The Wars of the Roses

The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors

The Wars of the Roses

The author of the New York Times bestseller The Plantagenets chronicles the next chapter in British history—the historical backdrop for Game of Thrones The crown of England changed hands five times over the course of the fifteenth century, as two branches of the Plantagenet dynasty fought to the death for the right to rule. In this riveting follow-up to The Plantagenets, celebrated historian Dan Jones describes how the longest-reigning British royal family tore itself apart until it was finally replaced by the Tudors. Some of the greatest heroes and villains of history were thrown together in these turbulent times, from Joan of Arc to Henry V, whose victory at Agincourt marked the high point of the medieval monarchy, and Richard III, who murdered his own nephews in a desperate bid to secure his stolen crown. This was a period when headstrong queens and consorts seized power and bent men to their will. With vivid descriptions of the battles of Towton and Bosworth, where the last Plantagenet king was slain, this dramatic narrative history revels in bedlam and intrigue. It also offers a long-overdue corrective to Tudor propaganda, dismantling their self-serving account of what they called the Wars of the Roses.

The Hollow Crown

The Wars of the Roses and the Rise of the Tudors

The Hollow Crown

'The Hollow Crown is exhilarating, epic, blood-and-roses history . . . Jones's material is thrilling . . . There is fine scholarly intuition on display here and a mastery of the grand narrative; it is a supremely skilful piece of storytelling.' Sunday Telegraph The fifteenth century saw the crown of England change hands seven times as the great families of England fought to the death for power, majesty and the right to rule. The Hollow Crown completes Dan Jones' epic history of medieval England, and describes how the Plantagenets tore themselves apart to be finally replaced by the Tudors. Some of the greatest heroes and villains in British history were thrown together in these turbulent times: Henry V, whose victory at Agincourt and prudent rule at home marked the high point of the medieval monarchy; Edward IV, who was handed his crown by the scheming soldier Warwick the Kingmaker, before their alliance collapsed into a fight to the death; and the last Plantagenet, Richard III, who stole the throne and murdered his own nephews, the Princes in the Tower. Finally, the Tudors arrived - but even their rule was only made certain in the 1520s, when Henry VIII ruthlessly hunted down his family's last remaining enemies. In the midst this tumult, chivalry was reborn, the printing press arrived and the Renaissance began to flourish. With vivid descriptions of the battle of Towton, where 28,000 men died in a single morning, and the Battle of Bosworth Field, at which Richard III was hacked down, this is the real story behind Shakespeare's famous history plays.

The War of the Roses

Fascinating History of the Fall of Plantagenet and Rise of Tudors

The War of the Roses

A Fascinating History About The Wars of the Roses: The Fall of Tudors and Rise of PlantagenetsThe Wars of the Roses were a complex set of battles, skirmishes, and kidnappings during the 15th century in England. They had their roots in the nearby Civil War of France, which greatly influenced English politics for years to come. Though there is no one universally accepted start or end date for these wars, the major events throughout the wars occurred between 1455 and 1485.The central reason for the Wars of the Roses, otherwise referred to as the 15th century English Civil War, was a tug-of-war between two families for the throne of England. Though both families were in fact closely related, they had split half a century earlier. Instead of one unified Plantagenet family, the cousins became Lancasters and Yorks. While the Lancasters remained on the throne, the Yorks were overlooked in the succession of kings. The Yorks became jealous, given their equal relation to England's ancient monarchy, and when the Plantagenet-Lancaster dynasty appeared tragically weakened by the succession of Henry VI, the royal cousins took the opportunity to demand a new ruler.Henry VI took over the rule of England upon the death of his father when he was not yet one year old. A scramble over leadership in the boy's appointed Regency Council led to the prominence first of Henry's Lancaster uncles, then Richard of York. Upon Henry's coming of age, Richard of York was unwilling to give up his power and under many pretenses, he raised an army.Over the course of several decades, the royalist army and rebel armies fought throughout the country. Led first by Richard of York, then by his son Edward of York, the rebels gained and lost the power of the crown multiple times, as of course did the royal Plantagenet-Lancaster side. Fighting continued until both sides eventually lost their grip on the crown into the hands of the founder of a brand-new royal dynasty.Here Is A Preview Of What You Will Get: In The Wars of the Roses , you will get a full understanding of the book. In The Wars of the Roses , you will get some fun multiple choice quizzes, along with answers to help you learn about the book. Get a copy, and learn everything about The Wars of the Roses .

