The Women of the Castle

the moving New York Times bestseller for readers of ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE

The Women of the Castle

In war they made impossible choices. Now can they live with them? 'Moving . . . surprises and devastates' New York Times 'Masterful' People 'Mesmerising . . . reveals new truths about one of history's most tragic eras' USA Today The Third Reich has crumbled. The Russians are coming. Marianne von Lingenfels - widow of a resister murdered by the Nazi regime - finds refuge in the crumbling Bavarian castle where she once played host to German high society. There she fulfils her promise to find and protect the wives and children of her husband's brave conspirators, rescuing her dearest friend's widow, Benita, from sexual slavery to the Russian army, and Ania from a work camp for political prisoners. As Marianne assembles this makeshift family she is certain their shared pain will bind them together. But as Benita begins a clandestine relationship and Ania struggles to conceal her role in the Nazi regime, Marianne learns that her clear-cut, highly principled world view has no place in these new, frightening and emotionally-charged days. All three women must grapple with the realities they now face, and the consequences of decisions each made in the darkest of times . . . Deeply moving and compelling, The Women of the Castle is a heart-wrenching and hopeful novel of secrets and survival, a reckoning, and the astonishing power of forgiveness. Perfect for fans of All the Light You Cannot See, The Reader and The Light Between Oceans.

The Role of Women in Gothic Novels - 'The Castle of Otranto' by Horace Walpole, 'The Italian' by Ann Radcliffe, 'Melmoth the Wanderer' by Charles Robert Maturin

The Role of Women in Gothic Novels - 'The Castle of Otranto' by Horace Walpole, 'The Italian' by Ann Radcliffe, 'Melmoth the Wanderer' by Charles Robert Maturin

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2.0, University of Osnabruck, 14 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: There are more than 50 years between "The Castle of Otranto" and "Melmoth the Wanderer." "The Castle of Otranto" was published 1764, "The Italian" 1797 and "Melmoth the Wanderer" 1820. It might be interesting that "The Castle of Otranto" was published in year of birth of Ann Radcliffe and "The Italian" has been published in the year Horace Walpole died. An incident of course, but an interesting one. "The Castle of Otranto" is set in the time between 1095 and 1243, "The Italian" is set in the 18th century and "Melmoth the Wanderer" covers an period of time from the late 17th century to the early 19th century. In the following work will find out especially about the women in the three mentioned novels. In which way are they presented, is there a stereotype of a gothic heroine and are there changes throughout the time referring to the date of publishing and writing? The first point will be a short definition of the term "Gothic" according to literature. The second point will be an introduction of the three authors. For a better understanding of their work and the possible differences a look at their biography is absolutely necessary for me. In order of publishing I will introduce Horace Walpole ("The Castle of Otranto"), Ann Radcliffe ("The Italian") and Charles Robert Maturin ("Melmoth the Wanderer"). Additional to some biographical dates I will give some information about their work and their style of writing. After introducing the authors I will concentrate on the novels and how women are described and presented. Which role do they play in the three novels? Is there something special about each woman in the texts? Here I will concentrate on some characteristics which are typical for gothic novels and not so much on the social conventions or expectations women are faced with at the appropria"

The Woman in Black

The Woman in Black

‘I did not believe in ghosts’ Few attend Mrs Alice Drablow’s funeral, and not one blood relative amongst them. There are undertakers with shovels, of course, a local official who would rather be anywhere else, and one Mr Arthur Kipps, solicitor from London. He is to spend the night in Eel Marsh House, the place where the old recluse died amidst a sinking swamp, a blinding fog and a baleful mystery about which the townsfolk refuse to speak. Young Mr Kipps expects a boring evening alone sorting out paperwork and searching for Mrs Drablow’s will. But when the high tide pens him in, what he finds – or rather what finds him – is something else entirely. In the 'Backstory' discover more classic ghost stories and some real-life ones too... Vintage Children’s Classics is a twenty-first century classics list aimed at 8-12 year olds and the adults in their lives. Discover timeless favourites from The Jungle Book and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to modern classics such as The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.

Women in the Shadows

Women in the Shadows

Women in the Shadows discusses the biographies of five brilliant and talented women born in the Austro-Hungarian Empire: Mileva Einstein-Maric, Margarete Jeanne Trakl, Lise Meitner, Milena Jesenská, and Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky. Charles S. Chiu creates «a narrative against forgetting, as a small step out of darkness» by writing about these women's accomplishments, which were overshadowed by those of the famous men in their lives. Edith Borchardt's translation brings this narrative to a wider audience. Women in the Shadows will interest scientists and scholars in the humanities as well as the general reader. The women portrayed represent various fields - mathematics, physics, music and literature, journalism, and architecture - making Women in the Shadows suitable for courses on the history of science, German and Austrian studies, as well as women's studies.

The Red Castle Women

The Red Castle Women

A ferryman's niece makes a wealthy marriage, only to find herself imperiled by secrets of her brooding mansion home and her own mysterious past.

The Contested Castle

Gothic Novels and the Subversion of Domestic Ideology

The Contested Castle

The Gothic novel emerged out of the romantic mist alongside a new conception of the home as a separate sphere for women. Looking at novels from Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Kate Ferguson Ellis investigates the relationship between these two phenomena of middle-class culture--the idealization of the home and the popularity of the Gothic--and explores how both male and female authors used the Gothic novel to challenge the false claim of home as a safe, protected place. Linking terror -- the most important ingredient of the Gothic novel -- to acts of transgression, Ellis shows how houses in Gothic fiction imprison those inside them, while those locked outside wander the earth plotting their return and their revenge.

The Female Figure in Contemporary Historical Fiction

The Female Figure in Contemporary Historical Fiction

From The Other Boleyn Girl to Fingersmith , this collection explores the popularity of female-centred historical novels in recent years. It asks how these representations are influenced by contemporary gender politics, and whether they can be seen as part of a wider feminist project to recover women's history.

A Literary History of Women's Writing in Britain, 1660–1789

A Literary History of Women's Writing in Britain, 1660–1789

Drawing on three decades of feminist scholarship bent on rediscovering lost and abandoned women writers, Susan Staves provides a comprehensive history of women's writing in Britain from the Restoration to the French Revolution. This major work of criticism also offers fresh insights about women's writing in all literary forms, not only fiction, but also poetry, drama, memoir, autobiography, biography, history, essay, translation and the familiar letter. Authors celebrated in their own time and who have been neglected, and those who have been revalued and studied, are given equal attention. The book's organisation by chronology and its attention to history challenge the way we periodise literary history. Each chapter includes a list of key works written in the period covered, as well as a narrative and critical assessment of the works. This magisterial work includes a comprehensive bibliography and list of prevalent editions of the authors discussed.

The Cambridge Companion to Women's Writing in the Romantic Period

The Cambridge Companion to Women's Writing in the Romantic Period

The Romantic period saw the first generations of professional women writers flourish in Great Britain. Literary history is only now giving them the attention they deserve, for the quality of their writings and for their popularity in their own time. This collection of new essays by leading scholars explores the challenges and achievements of this fascinating set of women writers, including Jane Austen, Mary Wollstonecraft, Ann Radcliffe, Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, and Mary Shelley alongside many lesser-known female authors writing and publishing during this period. Chapters consider major literary genres, including poetry, fiction, drama, travel writing, histories, essays, and political writing, as well as topics such as globalization, colonialism, feminism, economics, families, sexualities, aging, and war. The volume shows how gender intersected with other aspects of identity and with cultural concerns that then shaped the work of authors, critics, and readers.