientist Dr. Tomorrow and notorious outlaw The Salesman, he is challenged by shadowy agencies, rebel militias and forbidden desire. Can our hero save history -- or doom the future? • Compilation of the 6 issue series • Includes bonus materials on the making of the comic From the Trade Paperback edition.

Read On...History

Reading Lists for Every Taste

Read On...History

Make history come alive! This book helps librarians and teachers as well as readers themselves find books they will enjoy—titles that will animate and explain the past, entertain, and expand their minds.

The Creation of the U. S. Constitution

The Creation of the U. S. Constitution

Tells the story of the debates, disagreements, and compromises that led to the formation of the U.S. Constitution during the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Written in graphic-novel format.

Graphics for Learning

Proven Guidelines for Planning, Designing, and Evaluating Visuals in Training Materials

Graphics for Learning

Are you getting the most learning value from visuals? Thoroughly revised and updated, Graphics for Learning is the second edition of the bestselling book that summarizes the guidelines for the best use of graphics for instructional materials, including multimedia, texts, working aids, and slides. The guidelines are based on the most current empirical scientific research and are illustrated with a wealth of examples from diverse training materials. The authors show how to plan illustrations for various types of content, including facts, concepts, processes, procedures, and principles. The book also discusses technical and environmental factors that will influence how instructional professionals can apply the guidelines to their training projects. Praise for the First Edition "For years I've been looking for a book that links cognitive research on learning to graphics and instructional design. Here it is! Ruth Clark and Chopeta Lyons not only explain how to make graphics work—they've created a very interesting read, full of useful guidelines and examples." —Lynn Kearny, CPT, instructional designer and graphic communicator, Graphic Tools for Thinking and Learning "Finally! A book that integrates visual design into the larger context of instructional design and development." —Linda Lohr, Ed.D., author, Creating Graphics for Learning and assistant professor, University of Northern Colorado