Early Modern England 1485-1714

A Narrative History

Early Modern England 1485-1714

The new, fully-updated edition of the popular introduction to the Tudor-Stuart period—offers fresh scholarship and improved readability. Early Modern England 1485-1714 is the market-leading introduction to the Tudor-Stuart period of English history. This accessible and engaging volume enables readers to understand the political, religious, cultural, and socio-economic forces that propelled the nation from small feudal state to preeminent world power. The authors, leading scholars and teachers in the field, have designed the text for those with little or no prior knowledge of the subject. The book’s easy-to-follow narrative explores the world the English created and inhabited between the 15th and 18th centuries. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to reflect the latest scholarship on the subject, such as Henry VIII’s role in the English Reformation and the use of gendered language by Elizabeth I. A new preface addresses the theme of periodization, while revised chapters offer fresh perspectives on proto-industrialization in England, economic developments in early modern London, merchants and adventurers in the Middle East, the popular cultural life of ordinary people, and more. Offering a lively, reader-friendly narrative of the period, this text: Offers a wide-ranging overview of two and half centuries of English history in one volume Highlights how social and cultural changes affected ordinary English people at various stages of the time period Explores how the Irish, Scots, and Welsh affected English history Features maps, charts, genealogies and illustrations throughout the text Includes access to a companion website containing online resources Early Modern England 1485-1714 is an indispensable resource for undergraduate students in early modern England courses, as well as students in related fields such as literature and Renaissance studies.

An Illustrated Introduction to the Tudors

An Illustrated Introduction to the Tudors

The six monarchs of the Tudor dynasty are phenomenally well known. Henry VII succeeded in ending the Wars of the Roses, Henry VIII formed the Church of England and famously married six times: Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard and Katherine Parr. His three children, Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I, would all ascend to the throne, as would his great-niece Lady Jane Grey. Between them they ruled for an eventful 118 years. This easy-to-follow introduction to the Tudors follows the major events and personalities of the age.

Lives of England's Monarchs

The Story of Our American English Heritage

Lives of England's Monarchs

This informative entertaining read tells, with wit and understanding, England

Traveling with Philosophes

Traveling with Philosophes

Join a fellow traveler on a walkabout through Paris and London, and then travel with him across England, Scotland and Wales. After those walkabouts, accompany him as he journeys across America and follows the equator to Australia. Finally, wander with him along the corridors of modern and postmodern philosophy, and as he travels with old and new Philosophes, who all voiced an opinion as regards this travel book. It is a book that people won't buy, won't read and won't praise. Mark Twain After reading only a few pages, I gave up the study of philosophy forever. Voltaire I cannot look upon the book without shedding tears. Bertrand Russell If I could only make a travel book like that, I would be perfectly willing to die-even anxious. John Dewey I have seen a great many travel books in my time, but none that this one reminds me of. Will Durant This travel book is one-third fabrication, one-third prevarication and one-third barefaced lies. However, the rest of the book is the unadulterated truth. Dr. Morris A. Nussbaum

The Woodvilles

The Wars of the Roses and England's Most Infamous Family

The Woodvilles

In 1464, the most eligible bachelor in England, Edward IV, stunned the nation by revealing his secret marriage to Elizabeth Woodville, a beautiful, impoverished widow whose father and brother Edward himself had once ridiculed as upstarts. Edward’s controversial match brought his queen’s large family to court and into the thick of the Wars of the Roses. This is the story of the family whose fates would be inextricably intertwined with the fall of the Plantagenets and the rise of the Tudors: Richard, the squire whose marriage to a duchess would one day cost him his head; Jacquetta, mother to the queen and accused witch; Elizabeth, the commoner whose royal destiny would cost her three of her sons; Anthony, the scholar and jouster who was one of Richard III’s first victims; and Edward, whose military exploits would win him the admiration of Ferdinand and Isabella.

A Wealth of Buildings: Marking the Rhythm of English History

Volume I: 1066–1688

A Wealth of Buildings: Marking the Rhythm of English History

This two-volume book explores how the great buildings of England bear witness to a thousand years of the nation’s history. In every age, investment in iconic buildings reaches a climax when the prevailing mode of production is operating most effectively, surplus wealth is most plentiful, and the dominant class rules supreme. During such periods of stability and prosperity, the demand for new buildings is strong, structural and stylistic innovations abound, and there is fierce competition to build for lasting fame. Each such climax produces a unique vintage of hegemonic buildings that are monuments to the wealth and power of those who ruled their world. This first volume provides an introduction to the study of wealth accumulation over the past millennium. There follow three case studies of iconic building investment from the eleventh to the seventeenth century. During the eleventh and twelfth centuries the conquering Norman kings and barons erected castles throughout the country to cement their feudal power. During the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the great wealth of the ecclesiastical estates funded the lavish construction of Gothic cathedrals and abbeys. During the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries Tudor and Jacobean magnates vied to build the most magnificent palaces and prodigy houses. The English Revolution brought this era to a close.

The Wars of the Roses

The Wars of the Roses

A concise and entertaining study of the vicious wars between the English noble houses of York and Lancaster during the 15th century. The vicious wars between the English noble houses of York and Lancaster marked the end of medieval England and the birth of the Renaissance. The end of that thirty-year period of strife and bloodshed saw the collapse of the great Plantagenet dynasty, rulers of all England and much of France for over three hundred years, and the rise of the Tudors. All the characters are here: Henry V and his luckless son, Henry VI, together with his unfortunate uncles, John of Bedford and Humphrey of Gloucester, not to mention the notorious Richard III and his nephews - The Princes in the Tower. Neillands skilfully tackles this complex period providing a clear and entertaining analysis.